Film_Production

Film& Production

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Pick your medium. Maximize your impact.

Put your ideas, your passion, even yourself out there to entertain, inform, or compel audiences. Whatever your form of expression, we’ll help you create a future.

Program Areas

Digital Film Video Program

Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

You’ll have the opportunity to learn hands-on with digital video cameras, editing, and graphics software as you tell stories in media ranging from broadcast news to motion pictures.

Digital Photography Program

Digital Photography

Harlen Capen

Digital Photography , 2015

The Art Institute of Virginia Beach, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta

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Harness the power of images as you tell stories one frame at a time, filling the world with your ideas, and insights. And making your passion your career.

Audio_Production

Audio Production

You can learn to record, edit, mix, and master digital audio as you produce live and studio music, and designing sound for film, radio, TV, web, and live performances.

Meet our Faculty

  • Image #1: Adjunct Instructor of Fashion Design Brittany Allen

    Brittany Allen

    Fashion Design

    "When creative students are really inspired, there's nothing they can't do."

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    Brittany Allen

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Believe it or not, I started college as a pre-nursing major. I hated it. I loved sewing and patternmaking, so I signed up for a few apparel classes. That inspired me to study Fashion Design, and that led me to take my professional life in the direction of creativity—and a career where I’m head designer for four brands.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My diverse career as designer of custom leather pieces, footwear and accessories, western lifestyle ready-to-wear women's apparel let me incorporate the industry into the classroom as much as possible!

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In my Draping class, students work to meet weekly deadlines leading up to their final presentation. I bring in resource and inspiration books and fabric swatches, and do hands-on draping with them so the gears are turning in their minds. They’re excited to see their personal, unique design aesthetic come to life with this project.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I try to inspire students as much as I can. When creative students are really inspired, there’s nothing they can’t do.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I believe strongly in the value of collaboration between creative students in different disciplines—for example, a fashion design student working with a photography student on a fashion shoot. There are so many creative and talented people that you can always use what someone else has to offer and learn some new ways of thinking and approaching art.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    The most important thing I teach students is to find out what it is that sets them apart from the competition. Find that unique characteristic and make yourself irreplaceable to your employer.

    What’s your one piece of advice for a student embarking on a creative career?

    In fashion, if you miss a deadline, you lose your job. So, I don’t accept late work. That’s the way it is in the industry, and it should be the same way in school.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I absolutely love teaching Fashion Design at The Art Institute of Austin!

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  • Use everything around you to create, explore, and continue to grow as a creative professional.

    Forest Bell

    Fashion Design

    "Use everything around you to create, explore, and continue to grow as a creative professional."

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    Forest Bell

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I started sewing at a very young age, and knew I was destined to be creative in some way or another. I studied painting and installation work in college, and while working on my senior show, I decided I could bring change to the world in a much more personal way. And fashion was the tool to do that.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My professional background is a key element in my classroom. The real-world experiences I share give my students a touchstone to build the foundation of each lesson; they help take their knowledge beyond theory and into application.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I believe limits should be pushed in every aspect of learning. Working in a small classroom setting—usually a studio-based environment—I can challenge each student one-on-one to go further than they might think is possible.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I make it my number one priority to ensure every student understands the struggle they’re about to embark on. A creative career isn’t an easy one. You’ll feel the lowest of lows and the highest of highs. Learn from the lows and harness the energy of the highs.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Use everything around you to create, explore, and continue to grow as a creative professional.

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  • "In fields like sound design, electronic music, and audio post, the only constant is change."

    Adam Fansgrud

    Audio Production

    "In fields like sound design, electronic music, and audio post, the only constant is change."

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    Adam Fansgrud

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I wrote and directed my first short film, the most satisfying parts of the process were working on the sound design and composing the music score. That’s when I turned my focus to sound—and I haven't looked back since.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    In fields like sound design, electronic music and audio post, the only constant is change. I’m as enthusiastic about learning as I am about teaching. And because I continue to work on real-world projects and keep current on all the technological developments, I’m able to make sure my students are ready to produce quality mixes to the latest specs.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I always encourage my students to break out of their comfort zones, whether that means mixing a genre of music they're unfamiliar with, or working in an audio discipline they didn't even know existed. Pushing themselves to broaden their interests and perspectives helps beginner students evolve into well-rounded graduates.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is critical to audio post-production and sound design. When Audio Production students work with Digital Video & Film Production students on a film project, for example, the results are usually head and shoulders above the quality of projects that don’t involve that kind of teamwork.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    It's not enough to just have passion, and it's not enough to just have drive. Students who excel are both passionate about their art and driven to take the concrete steps to realize their aspirations.

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  • Austin Chef Instructor Brad V. Harmon

    Brad V. Harmon

    Culinary Arts

    "Never give up—no matter what. Obstacles are in your way for a reason: to build character and test your grit."

