Culinary_Arts

CulinaryArts

I'm ready to take on the world.

For you, food isn’t just what you eat. It’s somewhere between how you express your creativity and who you are as a person. And at a time when culinary tastes are evolving and cultural barriers are disappearing, the industry needs people like you. In our Culinary Arts degree programs, you’ll be immersed in an environment that’s as close to the real world as it gets. Working in a modern, professional kitchen, you can hone your cooking skills as you focus on learning to deliver the popular international flavors and techniques today’s consumers—and employers—want and expect. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. It’ll take everything you’ve got. But it can lead to a career where you do what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Science in Culinary Arts

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Associate of Science in Culinary Arts

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/512 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

  • Establish and maintain safety and sanitation procedures
  • Prepare standardized recipes using a variety of cooking techniques which meet industry quality standards
  • Prepare a variety of international recipes utilizing the correct techniques, ingredients and equipment which meet industry quality standards
  • Describe and perform tasks related to common business practices in the culinary industry, including inventory, menu planning, cost control, and food purchasing.
  • Seek entry-level positions in commercial and institutional food service settings.
  • Define and articulate the core values of the culinary professional.
  • Describe the principles of food and beverage management.

View Academic Catalog

Diploma in Culinary Arts

Quarter Credit Hours:
55
Timeframe:
4 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Diploma in Culinary Arts

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3334 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

  • Cook and present various ethnic cuisines professionally.
  • Work as a professional team member.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

If it was easy, I wouldn't be interested.

As global cuisines become more and more prevalent, the culinary world becomes more and more competitive, fueled largely by the growing need to provide those global cuisines to demanding and discerning consumers. That’s where our program meets your future. Starting with fundamentals like knife skills, using kitchen tools, and developing culinary techniques, we’ll guide you through everything from basic cuts to managing a menu to working as part of a team. Each course builds on what you’ve had the opportunity to learn—and that curriculum includes more than 20 popular international cuisines, including Latin, Asian, and American Regional. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet Our Faculty

  • Christopher Gardner

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Find the right solution first. Pushing pixels follows."

    Read More
    Christopher Gardner

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I always liked sketching and using watercolor to express myself. After school I'd write stories to go with my drawings, using an old typewriter I'd found and brought back to life. Sometimes I’d stay up till early morning to finish my stories. Those were defining moments in my life.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I often show work I’ve done in the field, and I let my students know how their classwork work applies to a professional setting. I also share anecdotes that help put the projects I assign into a real-world context.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I feel passionate about every project I assign. I believe passion helps inspire creativity in the classroom. The projects themselves are all tied very closely to the area we’re exploring. For instance, a web development project has a very different class layout and assignments than a corporate identity class.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    It’s is a big part of learning. I want my students to understand that the best work stems from collaborative effort, and that most real-world projects involve teamwork. Here in school, an animator could help a web developer—and a web developer could help a print-based designer get a web project off the ground. Everybody needs to get involved to take a project from start to finish. When students start appreciating the true value of collaboration, that’s when they create portfolio-worthy projects.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Here’s one of the most important aspects of design that I stress: On every project, every student needs to follow a creative path that starts with pencil on paper. You need to do a lot of planning and sketching before ever using a digital application. Find the right solution first. Pushing pixels follows.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I truly love teaching, and I find that it makes me a better designer

    Read More...
  • Li Rene' Harmon

    Game Art & Design

    "Be nice to your classmates—one of them could end up being your boss."

    Read More
    Li Rene' Harmon

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I knew I was either going to be an artist or a biologist. I earned a BFA in Illustration, but I’m always looking for ways to combine the two. In fact, my Master's Thesis in Game Art is about the kelp forest and its inhabitants, and the ecosystem they form.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’m always gathering the newest information about the industry, and I share that in the classroom. I stress the importance of deadlines and naming conventions, as well as keeping up with the latest technology and pipeline strategies. I show students what I’m working on, as well as new software I’ve found that applies to the game asset world.

    How do you inspire your students?

    I think my students get inspired when they see how excited I am about learning and making things.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Keep learning. Never assume you know everything. No one does.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be nice to your classmates—one of them could end up being your boss.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I love learning from my students about current trends and the evolving culture, as well as the outside activities that inspire them.

    Read More...
  • Michelle Vietmeier

    Culinary Arts

    Read More
    Michelle Vietmeier

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Several small, creative successes made me realize this is something I enjoy. Each time I created something, whether it was food, a drawing, a painting or yarn work, I realized that working with my hands to create "something" made me feel connected to my past, present and future.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My diverse background in and out of foodservice, and my love of travel and adventure, help us look at the industry from different perspectives. We compare and contrast one type of service to another; we explore new flavor combinations, while appreciating the classics; we discover how a dish served in one country is similar to a dish served in another. By weaving my experiences—and those of my students—into the discussion, they realize they’ve chosen an exciting career field with endless opportunities.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I have students cost a recipe, calculating the number of servings, adding ingredients and measurements, researching yield percentage, doing weight conversions, doing calculations, analyzing, and finally getting a result. Throughout this assignment, I stress that good results require time and effort, and that learning is a lifelong journey. I try to instill in students that a failed attempt is not a total failure. Through our "failures," we learn how to analyze what went wrong and how to fix it.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I believe collaboration develops a stronger sense of community. Here’s an example: My Senior Practicum class put together an "Art and Brew" dinner. The Culinary students created the menu, prepared the meal and served the guests. They asked Graphic Design students to contribute themed artwork for a mini art show. And Audio Production students came up with the live entertainment. All that teamwork made the event a success, and they all learned something new from each other.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Being a professional requires a good attitude. That’s not something they can read in a book or I can teach them in a lecture. However, it can be demonstrated every day through hard work, respect for self and others, and by being a positive role model.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    What you put in is what you get out. Nobody’s going to hand you anything. You don’t get a great-paying job, a TV show, etc. without first putting in the hard work and dedication to learning your craft.

