Digital Filmmaking and Video Production Image

Digital Filmmaking& Video Production

I have a story to tell.

Whether you’re watching a movie screen, TV monitor, or your smartphone, you’re looking at the work of a team of writers, producers, directors, camera operators, lighting technicians, video editors, and digital video effects designers. If you want to join them, the place to start is our Digital Filmmaking & Video Production degree programs. We’ll guide your learning as you work with digital video cameras, editing and graphics software, and other technologies. You’ll explore how to create everything from broadcast news to motion pictures as you get ready write and direct the story of your future. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. You’ll work harder than you thought you could. But it can pay off in a future where you do what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Applied Science in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Associate of Applied Science in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4608 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

• Conceptualize, plan, execute, and deliver a production utilizing basic video techniques, and demonstrating technical proficiency that meets minimum industry standards

• Apply peer and professional critiques in the articulation and justification of aesthetic decisions in their own projects and in the evaluation of other media work

• Present and conduct themselves professionally and demonstrate an understanding of specific career paths, job responsibilities, and industry expectations

• Apply basic business practices of the media industry while maintaining legal and ethical standards

• Apply basic media-related research, writing, and verbal communication skills to their work

• Seek entry-level employment opportunities that exist in the preproduction, lighting, directing, technical, broadcast, production, post-production, and business arenas

View Academic Catalog

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/1325 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info

• Producing & Directing: Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, plan and execute different styles of media productions. Graduates will demonstrate an understanding of their leadership and collaborative responsibilities in relationship to artistic partners, crews, clients, the wider community and their own personal development

• Writing & Critical Thinking: Demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate ideas, stories and expectations in written work. Graduates will have an understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts for moving images

• Cinematography & Lighting: Demonstrate control of camera, cinematic and lighting equipment in relation to a given subject

• Sound: Demonstrate control of audio recording and sound equipment in a variety of applications. Graduates will show ability to create a meaningful relationship between image and sound

• Editing & Post-Production: Demonstrate appropriate skill in editing with attention to duration, shot to shot relation, shot to scene and relation to the whole. Graduates will demonstrate a basic understanding of design principles in use of typography, motion graphics and animation, as well as compositing and image processing skills (where applicable)

• Professionalism: Present and conduct themselves professionally and demonstrate an understanding of specific career paths, job responsibilities, and industry expectations

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

This is my dream. It's up to me to make it a reality.

In Digital Filmmaking & Video Production, you’ll have the opportunity to learn hands-on as you move from fundamentals like composition and language, color, desktop video, and photography through advanced courses including scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, producing, editing, and sound. All in an atmosphere as creative—and challenging—as the real world of filmmaking and video production. You’ll immerse yourself in an environment that’s creative and supportive as you work with the same digital media, lighting, camera equipment, and editing software used in TV studios, movie sets, and editing suites. You can learn hands-on with cameras, editing equipment, and other technology as you progress from basics like lighting, audio, and video to studio production, motion graphics, scriptwriting, producing and directing, advanced communications, and more. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

  • Deepa Ganguly

    Fashion Design

    "No matter what career you pursue, respect is key to success."

    Read More
    Deepa Ganguly

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a child, I designed my own clothes. Eventually my mom's friends started to pay for my designs. I earned a scholarship to the premiere fashion design institute in India— but I had a science scholarship too, and my parents wanted me to get a degree in microbiology. It took a lot of effort to convince my parents [to allow me to attend design school]! I have no doubt that teaching fashion was my destiny.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’ve worked in the fashion industry in a creative capacity, as well as in manufacturing, and I’ve owned and operated an evening and bridal wear shop. I’ve seen the fashion industry change along with technology. Fabrics have become more interesting and design has become more practical. I make sure to keep my students current with the industry, stressing that innovation is the key to success and that opportunities are endless.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I don’t believe in just imparting knowledge, but in molding students and their personalities. I hope I inspire them to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits at all times—to not only be knowledgeable, but to be better individuals.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration between students from different programs yields a more complete perspective. Every quarter, we host a fashion show called “Inspire” that showcases student collections. While the garments shown are designed and constructed by Fashion Design students, the graphics are planned by Graphic Design students. Photography students take pictures, video students take care of the music and videos, and so forth. Working together, combining all their talents, they make the event a success.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    No matter what career you pursue, respect is key to success. We must respect ourselves, our work, our ambition, and our dreams. Respect brings hard work, dedication and perseverance, as well as kindness, acceptance, fairness, and people skills.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Our Fashion Design department is a family. The entire industry is a family. We work together toward a mutual goal, and I’m extremely fortunate to be part of this family.

    Read More...
  • Kellie Wallace

    Interior Design

    "Be able to tell the client not just what you did, but why and how."

    Read More
    Kellie Wallace

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’d always been creative...always rearranging my room, choosing paint colors or wall coverings. In college, I’d sampled a few non-creative fields, like biology and accounting, but hadn’t settled on a major yet. My father worked at the same university and suggested interior design. I had no idea that was even a career option. But when I got into it, I realized I could not only use my creative side, but also explore the technical aspects of the built environment.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I always try to give examples of things I’ve experienced that I think students can learn from—whether it’s a mistake I once made, or just an observation about what happens in the real world.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I try to make every course I teach very hands-on. I use class assignments to show students how they can apply the material we’ve covered. To me, students do best when they’re presented with a variety of learning methods—auditory, kinesthetic, and visual. I also encourage their progress through praise for work well done.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is essential to professional growth. Recently, students in one of my classes had the opportunity to work not only with Graphic Design students, but with students from a school in Troyes, France. The project was time-consuming and the time difference between Dallas and France was challenging. But the students learned a lot by working with different programs and cultures.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    In Interior Design, it’s important to use both sides of the brain. It’s a creative profession, but students also need to tap into the logical side to deal with things like building codes and specification writing.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Use critical thinking and problem solving in everything you do. Be able to tell the client not just what you did, but why and how.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I love when a student has that "light bulb" moment where they can apply what they’ve learned.

