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The Art Institute of Tennessee — Nashville - a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta
Your creative future begins in Nashville

We prepare students for careers in design, fashion, media arts, and culinary

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The Art Institute of Tennessee — Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta

100 Centerview Drive, Suite 250, Nashville, TN 37214-3439   |    1.615.874.1067

Choose what you would like to study in Nashville

Our degree programs in the areas of Design, Media Arts, Fashion, and Culinary help you focus your talents and explore what you’re passionate about. In our collaborative environment, our instructors will guide and mentor you as we help you build the skills you need to start your creative career.

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College Bound is an 11-week college experience for high school juniors and seniors to connect with others that share your interests while taking college level courses designed to help you grow, discover yourself, and create something awesome.

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Earn a grant up to $17,496.00 (up to 20% of your tuition).

Pursue your creative degree in a growing, youthful city known for its country music scene

Pursue your creative degree in a growing, youthful city known for its country music scene

The Art Institute of Tennessee—Nashville is located in the heart of Music City USA. Here you'll be inspired by music and the arts in this growing city.

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Saturday, August 08, 2015
 Art Institutes Open House

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Courses Restaurant

Courses Restaurant is a student-run restaurant that's open to the public. Located at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Tennessee—Nashville, Courses Restaurant serves as the dining lab for students in the culinary program, offering a unique combination of real-world experience and instructional content.

Under the direction of professional culinary instructors, culinary students nourish and delight patrons while taking the final steps on their path to becoming culinary professionals. From food ordering and preparation to guest seating and serving, Courses Restaurant is a complete instructional environment for students that offers a quality dining experience to its patrons.

For reservations, please contact Courses Restaurant at 615.514.3210 or email mkjacabson@aii.edu.

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Argosy University, Nashville and The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville Demonstrate Support for Students and Employees Serving in the National Guard and Reserve Argosy University, Nashville and The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville Demonstrate Support for Students and Employees Serving in the National Guard and Reserve

(NASHIVILLE, TN, May 22, 2015)   Argosy University, Nashville and The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta, signed a statement of support with the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), a Department of Defense office that develops and maintains employer support for guard and reserve services. Dr. Roger Widmer, President of Argosy University, Nashville and Greg Chapman, Interim President of The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville signed the pledge in a ceremony held at Argosy University, Nashville on May 21, joined by representatives from ESGR.


All Argosy University and Art Institutes schools in the United States signed the pledge, declaring their commitment to highlight the unique skills that service members bring to the workforce while supporting employment opportunities for guardsmen, reservists and veterans.


By signing the Statement of Support, these schools pledge to:

Fully recognize, honor and comply with the Uniformed Services Employment and Re-Employment Rights Act (USERRA).  

Provide managers and supervisors the tools they need to effectively manage those employees who serve in the guard and reserve. 

Appreciate the values, leadership and unique skills service members bring to the workforce and encourage opportunities to hire guardsmen, reservists and veterans.

Continually recognize and support our country’s service members and their families in peace, in crises and in war. 


 “Today supportive employers are critical to maintaining the strength and readiness of the nation’s Guard and Reserve units,” said Tom Bullock, Chief of Employer Outreach for ESGR. “The ESGR Statement of Support program is the cornerstone of ESGR’s efforts to gain and maintain employer support.”


The program will increase employer support by encouraging participating employers to act as advocates for employee participation in the military. “Argosy University, Nashville and The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville are setting a high standard for all employers and educational institutions to follow by providing support of veterans, many of whom currently serve in the National Guard and Reserve,” added Bullock.

For more information, contact Director of Military and Veterans Affairs, Barbara O’Reilly, at boreilly@edmc.edu or (651) 846-3374.


About Argosy University, Nashville

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options are subject to change. Argosy University, Nashville, 100 Centerview Drive, Suite 225, Nashville, TN 37214. ©2015 Argosy University. Our email address is csprogramadmin@edmc.edu.


