Art Institutes

Web Design &Interactive Media

I want the world to see what I can do.

As the web has become more and more a part of our lives, it’s expanded far beyond desktops. And the need for creative minds with the right blend of design and technical skills is expanding too. If you’re thinking of a future where you design everything from websites to mobile apps that keep people connected, explore our Web Design & Interactive Media degree programs. It’s where you can learn to design content for traditional and mobile web devices, including responsive design websites, mobile apps, and e-books. We’ll help you plug your creativity into the ever-changing interactive media industry. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be and pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. It’s every bit as competitive and demanding as the real world. And really, isn’t that what you’re looking for?

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty & instructors.

Degrees Offered

Certificate in Web Design & Interactive Communications

Quarter Credit Hours:
48
Timeframe:
4 Quarters

Gainful Employment

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

I'm ready to roll up my sleeves.

In our Web Design & Interactive Media degree program, you’ll start by honing your fundamental design and user skills like drawing, design, audio, digital imaging, and web technologies. You’ll apply what you’ve learned to such disciplines as media authoring, video technology, motion graphics, sound applications, and project management. You can learn several programming languages to create rich, interactive content for front-and back-end development. And you’ll explore different approaches to create new interactive experiences, including mobile apps. You’ll focus on interface design, interactivity, visual design, database design, dynamic web content design, technology, and information design and come up with creative solutions across all web-related media. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet Our Alumni

  • The Art Institute of Charleston, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta alumni Ashley Canzater

    Ashley Canzater

    Graphic & Web Design , 2015

    "Working in this type of environment helps me to perform at my best."

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    Ashley Canzater

    Marketing Assistant at SC Thrive

    Ashley Cantazer is a marketing assistant at SC Thrive, an organization that helps South Carolinians achieve stability by providing access to quality of life resources. Ashley is based in Columbia, South Carolina, and works on everything from social media posts to creating marketing materials, managing outside vendors, and updating the internal video log with stories and content.

    Ashley says that her path to SC Thrive was bumpy—her previous job did not provide the tools she needed to be successful. Today, she is working for a company that encourages her growth. She describes her workplace as diverse and family-oriented. “Everyone speaks to me as if they’ve known me for years. Working in this type of environment helps me to perform at my best. Ashley adds that being in an entry-level position requires commitment. “Every day is a learning experience. Keeping an open mind and remaining optimistic has [helped me to be] successful in this field.”

    Ashley, who in 2015 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Charleston, says that the late nights of studying helped to get her where she is today. She states that she saw the benefits of her hard work during her first internship, where she was recognized for her efforts and commended by her supervisor. “Putting forth a full effort allows me to be successful.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/397 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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  • Elliot_German

    Elliot German

    Fashion Marketing & Management , 2015

    "My education gave me the correct perspective, which enhanced my affection for an industry I was already in love with."

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    Elliot German

    President and partner at Weston Carlyle, Inc.

    Elliot German is the president and partner at Weston Carlyle, Inc. He works as a creative and fashion director and publicist, keeping clients and their organizations visible through print and digital media. “I conceptualize and build visual content and written strategies that complement marketing and promotional goals that lead to awareness and sales.” He says that his services are carefully tailored to each client’s goals—and have been developed over years of working in the industry. “I began as an executive assistant and worked my way up through volunteering, collaborations, and finally education. Experience has been my teacher and I have worked in a variety of capacities.”

    Elliot states that while school can be a challenge, dealing with the tough days prepared him for real-life work experience. He says that the most difficult decision he made in the industry was going back to school while working fulltime. “It was hard. Every class break, I was in the hallway on conference calls. [And I was away] for New York Fashion Week and still had to complete presentations to send in to instructors. There was no break! However, it taught me the value of time management, organization, when to say yes, and when to say no.”

    He runs a workshop called "Challenge Has 3 Cs" and says that one of the Cs stands for Commitment. “If you can't be accountable to you, then you're already in trouble.” Elliot adds that he’s focused on making his workplace creative so that others can explore their own commitment and dedication to the industry. “Our team members are expected to cultivate and enhance our culture at all times. We are innovators, forward thinkers, and strategists who believe in working toward a shared, common goal.” Elliot mentions that networking within the industry helps to build creativity and connections.

    Working from a home-based business, Elliot enjoys his flexible schedule. “I can go and come as I please and work from anywhere I choose. I can travel at any moment and take my office with me. I service a national clientele from Los Angeles to New York City—right from the comfort of my own home.”

    While fashion moves fast, Elliot says that technology moves even faster. He keeps up with new trends and is always learning new techniques to keep social media working for his clients. “There's always a new app or a new website. You have to stay on top of what's hot and what's not. You have to pay attention to where your audience is positioned and not only that—you also have to engage and use it."

