Graphic & Web Design

Graphic &Web Design

I'm ready to prove myself.

Nobody has to tell you that visual communication is becoming more and more interactive. And as the lines between graphic design and web design become less defined, employers are starting to look for both graphic designers with interactive skills and web developers with solid design skills. If you’re considering either direction, our Graphic & Web Design degree programs is the place to start. We’ll guide you through the fundamentals of visual communications in both disciplines. Then you’ll choose either a print or interactive concentration as you begin to work toward a future where you can do what you love. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be and pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty* who know what it takes to succeed in the real world.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty & instructors.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Applied Arts in Graphic Design

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Associate of Applied Arts in Graphic Design

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4071 for complete Gainful Employment information for this degree.

• Design - Demonstrate versatile, aesthetic solutions of layout and design. This includes proper understanding and usage of; space, line, color, shape, texture, form and value. Typographic and photographic hierarchy structures will also be considered

• Conceptual - Demonstrate conceptual thinking through work that reflects historical and contemporary trends by answering design problems with creative visuals and writings

• Visual Communication - Express a clear message to specific demographics using various mediums

• Professional Presentation - Articulate their chosen design direction and solution by communicating their mastery knowledge of graphic design, problem solving, ethics and industry standards in a visual presentation

View Academic Catalog

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic & Web Design

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic & Web Design

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4071 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

• Design - Demonstrate versatile, aesthetic solutions of layout and design. This includes proper understanding and usage of: space, line, color, shape, texture, form and value. Typographic and photographic hierarchy structures will also be considered.

• Conceptual - Demonstrate conceptual thinking through work that reflects historical and contemporary trends by answering design problems with creative visuals and writings.

• Visual Communication - Express a clear message to specific demographics using various mediums.

• Professional Presentation - Articulate their chosen design direction and solution by communicating their mastery knowledge of graphic design, problem solving, ethics and industry standards in a visual presentation

Graphic Design Specific Outcome:

• Technical - Graduates will demonstrate, through a printed and online portfolio, the application of competencies through projects that highlight their mastery of industry software and technology in the print design field. This includes technical aspects of prepress, output, and quality reproduction as well as web design.

Web Design Specific Outcome:

• Technical - Graduates will demonstrate, through a live web site, a mastery of interactive design & development using industry software, authoring systems and/or web scripting. This includes the application and integration of advanced functionality within interactive business solutions for clients.


View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

I have the talent and the intensity. I just need the tools.

Both graphic design and web design are really about coming up with new approaches to solve problems. So you’ll start with the basics of both in areas like color, illustration, and image manipulation, then explore concept development and implementation courses. After your first year, you’ll choose a concentration. In Graphic Design, you’ll take a more traditional approach, studying product packaging, posters, art direction, and layout design. You’ll work on product packaging, posters, and interactive media, including web page design. You’ll work with professional technology, including image manipulation software and computer-aided design, then progress to art direction and strategies for designing a product, service, or message. If you choose Web Design, you’ll work across media platforms from mobile devices to desktop computers. This is screen-based visual communication involving interactive design and development using industry software, authoring systems and web scripting. You’ll explore emerging technology, work with audio and video, and more. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

  • Deepa Ganguly

    Fashion Design

    "No matter what career you pursue, respect is key to success."

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    Deepa Ganguly

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a child, I designed my own clothes. Eventually my mom's friends started to pay for my designs. I earned a scholarship to the premiere fashion design institute in India— but I had a science scholarship too, and my parents wanted me to get a degree in microbiology. It took a lot of effort to convince my parents [to allow me to attend design school]! I have no doubt that teaching fashion was my destiny.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’ve worked in the fashion industry in a creative capacity, as well as in manufacturing, and I’ve owned and operated an evening and bridal wear shop. I’ve seen the fashion industry change along with technology. Fabrics have become more interesting and design has become more practical. I make sure to keep my students current with the industry, stressing that innovation is the key to success and that opportunities are endless.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I don’t believe in just imparting knowledge, but in molding students and their personalities. I hope I inspire them to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits at all times—to not only be knowledgeable, but to be better individuals.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration between students from different programs yields a more complete perspective. Every quarter, we host a fashion show called “Inspire” that showcases student collections. While the garments shown are designed and constructed by Fashion Design students, the graphics are planned by Graphic Design students. Photography students take pictures, video students take care of the music and videos, and so forth. Working together, combining all their talents, they make the event a success.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    No matter what career you pursue, respect is key to success. We must respect ourselves, our work, our ambition, and our dreams. Respect brings hard work, dedication and perseverance, as well as kindness, acceptance, fairness, and people skills.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Our Fashion Design department is a family. The entire industry is a family. We work together toward a mutual goal, and I’m extremely fortunate to be part of this family.

