Film_Production

Film &Production

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Pick your medium. Maximize your impact.

Put your ideas, your passion, even yourself out there to entertain, inform, or compel audiences. Whatever your form of expression, we’ll help you create a future.

Program Areas

Digital Filmmaking and Video Production Image

Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

You’ll have the opportunity to learn hands-on with digital video cameras, editing, and graphics software as you tell stories in media ranging from broadcast news to motion pictures.

Digital Photography Program

Digital Photography

Harlen Capen

Digital Photography , 2015

The Art Institute of Virginia Beach, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta

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Harness the power of images as you tell stories one frame at a time, filling the world with your ideas, and insights. And making your passion your career.

Meet Our Faculty

  • Andrew Allen

    Digital Photography

    "My goal is to have students create a beautiful and interesting world, filled with good design."

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    Andrew Allen

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Being accepted into the High School of Art & Design in New York City validated my talent. Being surrounded by classmates who shared my dedication and passion was just as important as the skills I learned, and it all carried over to my career as a graphic designer and photographer.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Students enjoy real-life anecdotes—both my professional successes and my mishaps. My business experiences help give my students a clearer vision of the industry and open their eyes to opportunities they may not have realized before. Quick example: I tell students how I can create artwork in Charleston, digitally send it to Quebec, Canada, and have the finished printed material shipped to New York, all the while meeting the client’s deadline and expectations.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I enjoy giving a photographic assignment to students, asking them to “imitate” a famous photographer. They pick from a list of well-known artists and tackle an image. They learn how to do “hands-on” research correctly, understand how an image was created, and produce a realistic rendition of it. They learn about history, exposure, lighting and style—and how to communicate visually and articulate their choices.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I encourage students to collaborate with their peers through interdepartmental activities and assignments. Photography students gain confidence and skills working alongside Fashion and Culinary students as subjects or models, or by documenting their apparel or their dishes. Those students learn how to product-shoot in the studio, how to take a portrait, and also to photograph on location. They all benefit from seeing each other’s creativity and learn teamwork.

    What’s your one piece of advice for a student embarking on a creative career?

    Students come to school because they’re passionate about what they’re studying. My advice to them is to learn how to cope. One thing I can guarantee is that things may not always go smoothly. But the ability to cope, along with patience, will give you a better opportunity to succeed in all aspects of life.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’m passionate about teaching. I believe my purpose is to help students gain confidence and to nurture their talents. My goal is to have them create a beautiful and interesting world, filled with good design.

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  • David Pendse

    Culinary Arts

    "It sounds simple, but a sense of urgency is critical in the hospitality industry."

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    David Pendse

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was in high school, I had a part-time job in a local ice cream shop and deli. I was fascinated watching my co-workers making ice cream from scratch, slicing meats, and making soups. There was something about it that made me feel alive and inspired.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    At the beginning of each quarter I assign students a personal project. I simply ask them two questions: What is a sense of urgency? And how do you use that as a student and in your personal life?

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    In my Senior Practicum Course in Culinary, students basically go through the steps required to open their own restaurant. Throughout the process, they interact with students in Fashion, Graphic Design, and Photography.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    My teaching style can be summed up like this: Creativity and time management. I believe time management is one of the most relevant skills needed to be successful in all aspects of life. I try to develop those skills by challenging students to create realistic goals to meet daily objectives. It sounds simple, but a sense of urgency is critical in the hospitality industry.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Every course is different, but every day my focus is the same: a hands-approach to learning through cooking demonstrations and teaching both classic and modern techniques.

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  • Lynne Riding

    Fashion Design

    "Once a student is able to see within and trust their instincts, the whole world opens up."

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    Lynne Riding

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    One of my first freelance commissions was for English Vogue. That was huge for me—giving me confidence and, as a professional, to see my name in print in Vogue!

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    We discuss the challenges of the fashion business in class—both the highs and the lows. I stress the importance of daily practice and work ethic...being responsible for yourself, your work, and your ideas. As I juggle my teaching, fashion illustration and artwork, I believe my students see and understand my commitment.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I try to instill a confidence in my students to develop their own ideas...to provide a catalyst for provoking thought and ideas. I believe that only when they have an all-consuming interest in creative work will a student be ready to question, and willing to evolve and change their original ideas, and avoid getting stuck. Once a student is able to see within and trust their instincts, the whole world opens up.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    The professional world operates by interaction. Collaboration enriches the design experience and opens students to the possibilities of what they can learn from working with diverse groups. Each student brings their own skillsets, strengths and fresh ideas, and that enhances everyone’s work.

    What’s your one piece of advice for a student embarking on a creative career?

    Have pride and respect for yourself and your work. Be willing to push yourself and to go the extra mile if necessary. Be consistent and reliable, always timely, and you’ll be called on again and again. Above all, don't give in. Persist, and it’ll happen for you.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I have many years of experience in teaching, both here and in the UK, and I’ve never worked with such a caring group of faculty, who give so much to the students.

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  • Marjory Wentworth

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

    "Creative thinking skills are quite simply problem-solving skills for life."

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    Marjory Wentworth

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a college student, I wrote a poem that wrote itself. It felt as if I was a vehicle, but I wasn't driving the car. That's when I realized the power of writing in a way I never had before.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I teach creative writing occasionally, so that’s the most direct connection I make with students. I also do a great deal of public speaking as both a writer and the poet laureate of the state, so much of my advice in that area comes from personal experience. And much of what I teach in Professional Communication comes from years of working in the public relations field.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I assign a poetry project that lets students choose material of interest to them; their grade is partly determined by their creative presentation of that material. I’ve been astonished by what they accomplish—from books to pianos to scrolls.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I care more about how they treat one another than almost anything. I want them to be good citizens in the world...to care about learning for the sake of learning. I want them to develop analytical skills that they can apply to all areas of their lives. Creative thinking skills are quite simply problem-solving skills for life.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Follow your bliss. Any writer or artist knows that they greatest joy in creativity is the process itself...the rest is frosting on the cake.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Students need to know that you care about them and their success deeply.

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