    Prior to his current position, he worked for IMG Fashion, The Fashion Innovation Alliance, OBVIOUS Magazine, StyleHunter.com, and The Fashion 360 Conference.

    Elliot, who in 2015 earned a Bachelor of Arts in Fashion Marketing from The Art Institute of Charleston, says that his education provided the degree he needed to grow his already-established fashion career. “I started in school after seven years in the fashion industry as a freelance publicist and fashion director. I went to [The Art Institute of Charleston] because I wanted a degree in my career field. [While there], I discovered much more about the industry than I ever imagined I would. I quickly found out that as much as I knew, there was twice as much that I didn't know.” He adds that learning the history of fashion helped him to connect the “why” to the “how” of fashion. “My education gave me the correct perspective, which enhanced my affection for an industry I was already in love with.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4567 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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  • Michael_McKinney

    Michael McKinney

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production , 2015

    "I was well prepared once I started working because everything I was taught [in school] was taking place in my work environment."

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    Michael McKinney

    Film Instructor at Yo Art Inc.

    Michael McKinney is working as a film instructor at Yo Art Inc. He teaches kids within the Charleston and Berkeley County Public School systems the basics of filmmaking. The students are ages 9-14, and learn how to capture and edit footage that visually tells a complete story. “On a typical work day, I go over my lesson plans and do a final run though before going into the classroom. I then greet the kids I am instructing with a burst of enthusiasm to get them pumped up for the activities planned.” Once he provides instructions to the students, Michael walks around the classroom to individually assist them.

    Prior to starting with Yo Art Inc., Michael was an audio engineer for Tout Model and Talent Agency at Charleston Fashion Week. “This was after being on the set of a low budget film called The Annual Vacay, which lead me to hold the position of production assistant on the set of a few commercials. All of these ventures helped me to build my career, due to the professional relationships I developed.”

    Michael says that it’s important to keep goals in mind and to look toward the finish line—and beyond. Michael faced a professional challenge when he was asked to provide videography services for an engagement video—but the subjects ended up moving to a different state. Michael had a difficult time determining how to get the video to the client because the files were so large. Michael contacted the client and found that the client was willing to purchase a flash drive to send the files. “I learned that sometimes it’s ok to ask for help, even if you are being asked to do a service.”

    He builds a creative work environment by encouraging others to express their thoughts and insights. “It gives a new prospective that will have a positive impact on the overall environment.” And he adds that hearing the gratitude from his students lets him know that he’s making a positive impact. “I love what I do and when I am able to use it to help others, I am overwhelmed with the feeling of accomplishment.”

    Michael believes that continuous technical advancement means that he’s constantly stretched and challenged. “I keep up with the new ways to communicate through new mediums and I feel compelled to participate in social media as a way to keep up with the times. I soon discovered that social media is a wonderful way to connect with the world. And as it grows, so can I.”

    Michael, who in 2015 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production from The Art Institute of Charleston, says that his education provided an in-depth look at how things work in the real world. He adds that the skills he learned in school were also used in the workplace—helping him to easily transition to his new position.

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/1892 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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What Will I Study?

Study Section

Help me connect my creativity to a dynamic industry.

Our Web Design & Interactive Media curriculum keeps pace with an exciting industry—to help you hit the ground running when you launch your career. You’ll have the opportunity to build skills and understand the design principles you need to develop graphics, media, software, and programming as you study:

  • Fundamentals of Design
  • Color Theory
  • Typography
  • Image Manipulation
  • Programming Logic
  • Introduction to Audio
  • Design Concepts
  • Introduction Scripting Languages
  • Design Layout
  • Introduction to Authoring
  • Intermediate Authoring
  • Digital Illustration
  • Introduction to User Centered Design
  • Usability Testing
  • Project Management
  • Designing for Dynamic Web Sites
  • Designing for Server Side Technology
  • Integrated Information Design
  • E-Learning Design

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Web Design & Interactive Media is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we temper the tough with the support you need to make your creativity marketable. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. Here, you’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. So if your heart is telling you that you belong in a creative field, you belong here. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • Andrew Allen

    Digital Photography

    "My goal is to have students create a beautiful and interesting world, filled with good design."

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    Andrew Allen

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Being accepted into the High School of Art & Design in New York City validated my talent. Being surrounded by classmates who shared my dedication and passion was just as important as the skills I learned, and it all carried over to my career as a graphic designer and photographer.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Students enjoy real-life anecdotes—both my professional successes and my mishaps. My business experiences help give my students a clearer vision of the industry and open their eyes to opportunities they may not have realized before. Quick example: I tell students how I can create artwork in Charleston, digitally send it to Quebec, Canada, and have the finished printed material shipped to New York, all the while meeting the client’s deadline and expectations.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I enjoy giving a photographic assignment to students, asking them to “imitate” a famous photographer. They pick from a list of well-known artists and tackle an image. They learn how to do “hands-on” research correctly, understand how an image was created, and produce a realistic rendition of it. They learn about history, exposure, lighting and style—and how to communicate visually and articulate their choices.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I encourage students to collaborate with their peers through interdepartmental activities and assignments. Photography students gain confidence and skills working alongside Fashion and Culinary students as subjects or models, or by documenting their apparel or their dishes. Those students learn how to product-shoot in the studio, how to take a portrait, and also to photograph on location. They all benefit from seeing each other’s creativity and learn teamwork.

