Audio_Production

AudioProduction

I want my ideas to be heard.

You don’t just listen to music. You live it. And your goal is to work in a studio, using your talent and the latest tools to create the music and sound that inform, entertain, stir, and inspire others. Our Audio Production degree programs will show you how to record, edit, mix, and master digital audio using industry-standard professional recording studio technology, including sophisticated Solid State Logic recording consoles. You’ll explore everything from producing live and studio music to designing sound for film, radio, TV, web, live performances, and other venues. With professional audio recording studios as your classrooms, we’ll work with you to develop your unique talents. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. Sound good?

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science in Audio Production

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Science in Audio Production

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/2736 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

1. Communication: Graduates have written, oral, and visual communication skills needed to communicate ideas to employers, colleagues, and clients. They effectively use technical language appropriate to audio production and also are able to communicate complex concepts to non-professionals.

2. Production: Graduates conceptualize, plan, execute, and deliver quality multitrack recordings and voiceovers, and post-production projects, integrating knowledge and application of audio theory, critical listening skills, and industry standards, using industry-related tools.

3. Problem Solving: Graduates can efficiently troubleshoot and solve problems typically encountered by audio professionals.

4. Editing and Critical Thinking: Graduates will demonstrate how editing styles, techniques, and approaches affect audience reaction; they can apply peer and professional critique as well as self-evaluation to continuously improve the quality of their work.

5. Business: Graduates evaluate and integrate the business and economic principles and practices of the audio industry in production and project management.

6. Context: Graduates can explain the scientific and mathematical foundations of acoustics and electronics, the applicability of audio production in a wide range of media, the basic principles of music theory, and the social context in which sound is produced and interpreted.

7. Professionalism: Graduates demonstrate an understanding of job responsibilities and industry standards.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

I hear what you're saying. And I'm up for the challenge.

There’s nothing passive about professional audio. It’s constantly changing to keep up with consumers and their media. And there’s a need for creative minds with the skill and energy to produce audio content for everything from television, radio and film to advertising, video games, and the web. Working in a professional recording studio using industry standard equipment, you’ll start with basic technology, theory, and industry practices, then move on to such disciplines as audio recording, live sound reproduction, and audio for video. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet our Alumni

  • The Art Institute of Michigan alumni Calvert Griffin

    Calvert Griffin

    Graphic & Web Design , 2014

    "[My education] helped me to learn how to be an effective teammate and work well with others."

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    Calvert Griffin

    Calvert Griffin is a graphic designer for George P. Johnson Experience Marketing’s office in Auburn Hills, Michigan. He creates 2D graphics for clients. Calvert says that his career path has taught him to stay humble and appreciate opportunities. He was let go from his first design job, but a month later he landed an internship with George P. Johnson. He now works for the company full time and is excited for the opportunities that his current job affords him.

    Calvert says to excel in graphic design, it’s necessary to stay focused on why you’ve chosen it as a career path. “Without [knowing your ‘why’], you are more likely to fail when the tough times arrive,” he says. Calvert encourages current students to trust the process and acknowledge that everything happens for a reason. And he helps to cultivate a creative environment within his workplace via conversation, tips, and inspiration. “Anything cool is presented to the group to push our creative thinking to another level.”

    Calvert, who in 2014 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Michigan, says that his education helped him to become a strong teammate. “I think the impact that I have on my team is bringing positive energy into any situation we may face—such as tight deadlines, last minute changes, and working late to complete projects.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3106 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • The Art Institute of Michigan alumni Carrie Doliber

    Carrie Doliber

    Graphic & Web Design , 2014

    "Feedback is not a negative aspect. It can take you places you may not have considered."

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    Carrie Doliber

    Carrie Doliber is working as a graphic and multimedia designer for Greektown Casino-Hotel in Detroit, Michigan. She’s responsible for compiling visual communications for multimedia. As a member of the marketing team, she is assigned daily tasks that are sent onto other team members for approval. “Our team works months in advance, due to the [schedule] of promotions and holiday events hosted by Greektown Casino–Hotel,” she says. Carrie enjoys putting together what she calls a design puzzle—the research process behind a design. “[I appreciate the] a-ha moment when all the puzzle pieces are assembled and a message is successfully achieved. I like the fact that each design project involves a research process which allows me to learn something new each day.”

    Carrie is proud to have returned to college as an adult. She successfully balanced having her first child while completing her degree—all while achieving honors status. “I am also proud that I pursued a career that consists of things that I am passionate about such as photography, color theory, typography, and logo design.” Carrie is inspired by the work of Vincent Van Gogh, who was known for utilizing vivid colors in his paintings. “For me, colors can be very therapeutic. In 2009, I had an opportunity to visit The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. I found it to be very moving and inspirational. It was the nudge I needed to return to [school] so that I could become a creative professional and earn a living making beautiful things.”

