Alvaro Sanint

Visual Effects & Motion Graphics

Animation & Visual Effects Instructor
Miami International University of Art & Design

Miami Animation & Visual Effects Instructor Alvaro Sanint

Find what you really enjoy, and find a way to make a career out of it. Alvaro Sanint , Animation & Visual Effects Instructor
, Miami International University of Art & Design
Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

I come from a family of painters, sculptors and designers, so art runs through my veins. But I also consider myself pragmatic—I’m interested in how things work. After high school, I had to choose between engineering and art. After a ton of research and a couple of mistakes along the way, I decided industrial design was the perfect fit for me. It let me explore the arts through computers and technology, finally leading to an MFA in Computer Animation.

How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

Computer animation—like any other technology-driven field—is constantly shifting and evolving. My first-hand experience in the field lets me share the latest trends, developments and techniques. I usually find myself teaching the procedures and aesthetic structures that I’ve developed for my professional projects.

How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?


I assign my students a project that calls for them to use camera projections to re-create realistic environments in 3D space. At first, the task seems almost impossible to execute, due to the level of detail expected. But as they learn the process and discover new ways of creating the scene, they usually come to see that the “unreachable” goal is within reach.

How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

Today, most projects in the industry are incredibly complex. They require a real understanding of the big picture. When students work as members of a team, especially with peers from other programs, they get a much more realistic experience—and a better view of the big picture.

What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

I tell my students that big problems are easier to solve when you break them down into smaller parts.

What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?


Find what you really enjoy, and find a way to make a career out of it. Innovations and trends usually start with passionate people who love what they do.

Anything else you’d like to share?


I work as a producer-developer for a virtual reality production company here in Miami. Teaching helps feed my passion for sharing knowledge and learning new trends and techniques.