Culinary

Culinary

Request a Brochure

Bring your talent to the table.

If you want to enrich the world with your talent for creating amazing cuisine—or ambiance—start by experiencing everything from kitchen skills to international flavors.

Program Areas

Baking & Pastry Program Image

Baking & Pastry

Rachel Shelton

Digital Photography , 2013

The Art Institute of Colorado

View gallery

Use your talent and passion to turn desserts into works of art. You’ll explore everything from plating to preparing confections to managing a commercial kitchen.

Culinary_Arts

Culinary Arts

Rachel Shelton

Digital Photography , 2013

The Art Institute of Colorado

View gallery

Starting with fundamentals like kitchen tools and culinary techniques, you’ll explore more than 20 of the most popular international flavors and techniques.

Culinary Management Program

Culinary Management

Prepare to run both the kitchen and the front of the house, using your passion for food and your head for business to create a memorable dining experience.

Hospitality Food and Beverage

Hospitality Food & Beverage Management

You can learn your way around both the front and back of the house while you prepare for the challenge of bringing something new to the table for demanding consumers.

Ai students welcomed at The James Beard House

Six culinary students from The Art Institutes system of schools assisted in the preparation of Thanksgiving Day dinner at New York City’s prestigious James Beard House. Learn more about how they earned this opportunity and what they hope to have learned from their five days of immersion in the Big Apple’s culinary scene.

Read More

Meet our Faculty

  • Patrick Brunelli-Guerra

    Culinary Arts

    "Never say that something is impossible. See every challenge as a new opportunity for you to grow even more."

    Read More
    Patrick Brunelli-Guerra

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve always had a passion for cooking. When I was 13 I spent my summer vacation washing dishes at my uncle’s Italian restaurant. I was fascinated by how he prepared all these intriguing, delicious dishes. Two years later, I started a culinary apprentice in Switzerland.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I always combine the basic techniques with real-life examples from my experience as an executive chef. We end each class with a recap of techniques and cooking methods, then apply them to a situation in a restaurant kitchen. It helps students understand what’s expected of them once they graduate.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In my Senior Culinary Practicum Class, I show students the final product, then work backwards and explain the steps it takes to get there. I don’t like to hand them all the answers on a silver platter; I want them to think for themselves.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Teamwork is absolutely essential. In my Senior Culinary Practicum, I engage students from Photography, Graphic & Web Design, and Interior Design to create a menu, do the marketing, and design a kitchen and dining room layout. It’s a great way for students to see the big picture.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Always be humble, learn as much as you can, and be open to others’ ideas.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Never say that something is impossible. See every challenge as a new opportunity for you to grow even more.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I firmly believe that partnering with international schools is very valuable for our students in terms of broadening their experience.

    Read More...
  • Graphic Design Instructor Zack Zwicky

    Zack Zwicky

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Work hard—and do it for yourself."

    Read More
    Zack Zwicky

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I'm not sure I've had that "defining moment," because I think of myself as someone who helps others realize their goals and potential, both through my own work and by helping students with theirs.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I give students straight talk, I bring real life clients into the classroom, and I take my students on field trips so that can actually see, touch, and smell the things our industry is made of. You can’t learn about a profession like this within the walls of a building. By experiencing those situations while in school, they learn to deal with a lot of the challenges they'll encounter once they graduate.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In Layout class, I have my students create a book about someone from a much different place—in terms of geography, religion, society, financial status, whatever. They interview that person to learn about things they've never experienced, then combine the written interview with original imagery to create a book that documents and explores the diverse world we live in.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    In my Art Direction class I like to have students from different programs work together. By the end of the class they've all learned something about each other’s craft, and they’re better prepared to work with others in the industry.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Believe in yourself. It’ll help you succeed when you don't feel you're up to the task at hand.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Work hard—and do it for yourself.

    Read More...