    Carrie earned two degrees from The Art Institute of Michigan. In 2012, she earned an Associate of Applied Science in Graphic Design and in 2014, she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design. “The first meeting I had with admissions may have been one of the most important. My advisor that day listened intently to the list of passions I had and thoroughly reviewed some sample artwork I had created. Before this meeting I was not aware how many opportunities existed for me as a creative professional.” Carrie recommends that current students be open to feedback and to understand that it’s not personal. “Feedback is not a negative aspect. It can take you places you may not have considered.”

    Read More...
  • The Art Institute of Michigan alumni Jared Bobkin

    Jared Bobkin

    Culinary Arts , 2010

    "You need to be willing to go hard 100% of the time, 5-6 days a week for 10-15 hours a day. On top of that, you have to make time to study new techniques."

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    Jared Bobkin

    When Season 15 of Fox’s “Hell’s Kitchen” premiered in January 2016, The Art Institutes community had one of its own to cheer for. Jared Bobkin was one of 18 chefs on the show competing for a Head Chef position at BLT Steak at Bally’s Las Vegas. When he’s not working to impress Chef Gordon Ramsey, Jared works as the executive chef at Local Kitchen and Bar in Ferndale, Michigan. He’s responsible for creating menus, training, scheduling, ordering, and specials.

    Jared says that the biggest challenge he’s faced in his career is starting it in his mid-twenties. “It didn’t hit me until I was 25 the kind of dedication and studying I would have to do to be as successful as possible in this field. You realize very quickly that your career will consume most of your time and you have to be ok with that,” he says. Jared also encourages young culinary artists to keep their heads down and remember their goals. “You work now to make your life easier later on. Always push yourself to be the best your can be—and better than the person next to you.”

    Jared, who in 2010 earned an Associate of Applied Science in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Michigan, says that his education provided the basic skills, techniques, and confidence he needed to succeed in the kitchen. He adds that work should be fun and focused on camaraderie. “A kitchen is more of a family than most families are, so the environment should be exciting. Experiment with purpose [and] try something out when it fits into your menu.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/1356 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • The Art Institute of Michigan alumni Rob Stone

    Rob Stone

    Culinary Arts , 2014

    "[The Art Institute of Michigan] gave me the foundation and skill set to grow as a chef."

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    Rob Stone

    Rob Stone is working as a Chef de Poissonnier at The Lark, a French restaurant in West Bloomfield, Michigan. He’s responsible for the restaurant’s seafood and fish station. Rob spends his days prepping, cooking, and plating seafood and fish entrees. He also creates daily specials and assists with menu planning. “When you’re part of a kitchen brigade and the communication between each station is flowing, there is no greater energy or rush. You are responsible for bringing together different components to make a cohesive dish,” he says.

    Rob adds that he’s also proud to be building his own catering company, Culinary Construction. His culinary career was influenced by a trip to South America. “One of the Chefs who inspires me the most is Chef Alex Atala, who runs the restaurant D.O.M in Sao Paulo, Brazil. D.O.M continues to be ranked as one of the top 10 best restaurants in the world. Chef Atala is, above all, passionate about Brazil, nature, gastronomy, and life.”

    Rob, who in 2014 earned an Associate of Applied Science in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Michigan, says that his education gave him the foundation and skills needed to grow as a chef. He adds that he also gained creativity, passion, business sense, attention to detail, commitment to quality—and the ability to work in a team environment and accept criticism. He recommends that current students take advantage of open labs. “This is your time to not only perfect the recipes given, but to experiment with different flavor profiles. Utilize the library. Save and organize every recipe you make. They will come in handy.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/1356 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • The Art Institute of Michigan alumni Sarah Green

    Sarah Green

    Baking & Pastry , 2013

    "The path ahead may not be clear to you, but every choice you make helps to carve that path."

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    Sarah Green
    Sarah Green is a technical services representative for Dawn Foods, Inc. in Jackson, Michigan. She teaches and trains cake decorators at Walmart stores in Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana. Sarah says a typical day involves going to stores and assessing the skill levels of decorators before she begins a training. A typical session covers anything from icing cakes or frosting cupcakes to borders, flowers, piping, and writing. While she makes her own schedule, she has to be on top of where she’s traveling and what she’ll be working on. “I want to make sure the decorators get the most out of the time [we have together],” she says.

    She enjoys working with many different people and personalities—and takes on the challenge of understanding how to best work with them to complete the task at hand. Sarah recommends that current students keep pushing themselves. “Cake decorating is always challenging. I have to always check out new techniques and practice and try to find out how to do it because I know I am going to be asked about it.” She tells the story of a cake video posted to social media—and how quickly she had to get up-to-speed on the technique to create it. “Within days of the video being out, I had decorators asking me to teach it to them.”

    Sarah, who in 2013 earned a Baking & Pastry Diploma from The Art Institute of Michigan, says that her education prepared her for a culinary arts career. Today, she enjoys seeing one of her students proudly show off a completed creation. “When they learn how to make the rose or when they are able to get nice square corners on the cake, that shows me that I am doing what needs to be done.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3288 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info. Read More...

What Will I Study?

Audio_Production

Music has power. I want some of that.