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  • Kellie Wallace

    Interior Design

    "Be able to tell the client not just what you did, but why and how."

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    Kellie Wallace

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’d always been creative...always rearranging my room, choosing paint colors or wall coverings. In college, I’d sampled a few non-creative fields, like biology and accounting, but hadn’t settled on a major yet. My father worked at the same university and suggested interior design. I had no idea that was even a career option. But when I got into it, I realized I could not only use my creative side, but also explore the technical aspects of the built environment.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I always try to give examples of things I’ve experienced that I think students can learn from—whether it’s a mistake I once made, or just an observation about what happens in the real world.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I try to make every course I teach very hands-on. I use class assignments to show students how they can apply the material we’ve covered. To me, students do best when they’re presented with a variety of learning methods—auditory, kinesthetic, and visual. I also encourage their progress through praise for work well done.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is essential to professional growth. Recently, students in one of my classes had the opportunity to work not only with Graphic Design students, but with students from a school in Troyes, France. The project was time-consuming and the time difference between Dallas and France was challenging. But the students learned a lot by working with different programs and cultures.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    In Interior Design, it’s important to use both sides of the brain. It’s a creative profession, but students also need to tap into the logical side to deal with things like building codes and specification writing.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Use critical thinking and problem solving in everything you do. Be able to tell the client not just what you did, but why and how.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I love when a student has that "light bulb" moment where they can apply what they’ve learned.

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  • Vicky Ardaya

    Culinary Arts

    "Being part of The Art Institute of Dallas family has allowed me to grow as a professional and an educator."

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    Vicky Ardaya

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I became a Culinary instructor, teaching diverse students from different countries, I was able to combine two careers and to grow both as a culinary professional and as an educator.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Having worked in many different countries, I’m able to share with students not just my professional experience, but insights about diverse people and cultures.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    More than any one single assignment, I’d say that my students know me as an instructor who’s always there for them, always ready to mentor them if they need me. My views on education have evolved a great deal. I try to infuse all of my experiences, ideas, values, and perspectives into everything I teach.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    I believe that two essential components for success are teamwork and good communication.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Set your goals for the short and long term, and revise them as you accomplish them.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be realistic and optimistic, believe in yourself, and have faith.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Being part of the Ai family has allowed me to grow as a professional and an educator.

    Read More...

What Will I Study?

Graphic & Web Design Study

I'm a visual problem solver. Let's get started.

The curriculum for each concentration is hands-on, rigorous, and well-rounded. It was designed by experienced industry and education innovators to emphasize the skills you’ll need to start you career. Beginning with common classes, then exploring concentration-specific areas, you'll study:

SHARED COURSES:

  • Color & Design Fundamentals
  • Image Manipulation
  • Traditional Typography
  • Layout & Concept Design
  • Web Page Scripting
  • Digital Illustration
  • Interactive Motion Graphics

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCENTRATION:

  • Advertising Concepts
  • Form and Space, including Advanced Layout Design
  • Package Design
  • Business of Graphic Design
  • Publication Design
  • Art Direction

WEB DESIGN CONCENTRATION:

  • Information Architecture
  • Interface Design
  • Audio & Video
  • Design for Mobile Devices & Emerging Technologies
  • Web Page Design



I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Graphic & Web Design degree programs are built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we temper the tough with the support you need to make your creativity marketable. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. Here, you’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. So if your heart is telling you that you belong in a creative field, you belong here. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.