Interior Design

InteriorDesign

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Build a better future.

You can learn to make things that are smarter, simpler, and better—from the tools people use to the places where they live and work.

Program Areas

Interior Design Program Image

Interior Design

Tricia Wright

Interior Design , 2015

The Art Institute of California—Sacramento, a campus of Argosy University

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You can develop the technical and creative skills to design attractive interior spaces that meet strict requirements for safety, accessibility, and sustainability.

Meet our Faculty

  • Jennifer_Ray

    Jennifer Ray

    Media Arts & Animation

    "Animation isn't just time-consuming, it's life-consuming... but the satisfaction of seeing a finished animation hit the screen makes it all worth it."

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    Jennifer Ray

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I try to incorporate the challenges I’ve faced in the industry into every project. Every due date I assign is a deadline that must be met. Students have to learn to manage their time, create a plan of action, and produce creative content for a “client.” If things go wrong, they learn how to troubleshoot. They learn to avoid trouble by working efficiently and backing up their work. I want every project to teach them not only about the subject, but about professional work practices.


    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    Some of the most real-world assignments I give are group projects. Students work together on a common creative production. For a 2D animated short, for instance, they have devise a production plan, and schedule and divide the duties. They merge their art styles into a single cohesive form. And if just one student doesn't hold up their end, the whole project suffers. They learn to communicate within a team—which for many is much harder than drawing. Each student must take responsibility not only for themselves but each other, and take a leadership role in some capacity. Each student learns their strengths and weaknesses...and what it's like to work in a studio, where you aren't just working in your own little world.


    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    In Animation, there’s a lot of crossover with other majors. Film students’ great sense for camera work and lighting is extremely helpful for Animation students working in visual effects animation and compositing. 2D animators learn by collaborating with Graphic and Web Design students on web ads and campaigns. These fields are so intertwined today that you’ll almost always have some crossover. So getting a chance to work with one another in school is a great opportunity to get a head start.


    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    This is a field where you need to be passionate and driven to succeed. Just phoning it in won't do. Don't waste a single moment, a single opportunity. Animation isn’t just time-consuming, it’s life-consuming. It’ll be difficult. You’ll be tired. You’ll be frustrated. But the satisfaction of seeing a finished animation hit the screen makes it all worth it.


    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Work hard, and don't be afraid of criticism. That’s what helps you grow.


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  • Melissa Gamez

    Graphic & Web Design

    "A good concept trumps everything else."

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    Melissa Gamez

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    For me, it’s been more of a life-long interest and enjoyment of creativity and design. I‘ve worked in architecture, animation, video games, web design, and graphic design, and I’ve enjoyed them all.


    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I always relate what I teach in class to real-world situations and experiences. Letting students know that what they’re doing has value—that it applies to the real-world— makes the work more relevant and interesting to them. They understand that this isn’t "busy work," but real skills they’ll be expected to apply in their careers.


    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching, mentoring, and pushing your students beyond their own perceived limits?

    In one of my classes, we play Pictionary®on the first day. I divide the class into two teams and have them use the white board. They’re used to working on the computer and relying on technology, so this exercise gets them out of their comfort zone and shows them they can get the same results using only their brains and a dry erase marker. It also reinforces one of my favorite teaching mantras: a good concept trumps everything else.


    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    When students leave school, they’ll be expected to work with diverse people with different skill sets, expectations, and backgrounds. By collaborating on projects here, they’re preparing for life out there.


    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    The most important thing they can do to be successful is to ask questions when they don't understand what’s expected of them.


    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be proactive!


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  • Mike_Watson

    Mike Watson

    Fashion Design

    "We do so much more than transfer knowledge. We shape individuals and help position them to succeed in life."

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    Mike Watson

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I started creating large-format silkscreen works of wearable art in college, there was a "click" of insight that I’d integrated my lifestyle and beliefs with my outward expression of art. When I was actually "seen" and recognized for my work, who I was became an integral part of what I created.


    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share stories about lessons learned, often to show how failure is a lesson—it doesn’t mean you’re a failure. I also invite professionals to provide their own perspectives. I maintain relationships by consulting and working in the industry to show my students how we never stop learning. And I show them the world of opportunities that the global nature of fashion opens up by having them create videos, mood boards, and presentations that reflect the ever-changing world of fashion.


    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    Here’s one example: I ask students to watch a brief video that reflects one of many perspectives in the industry. Once they’ve discovered what they believe to be the core concepts of the video, they share their viewpoint with another student. They get feedback, and adjust as needed. Then they develop a specific target market that the video appeals to—using industry research sites and describing their target demographically and psychographically. Next, they choose a student who reflects their target and develop a mood board designed to appeal that student. Finally, they create a PowerPoint about the video's concept, mood, and target market, all while explaining why.


    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I introduce cross-collaborative projects to add a real sense of the industry and employers’ expectations. In fashion, you constantly work with people from other professions—photographers to web designers to graphic designers. In my fashion styling class, students from all those disciplines come together to produce a photoshoot, print media, and a short video for social media. In this interconnected and interdependent world, collaboration is crucial.


    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I tell them that they each have a unique personal brand, and that it shouldn’t just inform marketing decisions, but guide their decisions in every aspect of their lives. When we fully step into who we are, we gain the confidence to be the truly brilliant person we were meant to be.


    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Learn to listen, observe, persist, and then create with purposeful intention.


    Anything else you’d like to share?

    We do so much more than transfer knowledge. We shape individuals and help position them to succeed in life.

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  • Mike_Watson

    Philip J Lloyd

    Culinary Arts

    "Be professional, be punctual, be respectful of others, and develop good communication skills."

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    Philip J Lloyd

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve always loved food. When I was 15, my father told me I should work in a restaurant so I could learn how to cook—and eat—at the restaurant's expense.


    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I have extensive experience in the real culinary world, so I’m able to share "war" stories, funny anecdotes, and tales of both success and woe to help bring the realism into the classroom.


    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In the Banquet Event Order assignment in my Garde Manger class, I emphasize that a chef needs to be well-rounded in the kitchen, the office, and the board room. The project incorporates good menu planning, recipe development and food costing for profit.


    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I help them use their strengths to overcome their perceived weaknesses.


    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration teaches students the importance of networking with folks outside their own area of focus. They learn communication skills by “educating” their student peers. When I’ve brought Photography students in to shoot culinary work, it’s helped my students better understand the importance of basic culinary skills and plating techniques. We’ve also teamed up with students from Graphic Design classes; students from each discipline act as prospective “customers” for the other.


    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be professional, be punctual, be respectful of others, and develop good communication skills.


    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Stay humble, and stay hungry for your profession and for knowledge.


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