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    Brad V. Harmon

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    My interest was sparked by my rich family heritage. My ancestors came from Germany as indentured servants, obtaining land in northwest Illinois through the Homestead Act. My mother grew up in the original farmhouse, and my brother and I spent every summer on the farm helping my grandfather preserve and pickle food, harvest corn and soy beans, and tend to cattle and pigs.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I try to represent all the chefs who’ve helped me develop over the years. I create a real-life scenario in the classroom so the students understand the importance of timing, communication, and teamwork. I have to put aside my own personal approach to running a kitchen and staff, because the industry seems to have a harder edge than I do, and I want to make sure my students can handle it.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In all my classes I assign research papers. Students pick their own topics based on their own culinary interest. I try not to put them in boxes, but they need to earn the opportunity to be creative by working hard, doing their homework, and being professional—which sometimes means simply showing up.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is key to generating new ideas and helping students see the big picture. I’ve had Audio students come in to record the sounds of frying, sauteeing, and the difference between a good sharp knife and a dull one. I’ve arranged a fashion show with the Fashion department so my students can provide food to match the theme. I’ve even worked with the Animation department on my own adventure—producing a cartoon.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be present. Leave your problems and issues behind you before entering a kitchen...don’t let them affect your performance. A happy chef creates happy food, which makes a happy customer.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Never give up—no matter what. Obstacles are in your way for a reason: to build character and test your grit.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My whole life I’ve been searching for a career "home." The Art Institute of Austin is my home, and everyone I work with is family.

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  • "The way to launch your career is by showing your work to anyone in the business who

    Meg Mulloy

    Digital Photography

    "The way to launch your career is by showing your work to anyone in the business who'll take the time to look."

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    Meg Mulloy

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I studied in Spain for a semester, and I think being abroad at that point in my life inspired my passion for capturing places, people, moments, and light.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Every freelance photography assignment I complete adds depth to my knowledge and experience, because each one presents new challenges and interactions. I always share stories about projects—and the tips and techniques I’ve picked up—because students need to see how problem-solving and thinking on your feet are constants in the life of a working photographer. It helps connect what they learn in the classroom to what they can expect after graduation.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring, and how do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    In my top-level Image Manipulation class, students work together to create an ad campaign. They come up with a concept together, plan their pre-production—choosing locations, casting models, sourcing wardrobe and props—and then produce the images as a team. What I love about the assignment is that they get a glimpse into a commercial shoot and see all the roles other people, beyond the photographer, play in bringing even a single image together. I let them take the lead, and I make suggestions on how to strengthen the idea or the photo, either on set or during post-production.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Working together across programs deepens students’ appreciation for the various skills and know-how it takes to create compelling work. When Photography students work with Culinary students, they see what goes into making food that doesn’t just taste delicious, but looks appetizing in a photo. Working with Graphic Design students, they see how much deep design knowledge goes into a seemingly simple logo or brand identity. And teaming up with Fashion students, they can grasp what a difference it makes on a shoot to have someone with a trained eye working as a wardrobe stylist.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I can’t emphasize enough the importance of networking. Finding work depends so much on word-of-mouth.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Doing good work and continuing to build the skills that strengthen that work are important. But the way to launch your career is by showing your work to anyone in the business who’ll take the time to look.

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  • Graphic Design Assistant Instructor Chase Quarterman

    Chase Quarterman

    Graphic & Web Design

    "The bar has been raised. You need to constantly get better."

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    Chase Quarterman

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I knew from an early age that I wanted to do something creative. In elementary school, I was always drawing characters from my favorite cartoons. In high school, I drew comic strips for the school paper and helped teach art classes to younger kids. In college, I discovered my love of design and oil painting, which grew during a semester in London. The act of making something is truly fulfilling.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My classroom is basically a client/creative setting. I am the "client," and I give creative briefs to the designers. I pull directly from my personal client experience—both good and bad—so we can discuss it class. I let them know that the profession is more than just creativity, it’s also about developing business, networking, and communication skills.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring, and how do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    One of the most difficult assignments for students is the personal branding project in Portfolio 1. It’s their chance to "brand" themselves. They design a logo—symbol and typography—for their website, portfolio, business card, and collateral. It requires some soul-searching about who the student really...they have to encapsulate their entire self into one simple mark. It seems impossible at first. But eventually, they find something to latch on to. It’s a tough challenge for them, but it’s truly gratifying for me when a student finds what they’re looking for.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    No designer is an island. The reality of the industry is that designers work with art directors, copywriters, creative directors, in-house bosses and clients of all kinds...the creative pro has to be a diplomat. I remind students that most rock bands break up because of creative differences—and the same can be true in our industry. The key is to build bridges, encourage one another, share differences of opinion, and respect the other person. It’s all about establishing camaraderie—and creating amazing work.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Have a big, visual appetite. Be inspired by film, animation, books, typography, magazines, apps, billboards, websites, nature, packaging, signage, textures, industrial design, architecture, posters, everything.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    I believe that when students know what’s out there, and they get a little intimidated by the amazing work being produced by their "competition," they work hard to get better. The bar has been raised. You need to constantly get better.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I find that the sense of community in the classroom isn’t only important for the students’ creative life, but my own. The discussions, the energy, the critiques are all catalysts for exploration...and I use them when I'm dealing with clients. I hope this creative "community" extends beyond each student's time in my classrooms.

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