    What’s your one piece of advice for a student embarking on a creative career?

    Students come to school because they’re passionate about what they’re studying. My advice to them is to learn how to cope. One thing I can guarantee is that things may not always go smoothly. But the ability to cope, along with patience, will give you a better opportunity to succeed in all aspects of life.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’m passionate about teaching. I believe my purpose is to help students gain confidence and to nurture their talents. My goal is to have them create a beautiful and interesting world, filled with good design.

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  • David Pendse

    Culinary Arts

    "It sounds simple, but a sense of urgency is critical in the hospitality industry."

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    David Pendse

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was in high school, I had a part-time job in a local ice cream shop and deli. I was fascinated watching my co-workers making ice cream from scratch, slicing meats, and making soups. There was something about it that made me feel alive and inspired.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    At the beginning of each quarter I assign students a personal project. I simply ask them two questions: What is a sense of urgency? And how do you use that as a student and in your personal life?

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    In my Senior Practicum Course in Culinary, students basically go through the steps required to open their own restaurant. Throughout the process, they interact with students in Fashion, Graphic Design, and Photography.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    My teaching style can be summed up like this: Creativity and time management. I believe time management is one of the most relevant skills needed to be successful in all aspects of life. I try to develop those skills by challenging students to create realistic goals to meet daily objectives. It sounds simple, but a sense of urgency is critical in the hospitality industry.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Every course is different, but every day my focus is the same: a hands-approach to learning through cooking demonstrations and teaching both classic and modern techniques.

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  • Lynne Riding

    Lynne Riding

    Fashion Design

    "Once a student is able to see within and trust their instincts, the whole world opens up."

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    Lynne Riding

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    One of my first freelance commissions was for English Vogue. That was huge for me—giving me confidence and, as a professional, to see my name in print in Vogue!

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    We discuss the challenges of the fashion business in class—both the highs and the lows. I stress the importance of daily practice and work ethic...being responsible for yourself, your work, and your ideas. As I juggle my teaching, fashion illustration and artwork, I believe my students see and understand my commitment.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I try to instill a confidence in my students to develop their own ideas...to provide a catalyst for provoking thought and ideas. I believe that only when they have an all-consuming interest in creative work will a student be ready to question, and willing to evolve and change their original ideas, and avoid getting stuck. Once a student is able to see within and trust their instincts, the whole world opens up.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    The professional world operates by interaction. Collaboration enriches the design experience and opens students to the possibilities of what they can learn from working with diverse groups. Each student brings their own skillsets, strengths and fresh ideas, and that enhances everyone’s work.

    What’s your one piece of advice for a student embarking on a creative career?

    Have pride and respect for yourself and your work. Be willing to push yourself and to go the extra mile if necessary. Be consistent and reliable, always timely, and you’ll be called on again and again. Above all, don't give in. Persist, and it’ll happen for you.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I have many years of experience in teaching, both here and in the UK, and I’ve never worked with such a caring group of faculty, who give so much to the students.

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  • Marjory Wentworth

    Marjory Wentworth

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

    "Creative thinking skills are quite simply problem-solving skills for life."

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    Marjory Wentworth

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a college student, I wrote a poem that wrote itself. It felt as if I was a vehicle, but I wasn't driving the car. That's when I realized the power of writing in a way I never had before.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I teach creative writing occasionally, so that’s the most direct connection I make with students. I also do a great deal of public speaking as both a writer and the poet laureate of the state, so much of my advice in that area comes from personal experience. And much of what I teach in Professional Communication comes from years of working in the public relations field.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I assign a poetry project that lets students choose material of interest to them; their grade is partly determined by their creative presentation of that material. I’ve been astonished by what they accomplish—from books to pianos to scrolls.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I care more about how they treat one another than almost anything. I want them to be good citizens in the world...to care about learning for the sake of learning. I want them to develop analytical skills that they can apply to all areas of their lives. Creative thinking skills are quite simply problem-solving skills for life.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Follow your bliss. Any writer or artist knows that they greatest joy in creativity is the process itself...the rest is frosting on the cake.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Students need to know that you care about them and their success deeply.

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Miami International University of Art & Design alumni Marlon Munoz I'm challenged by the opportunity to take my ideas and bring them to life. Marlon Munoz
Visual Effects & Motion Graphics, Miami International University of Art & Design, 2008