    Read More...

What Will I Study?

Culinary_Arts

This is my passion. This is my time.

There’s nothing easy about our Culinary Arts curriculum, which will immerse you in both traditional and emerging flavors from every corner of the world. You’ll cover a range of cuisines from Mexican to Middle Eastern as you study:

  • Culinary Techniques
  • Classical Techniques
  • Sanitation & Safety
  • Baking and Pastry Techniques
  • Management by Menu
  • Nutrition
  • Garde Manger
  • Foodservice Technology
  • Food & Beverage Operations Management
  • Planning & Controlling Costs
  • World Cuisine
  • American Regional Cuisine
  • Asian Cuisine
  • Latin Cuisine
  • A la carte Kitchen
  • Art Culinaire

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Culinary Arts degree programs are built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But along with that toughness comes all the support you’ll need at every step along the way. That’s why we provide the mentoring and real-world experience to help you prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field, along with opportunities to learn that go far beyond our kitchens. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • Christopher Gardner

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Find the right solution first. Pushing pixels follows."

    Read More
    Christopher Gardner

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I always liked sketching and using watercolor to express myself. After school I'd write stories to go with my drawings, using an old typewriter I'd found and brought back to life. Sometimes I’d stay up till early morning to finish my stories. Those were defining moments in my life.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I often show work I’ve done in the field, and I let my students know how their classwork work applies to a professional setting. I also share anecdotes that help put the projects I assign into a real-world context.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I feel passionate about every project I assign. I believe passion helps inspire creativity in the classroom. The projects themselves are all tied very closely to the area we’re exploring. For instance, a web development project has a very different class layout and assignments than a corporate identity class.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    It’s is a big part of learning. I want my students to understand that the best work stems from collaborative effort, and that most real-world projects involve teamwork. Here in school, an animator could help a web developer—and a web developer could help a print-based designer get a web project off the ground. Everybody needs to get involved to take a project from start to finish. When students start appreciating the true value of collaboration, that’s when they create portfolio-worthy projects.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Here’s one of the most important aspects of design that I stress: On every project, every student needs to follow a creative path that starts with pencil on paper. You need to do a lot of planning and sketching before ever using a digital application. Find the right solution first. Pushing pixels follows.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I truly love teaching, and I find that it makes me a better designer

    Read More...
  • Li Rene' Harmon

    Game Art & Design

    "Be nice to your classmates—one of them could end up being your boss."

    Read More
    Li Rene' Harmon

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I knew I was either going to be an artist or a biologist. I earned a BFA in Illustration, but I’m always looking for ways to combine the two. In fact, my Master's Thesis in Game Art is about the kelp forest and its inhabitants, and the ecosystem they form.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’m always gathering the newest information about the industry, and I share that in the classroom. I stress the importance of deadlines and naming conventions, as well as keeping up with the latest technology and pipeline strategies. I show students what I’m working on, as well as new software I’ve found that applies to the game asset world.

    How do you inspire your students?

    I think my students get inspired when they see how excited I am about learning and making things.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Keep learning. Never assume you know everything. No one does.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be nice to your classmates—one of them could end up being your boss.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I love learning from my students about current trends and the evolving culture, as well as the outside activities that inspire them.

    Read More...
  • Michelle Vietmeier

    Culinary Arts

    Read More
    Michelle Vietmeier

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Several small, creative successes made me realize this is something I enjoy. Each time I created something, whether it was food, a drawing, a painting or yarn work, I realized that working with my hands to create "something" made me feel connected to my past, present and future.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My diverse background in and out of foodservice, and my love of travel and adventure, help us look at the industry from different perspectives. We compare and contrast one type of service to another; we explore new flavor combinations, while appreciating the classics; we discover how a dish served in one country is similar to a dish served in another. By weaving my experiences—and those of my students—into the discussion, they realize they’ve chosen an exciting career field with endless opportunities.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I have students cost a recipe, calculating the number of servings, adding ingredients and measurements, researching yield percentage, doing weight conversions, doing calculations, analyzing, and finally getting a result. Throughout this assignment, I stress that good results require time and effort, and that learning is a lifelong journey. I try to instill in students that a failed attempt is not a total failure. Through our "failures," we learn how to analyze what went wrong and how to fix it.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I believe collaboration develops a stronger sense of community. Here’s an example: My Senior Practicum class put together an "Art and Brew" dinner. The Culinary students created the menu, prepared the meal and served the guests. They asked Graphic Design students to contribute themed artwork for a mini art show. And Audio Production students came up with the live entertainment. All that teamwork made the event a success, and they all learned something new from each other.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Being a professional requires a good attitude. That’s not something they can read in a book or I can teach them in a lecture. However, it can be demonstrated every day through hard work, respect for self and others, and by being a positive role model.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    What you put in is what you get out. Nobody’s going to hand you anything. You don’t get a great-paying job, a TV show, etc. without first putting in the hard work and dedication to learning your craft.

    Read More...