About The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville 

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options are subject to change. The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville, 100 Centerview Drive, Suite 250, Nashville, TN 37214. ©2015 The Art Institutes. Our email address is csprogramadmin@edmc.edu.


About ESGR

Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve is a Department of Defense office established in 1972 to develop and maintain employer support for Guard and Reserve service. ESGR advocates relevant initiatives, recognizes outstanding support, increases awareness of applicable laws, and resolves conflict between service members and employers. Paramount to ESGR's mission is encouraging the employment of Guardsmen and Reservists who bring integrity, global perspective and proven leadership to the civilian workforce.  

More information about ESGR Employer Outreach is available at www.ESGR.mil or by contacting Tom Bullock, Chief, Employer Outreach, at (571) 372-0709, or by email at thomas.s.bullock6.civ@mail.mil.

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Top Trends in Bridal Wear Top Trends in Bridal Wear

Although the latest Brides American Wedding Study shows the average cost of a wedding in 2010 was $26,501, a decrease of 5 percent from 2009, weddings continue to be big business. But many couples are opting to cut the guest list instead of big ticket items like wedding gowns.

In fact, according to the study, the average wedding gown cost $1,289 in 2010, a 20 percent increase over 2009. This is no surprise to the millions who were glued to their television sets this past April during the most talked about wedding since the 1981 royal wedding of Lady Diana to Prince Charles. Many brides are now emulating the elegant lace gown worn by Catherine Middleton, now the Duchess of Cambridge.

In addition to beautiful lace, the newest trends in wedding gowns include color, soft sleeves, short hemlines and eco-friendly materials.

Whether it is Chantilly, Alençon, Duchesse, Guipure, or ribbon, lace has become one of the hottest trends this year. “Designers at all price points have debuted collections featuring full frothy skirts, wildflowers, and lace used in both traditional and modern ways,” says Kate Campbell, department chair of Fashion & Retail Management at The Art Institute of Tampa, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design. “This particular trend parallels the more feminine, elegant trends we see in fashion everywhere – including more fitted and ladylike styles reminiscent of Grace Kelly and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.”

While not for everyone, the use of color in wedding gowns has been growing in popularity. Rich and vibrant or more subdued, color in bridal wear is everywhere. Some brides choose soft pastel colors, such as blush, rose or skin-tone. Others opt to wear vibrant hues of lavender, green and deep pink. Less bold brides are more likely to use hints of accent color on sashes, bows, embroidery, hems, necklines or beading. “The bride who chooses to add color to her dress is fashion forward and confident – it’s not for the faint of heart,” says Amber Chatelain, lead faculty for the Fashion & Retail Management program at The Art Institute of Nashville — Tennessee, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta.

Another interesting new trend in bridal wear is short gowns, especially for brides choosing destination and beach weddings. While they may be short in length, these dresses are not short on style. Some offer sophisticated laces, chic feathers or multilayered organza mini-skirts.

Soft sleeves are enjoying a comeback. Designers have debuted soft, romantic sleeves, including traditional cap sleeves in florals and tulle, modern silhouettes using vintage elements, sequin fringe and flutter sleeves, and romantic off-the-shoulder versions. “The softness and elegance of the sleeves in bridal wear mirrors today’s general fashion trends, where designers are highlighting the elegance and beauty of the female form in very soft ways,” says Charlene Parsons, who heads the fashion programs at Miami International University of Art & Design.

Eco-friendly options have also increased in popularity. “There are now numerous eco-friendly designers whose sole business is to create wedding dresses made with earth-friendly fabrics and materials, using techniques that are in harmony with the earth,” says Crystal Shamblee, department chair of Fashion Design for The Art Institute of Philadelphia. Second-hand and vintage wedding dresses are another eco-friendly choice.

Whatever fashion trends a bride chooses, one that will never go out of style is a gown that fits well, is figure flattering and makes the bride feel she’s the most beautiful woman in the world on her big day.

