Film_Production

Film& Production

Request a Brochure

Pick your medium. Maximize your impact.

Put your ideas, your passion, even yourself out there to entertain, inform, or compel audiences. Whatever your form of expression, we’ll help you create a future.

Program Areas

Audio_Production

Audio Production

You can learn to record, edit, mix, and master digital audio as you produce live and studio music, and designing sound for film, radio, TV, web, and live performances.

Digital Film Video Program

Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

You’ll have the opportunity to learn hands-on with digital video cameras, editing, and graphics software as you tell stories in media ranging from broadcast news to motion pictures.

Digital Photography Program

Digital Photography

Harlen Capen

Digital Photography , 2015

The Art Institute of Virginia Beach, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta

View gallery

Harness the power of images as you tell stories one frame at a time, filling the world with your ideas, and insights. And making your passion your career.

Set & Exhibit Design

You can build the design and technical skills to create sets for movies, theme parks, or museums—or construct trade show booths, retail spaces, and educational exhibits.

Meet our Faculty

  • Fashion Instructor Julia Irene Szkiba

    Julia Irene Szkiba

    Fashion Design

    "My students are passionate about their future, and I'm happy to be a part of the journey."

    Read More
    Julia Irene Szkiba

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’d always loved fashion—working with textiles, drawing, and painting. I had a great high school art teacher who suggested fashion design. With his help, I pulled together a portfolio so I could get into a fashion program. It was a great "light bulb" moment. I gained some great experience during my internship with a children’s wear company, and from there was I able to work with some great firms, picking up more skills and experience, and here I am!

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I try my best to give the students a real-world sense of the industry. I share how I started out, how I’ve worked to keep my skills and experience relevant. I’m able to give them a realistic view of the industry. It’s very competitive, and you have to be creative and also have a great sense of the business side.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I go beyond using the textbook to create handouts, power points, etc. that relate more closely to what they’ll likely encounter on the job. I want them to think about where they’ll be when they’re done with school—while they’re still in school. I encourage them to look at their class assignments as potential portfolio pieces that could impress employers.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I think of the instructors who went above and beyond for me, and I try to do the same for my students.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Down the road they may work with someone with a different skill set, and what better place to learn to network than here on campus? In my Event & Fashion Show Production class, Fashion students work with students in Photography, Set Design, etc. It’s great to see them working in teams, as well as finding their own individual strengths.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I tell them not to get discouraged, to learn everything they can from instructors and classmates, and to network. I also tell them to be flexible and open to unexpected possibilities, using my own experience as an example. I got into this industry wanting to be a costume designer for films and TV, and I veered off into children’s wear. I’ve found I actually love this category.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My students are passionate about their future, and I’m happy to be a part of the journey.

    Read More...
  • Media Arts & Animation Instructor Rafael Duffie

    Rafael Duffie

    Media Arts & Animation

    "Decide what you want to do—and do it with all your heart and soul."

    Read More
    Rafael Duffie

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    My defining moment was in 2007, when I was in the Navy on a six-month tour in Iraq and Afghanistan on board the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis. As the webmaster and designer in the media department, I spent that entire tour teaching myself Autodesk Maya® from a book. That’s when I decided I wanted to work in the film and game industry and pursue creativity as my lifelong career.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    For my Sales & Event Promotion class, I assign a visual merchandising (window display) project. Students work as a team to come up with a theme, budget, props, background, visual elements, and ways to communicate their message. The students learn to work as a team, be creative individually and collectively, be aware of budgeting, and know how to communicate a message visually.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    As an example, the window assignment with visual merchandising forces students to push themselves creatively in ways they haven’t before. After completing the project, they’re really proud to have work they can add to their portfolio.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    It lets them network and learn about each other and their various projects. They get a deeper understanding of an area that may not be their strong point, learn to take responsibility for themselves and each other, and build positive relationships.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I preach to my students that it takes hard work to make an impact in the film industry— one that’s always evolving and changing, and where new skills and adaptability are the prerequisites for success. You have to be obsessed with success. You have to work tirelessly to earn your spot, because there’s so much competition.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Make the choice, trust yourself, do what makes you happy no matter what anyone else thinks. Decide what you want to do—and do it with all your heart and soul. To be great at it, you have to practice and practice until your idols are your rivals!

