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5 Different Types of Restaurants to Work For

By: The Art Institutes Filed under: Culinary

July 27, 2017

5 Different Types of Restaurants to Work For

Wondering where a restaurant 
culinary arts career could take you? All over the world if you choose to work for a cruise line! Perhaps all over your city if you’re in a food truck. Or, maybe, you prefer the stability of staying in one spot and working for either a fine dining, casual, or food hall restaurant. Learn more about each of these types of restaurants below!

1. Fine Dining
Fine dining restaurants aim to provide the best in cuisine, service, and atmosphere all in one. Such experiences come with a hefty price tag for diners, but they also give culinary professionals an opportunity to get creative with top-of-the-line ingredients. In these restaurants, you’ll often plan full five course meals showcasing locally sourced foods or rare and expensive spices, meats, seafood, fruits, and vegetables. Some fine dining restaurants offer small prix fixe menus or regularly changing menus to incorporate seasonal items at their peak, but, no matter their size, every fine dining menu should feature carefully crafted, one-of-a-kind dishes.

2. Casual or Family-Style
Casual or family-style restaurants may have either a highly specialized or broad focus. Either way, entrees at these restaurants are moderately priced and meals are accompanied with tableside service. While kitchens at these restaurants may work with slightly lower cost ingredients when compared to fine dining restaurants, you can still make high quality food that’s also affordable. You’ll also find that many independent casual restaurants give you room to play with new recipes for their menus.

3. Cruise Line 
Love to travel? Culinary positions at cruise line restaurants may be tough to land, but they certainly provide a unique experience, in which you’ll have the opportunity to interact with and serve a wide variety of people. Cruise ship restaurants may range from fine dining, to casual, to buffet-style, to cafes with pastries, sandwiches, and salads. The amount of freedom you have to experiment with the menu and specials as well as the ingredients and food you work with will depend on which types of restaurants you work for on the ship.

4. Food Hall
For the last few years, food halls have been a rising trend—a deliberate move away from the unhealthy and unexciting meals associated with traditional food courts and cafeterias. Instead, food halls appeal to individuals who are simultaneously selective and adventurous about the food they eat. A mecca for foodies, food halls usually include a diverse set of restaurants with limited menus, often featuring international cuisine and fresh, healthy ingredients. Attracting heavy foot traffic, food hall restaurants are a great place to test new recipes or restaurant concepts.

5. Food Truck
These days, it’s not uncommon to start a mobile restaurant via a food truck before starting a traditional restaurant. A food truck is a great option because of its lower overhead, staffing, and startup costs as well as its ability to meet customers nearly anywhere they are. Don’t get the wrong idea though; running a food truck isn’t a simple operation, requiring long days and an understanding of local regulations for truck parking. Business can also be influenced by slow seasons and bad weather. Similar to food hall restaurants, food trucks often have a short rotating menu that leaves a lot of room for experimentation and use of fresh ingredients.

Want to pursue a career in the culinary arts? See how the culinary arts programs at The Art Institutes can help you prepare.

By: The Art Institutes Filed under: Culinary

July 27, 2017

culinary culinary arts