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Say “I Do” to Bridal Accessories Say “I Do” to Bridal Accessories

Finally found the perfect dress? Well, now its time to go from blushing bride to a fashion stand-out your family and friends will be talking about for years. Whether you prefer the classic elegance of old-Hollywood glamour or the daring innovation of the avant-garde, Fashion instructors from several Art Institutes school locations share trends in bridal accessories that can help you achieve a one-of-a-kind look on your wedding day.

Accessories can be a fun and easy way for brides to add some creativity to their style, while also showing off their personality. According to Erica Sewell, Fashion Instructor at The Art Institute of New York City, one way to look unique on your wedding day is through headpieces.

Headpieces:
Brides are trading in traditional veils in lieu of headbands, fascinators, blushers, feathers and for the daring brides, hats. Jewels and headbands, like the ones seen recently on Kim Kardashian and Alicia Keys, are another great alternative to traditional veils. Along with the jewels and headbands, Sewell is also seeing more Eastern-looking head jewelry.

Tiaras are another bridal classic that are getting a makeover. They are being replaced by birdcage veils, which are short, face-framing veils that were popular in the 40s, and fascinators, like those seen during the royal wedding.

Jewelry:
When looking at jewelry, many brides are keeping it simple or focusing on statement pieces that can be worn again and again after the wedding is over. “Your dress you wear one time. Your accessories are alifetime,” said Michelle Zabel, Fashion Instructor at The Art Institute of Washington — Northern Virginia, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta. “People are spending more on their accessories, because they can wear them again.”

Another trend in jewelry is vintage pieces. “Brides are incorporating vintage pieces from their family,” said Michael Watson, Fashion Instructor at The Art Institute of Charlotte. These pieces are not only unique, but they also have sentimental value. And, whether vintage or new, brooches and lariats are making a return to the scene, but are being used in unexpected ways. Lariats are long chains that can be wrapped around the neck several times with the ends either hanging loosely or tied into a “y” shape. According to Sewell, “If a bride has a dress with some back detail, some are using a lariat in reverse so the long part is hanging down the back.” Instead of finding brooches only on the dress, brides are now using them to accessorize their bouquets.

Feathers:
If the thought of a feathered headpiece worthy of Carrie Bradshaw’s couture-clad bride seems a little extreme for your tastes, don’t worry. Feathers are definitely having a fashion moment, and the ways to incorporate them are endless. According Watson, “feathers have transitioned into an inexpensive way to make your look unique.” Sewell agrees, noting that people are putting feathers on fascinators, clips, combs and veils. “Feathers are a big story as far as headgear,” she said.

Headpieces aren’t the only place one can find feathers. Just like brooches, they are also turning up on wedding bouquets. “Flowers have been clean, simple, minimal and accessorized with pearls, feathers and rhinestones,” said Watson.

Shoes:
What girl doesn’t love her shoes, and for today’s bride pretty much anything goes. For something unexpected, brides can add a pop of color with their shoes or even go a little trendier with lace booties. Sewell said she is also seeing shoes in general becoming less traditional and more casual. This includes taking a fashion cue from the guys. “Some brides are wearing sneakers, such as Chuck Taylors, because the grooms are wearing sneakers,” said Sewell.

To learn more about The Art Institutes schools visit www.artinstitutes.edu.

The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 45 educational institutions located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary arts professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University. See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Nashville Film Radio: "Ai Tennessee-Nashville: Nashville Film News" Nashville Film Radio: "Ai Tennessee-Nashville: Nashville Film News"

Three BFA in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production graduates from The Art Institute of Tennessee-Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta , Garrett DeLozier (2011), Derek Oxford (2011), and Hunter Pershbacher (2012), share an exclusive interview where they talk about their newest film, Two Turns Past Zero. This film recently won awards at the 54-hour Film Festival and will be featured at the Nashville Film Festival.

Read the full article here...

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