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I love giving back and sharing my experience with my students. This is exactly what I want to do.

    Read More...
  • Set and Exhibit Design Lead Faculty Designer Trefoni Michael Rizzi

    Trefoni Michael Rizzi

    Set & Exhibit Design

    "Creativity isn't about thinking outside the box. It's about understanding that, to be competitive in today's market, there is no box."

    Read More
    Trefoni Michael Rizzi

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    From an early age, I was always drawing and building things. After working in graphic design and arts administration, I shifted to education, spending three years counseling art students to follow their dreams and pursue their passion. That’s when I realized I wasn't listening to my own advice. So I went back to school to focus my energy on designing for the theatre. Earning my MFA in Theatre and Dance-Design turned my interest into a passion.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    As a working scenic and lighting designer, I use the same techniques in the classroom that I use professionally to help students take their design ideas from research to 3D realization. I bring examples of my own work into the classroom, and invite my students to attend productions I‘ve designed so they can expand their visual vocabulary.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In one of my final classes in the Set & Exhibit Design program, students design Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" on a stage the size of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. They need to understand not just a classic text, but how to work within the limitations of a chosen painter or illustrator’s style. As they explore the artist's work, students find nuances and details that expand their vision of the play and see how their design can incorporate the artist's visual world. The project asks them to explore the use of space on a grand scale, similar to music festivals. How do you design a space this large and still keep the focus on a single person? It’s a challenge we deal with every day in live entertainment.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is the foundation of all work in this business. From theatre to film to television to theme parks to events and festivals, no one person's vision can be realized without the work of designers, artists, craftspeople and technicians. Whenever I can, I build collaboration into my classes to provide the critical give-and-take experience students need to succeed. Working with students in programs such as Digital Film or Graphic Design or Photography, they learn that sharing their ideas in a group of creative people actually makes those ideas better.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    First and foremost, we are storytellers. In all my classes, I strive to engage my students in the process of storytelling through research, dramaturgy, textual analysis, character analysis, concept development, the psychology of space, light, color and texture, and in their designs. Their work is always filtered and critiqued through the lens of whether they’re clearly telling the story.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    It’s time management. The live entertainment design industry is an extremely fast-paced, highly competitive world. If you don't learn to manage your time well, someone else is waiting to take your place.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Creativity isn’t about thinking outside the box. It's about understanding that, to be competitive in today's creative market, there is no box.

    Read More...
  • Chef Instructor Valerie W. Barth

    Valerie W. Barth

    Culinary Arts

    "Do whatever it takes to keep moving forward."

    Read More
    Valerie W. Barth

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Some of my fondest memories are watching my mother cook. Many of the lessons I learned then are the same ones I share with my students now. I was a special education teacher in Brooklyn when I decided to deepen my knowledge of cooking and expand my kitchen skills by attending culinary school. Working in catering and as a personal chef, I realized that I could bring my greatest strengths and passions together— teaching, food, and people.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’m a storyteller. The stories I tell are about my professional experiences, and also about my learning experiences in the kitchen. Those experiences influence everything about the way I teach my students. I pass along my recommendations, warnings, successes and stumbles. And I encourage them to seek out others who can help them sort out their own paths.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I try to strike a balance between pushing and nurturing—to create a space where each student can shine in his or her own way. I do this by honoring their wide range of skills, experiences and aspirations, while pressing them to remember why they chose this school and the seriousness of that commitment. And, I reinforce that they’re each capable of making their own unique mark on the world.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    The culinary industry is built on teamwork, so my students work in teams throughout the program. I encourage them to embrace this aspect of the profession early on, and to work to achieve the kind of cohesiveness you see in the best kitchens.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I tell my students that they’re more than capable of achieving their dreams, even in the face of adversity. There will always be challenges, but they can ask for help, tap into their support systems and networks, and adjust course.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Do whatever it takes to keep moving forward.

    Read More...