    Read More...
  • Vicky Ardaya

    Culinary Arts

    "Being part of The Art Institute of Dallas family has allowed me to grow as a professional and an educator."

    Read More
    Vicky Ardaya

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I became a Culinary instructor, teaching diverse students from different countries, I was able to combine two careers and to grow both as a culinary professional and as an educator.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Having worked in many different countries, I’m able to share with students not just my professional experience, but insights about diverse people and cultures.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    More than any one single assignment, I’d say that my students know me as an instructor who’s always there for them, always ready to mentor them if they need me. My views on education have evolved a great deal. I try to infuse all of my experiences, ideas, values, and perspectives into everything I teach.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    I believe that two essential components for success are teamwork and good communication.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Set your goals for the short and long term, and revise them as you accomplish them.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be realistic and optimistic, believe in yourself, and have faith.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Being part of the Ai family has allowed me to grow as a professional and an educator.

    Read More...

What Will I Study?

Digital Film Video Study Section

I have the vision. I just need the skills.

The curriculum for our Digital Filmmaking & Video Production degree programs will take you from the basics to more advanced courses in an atmosphere every bit as creative and competitive as the real world of filmmaking and video production. Here are some of the areas you'll study:

  • Video
  • Lighting
  • Audio
  • Digital Imaging
  • Conceptual Storytelling
  • Editing
  • Studio Production
  • Motion Graphics
  • Digital Cinematography
  • Sound Design
  • Scriptwriting



I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Digital Filmmaking & Video Production is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Every day is a battle to get your ideas produced and noticed. And because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we’ll support you along every step of your journey. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

  • Deepa Ganguly

    Fashion Design

    "No matter what career you pursue, respect is key to success."

    Read More
    Deepa Ganguly

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a child, I designed my own clothes. Eventually my mom's friends started to pay for my designs. I earned a scholarship to the premiere fashion design institute in India— but I had a science scholarship too, and my parents wanted me to get a degree in microbiology. It took a lot of effort to convince my parents [to allow me to attend design school]! I have no doubt that teaching fashion was my destiny.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’ve worked in the fashion industry in a creative capacity, as well as in manufacturing, and I’ve owned and operated an evening and bridal wear shop. I’ve seen the fashion industry change along with technology. Fabrics have become more interesting and design has become more practical. I make sure to keep my students current with the industry, stressing that innovation is the key to success and that opportunities are endless.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I don’t believe in just imparting knowledge, but in molding students and their personalities. I hope I inspire them to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits at all times—to not only be knowledgeable, but to be better individuals.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration between students from different programs yields a more complete perspective. Every quarter, we host a fashion show called “Inspire” that showcases student collections. While the garments shown are designed and constructed by Fashion Design students, the graphics are planned by Graphic Design students. Photography students take pictures, video students take care of the music and videos, and so forth. Working together, combining all their talents, they make the event a success.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    No matter what career you pursue, respect is key to success. We must respect ourselves, our work, our ambition, and our dreams. Respect brings hard work, dedication and perseverance, as well as kindness, acceptance, fairness, and people skills.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Our Fashion Design department is a family. The entire industry is a family. We work together toward a mutual goal, and I’m extremely fortunate to be part of this family.

    Read More...
  • Kellie Wallace

    Interior Design

    "Be able to tell the client not just what you did, but why and how."

    Read More
    Kellie Wallace

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’d always been creative...always rearranging my room, choosing paint colors or wall coverings. In college, I’d sampled a few non-creative fields, like biology and accounting, but hadn’t settled on a major yet. My father worked at the same university and suggested interior design. I had no idea that was even a career option. But when I got into it, I realized I could not only use my creative side, but also explore the technical aspects of the built environment.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I always try to give examples of things I’ve experienced that I think students can learn from—whether it’s a mistake I once made, or just an observation about what happens in the real world.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I try to make every course I teach very hands-on. I use class assignments to show students how they can apply the material we’ve covered. To me, students do best when they’re presented with a variety of learning methods—auditory, kinesthetic, and visual. I also encourage their progress through praise for work well done.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is essential to professional growth. Recently, students in one of my classes had the opportunity to work not only with Graphic Design students, but with students from a school in Troyes, France. The project was time-consuming and the time difference between Dallas and France was challenging. But the students learned a lot by working with different programs and cultures.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    In Interior Design, it’s important to use both sides of the brain. It’s a creative profession, but students also need to tap into the logical side to deal with things like building codes and specification writing.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Use critical thinking and problem solving in everything you do. Be able to tell the client not just what you did, but why and how.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I love when a student has that "light bulb" moment where they can apply what they’ve learned.

    Read More...
  • Vicky Ardaya

    Culinary Arts

    "Being part of The Art Institute of Dallas family has allowed me to grow as a professional and an educator."

    Read More
    Vicky Ardaya

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I became a Culinary instructor, teaching diverse students from different countries, I was able to combine two careers and to grow both as a culinary professional and as an educator.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Having worked in many different countries, I’m able to share with students not just my professional experience, but insights about diverse people and cultures.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    More than any one single assignment, I’d say that my students know me as an instructor who’s always there for them, always ready to mentor them if they need me. My views on education have evolved a great deal. I try to infuse all of my experiences, ideas, values, and perspectives into everything I teach.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    I believe that two essential components for success are teamwork and good communication.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Set your goals for the short and long term, and revise them as you accomplish them.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be realistic and optimistic, believe in yourself, and have faith.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Being part of the Ai family has allowed me to grow as a professional and an educator.

    Read More...