The Audio Production curriculum is real-world, hands-on, and focused on helping you develop the skills to produce live and studio music and to design sound for a full range of media, from concerts to film to the web. You'll study:

  • Audio Technology
  • Remote and Field Recording
  • Music Fundamentals
  • Science of Sound
  • Audio Recording
  • Broadcast Audio
  • Music and Studio Business
  • MIDI Production
  • Professional Communication
  • Digital Audio Workstations
  • Audio Post-Production
  • Audio Electronics
  • Audio Engineering
  • Studio Recording
  • Audio Mixing
  • Audio for Interactive Media
  • Sound Design
  • Streaming Media and Webcast

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Audio Production degree programs are built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we’ll support you along every step of your journey. That’s why we provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet our Faculty

  • Culinary Instructor Gregory Stroker

    Gregory Stroker

    Culinary Arts

    "My goal is to teach students to think for themselves."

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    Gregory Stroker

    What does creativity mean to you?

    I have a constant need to need to be moving, doing something constructive. I channel that energy and creativity through food; this growing and evolving industry demands creativity every day.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My professional culinary experience lets me share what I’ve learned, and I do my best to keep students current on industry trends and market demands. Working at a bakery, I’m always interacting with colleagues and managers who demand accountability and have real-world expectations, and that’s the kind of reality I pass along in the classroom.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching?

    I believe every student needs to feel they’re engaged in an individual learning experience. I focus on the needs of each student, coaching them as to why they need the course competencies and how to put them into practice. I have high expectations, which prompts them to accept the responsibility and accountability they’ll need to excel in today's culinary workplace.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    My goal is to teach students to think for themselves—and bake or cook accordingly.

    Pushing them outside their comfort zone is a big part of that. In my chocolate & sugar class, for example, I assign chocolate centerpieces in teams and sugar centerpieces as individuals. The project is designed to create a sense of accomplishment by pushing students further than they think they can go.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Success is up to each student. How much success do they want, and how hard are they willing to work for it?

    Read More...
  • Lead Faculty, Design Ken Michalik

    Ken Michalik

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Every project can become a great portfolio piece."

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    Ken Michalik

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    My second grade teacher liked one of my crayon drawings so much that she placed it on the outside wall of the classroom for parents to see. That gave me the confidence to keep experimenting with color and design. Years later, a local art college that specialized in graphic design put on a presentation for my high school art class. That was the turning point. I was so impressed that I decided that I decided to pursue a career in graphic design.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    For over 30 years in the advertising and design field, I listened to the client, to my bosses, account executives, co-workers, the mat room employees, suppliers, field personnel, everyone. And I knew that, in their own unique way, they were teaching me some great and valuable lessons, which I make a point to teach to my students.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I tell every student I teach that every project can become a great portfolio piece. I challenge students with real-life projects as a way of giving them them actual work experience. I invite design professionals to speak, co-teach, and interact with students. And I bring students to the professional workplace through field trips so they can gain first-hand knowledge of some of their career options.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    The collaborative process teaches compromise, listening skills, adaptive learning, and creative enhancement. Students learn to listen to different ways of solving the same problem—that finding the answer may be a collective process. One of my favorite classroom assignments is having students bring a product to market. One student designs the branding, another designs the logo and identity, another designs the packaging, and another puts together the tactics to reach the target market. It’s all about building character and team spirit throughout the creative process.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    The most important thing I bring to class is real-world examples. Every project I assign is relevant. I do my best to ensure that the students have the skill set, the knowledge, and professionalism to become an active and participating member of the global economy.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My students typically produce at least three professional portfolio samples they can use in interviews with prospective employers. Creating, developing, and managing a student’s portfolio is a huge responsibility that I take very seriously.

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  • Audio Instructor Michael Shellabarger

    Michael Shellabarger

    Audio Production

    "Learn how to learn. You'll never learn every single thing you'll need for your entire career in the short time you spend here."

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    Michael Shellabarger

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was a kid, trying to record sound-on-sound using an old tape deck, I saw myself doing this for a living.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Some students come in thinking they have everything already figured out. So when I relate class projects to real-world situations, it’s eye-opening for them. I try to hone the energy they have for their chosen profession without stifling any of the enthusiasm.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    One of my favorite assignments is having students record as many sounds as they can from just one item. They then use these sounds to create a sound collage or musical piece. It’s one of the most surprising and rewarding projects to be a part of.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Adding a fresh perspective is always a good way to expand your outlook on a creative project. And that’s especially the case when you’re working with students from more than just your own discipline.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Learn how to learn. You’ll never learn every single thing you’ll need for your entire career in the short time you spend here. Knowing how to pick up where we leave off is a skill that’s priceless.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    It's fun to see how, as everything changes around this school through out the year, the passion of the students stays the same.

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The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston alumni Sommer Bostick Working on game based training for the military has exposed me to things I never would be doing when I started at [The Art Institute of San Antonio]. Sommer Bostick
Media Arts & Animation, The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston, 2014