Art Institutes

Digital Filmmaking& Video Production

I have a story to tell.

Whether you’re watching a movie screen, TV monitor, or your smartphone, you’re looking at the work of a team of writers, producers, directors, camera operators, lighting technicians, video editors, and digital video effects designers. If you want to join them, the place to start is our Digital Filmmaking & Video Production degree programs. We’ll guide your learning as you work with digital video cameras, editing and graphics software, and other technologies. You’ll explore how to create everything from broadcast news to motion pictures as you get ready write and direct the story of your future. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. You’ll work harder than you thought you could. But it can pay off in a future where you do what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Associate of Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4620 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Producing & Directing: Graduates will demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, plan and execute different styles of media productions. Graduates will demonstrate an understanding of their leadership and collaborative responsibilities in relationship to artistic partners, crews, clients, the wider community and their own personal development.

Writing & Critical Thinking: Graduates will demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate ideas, stories and expectations in written work. Graduates will have an understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts for moving images.

Cinematography & Lighting: Graduates will demonstrate control of camera, cinematic and lighting equipment in relation to a given subject.

Sound: 
Graduates will demonstrate control of audio recording and sound equipment in a variety of applications. Graduates will show ability to create a meaningful relationship between image and sound.

Editing & Post-Production:
 Graduates will demonstrate appropriate skill in editing with attention to duration, shot to shot relation, shot to scene and relation to the whole. Graduates will demonstrate a basic understanding of design principles in use of typography, motion graphics and animation, as well as compositing and image processing skills (where applicable).

Professionalism:
 Graduates present and conduct themselves professionally and demonstrate an understanding of specific career paths, job responsibilities, and industry expectations.

View Academic Catalog

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

Outcomes
See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/120 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience


This is my dream. It's up to me to make it a reality.

In Digital Filmmaking & Video Production, you’ll have the opportunity to learn hands-on as you move from fundamentals like composition and language, color, desktop video, and photography through advanced courses including scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, producing, editing, and sound. All in an atmosphere as creative—and challenging—as the real world of filmmaking and video production. You’ll immerse yourself in an environment that’s creative and supportive as you work with the same digital media, lighting, camera equipment, and editing software used in TV studios, movie sets, and editing suites. You can learn hands-on with cameras, editing equipment, and other technology as you progress from basics like lighting, audio, and video to studio production, motion graphics, scriptwriting, producing and directing, advanced communications, and more. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet Our Alumni

  • The Art Institute of Tennessee - Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta alumni Ashley Hackett

    Ashley Hackett

    Graphic & Web Design , 2013

    "[My education] gave me the knowledge of graphic design and the story of printing to do what I do on a daily basis. The instructors were extremely helpful and always did what they could to grow and be a better professional."

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    Ashley Hackett

    Ashley Hackett is working as a dreamcatcher for Lithographics, Inc. in Nashville, Tennessee. She’s responsible for print sales and marketing—and spends much of her time networking. “Customer service plays a big part of my day, and at the end of the day it’s [all about] how I can help my customers get what they need.” Ashley moved into her current position quickly after starting in Lithographics’ mentoring program. Today, she says that she loves working with designers and customers to bring their designs to life. “Printing is a forever changing medium and I get to watch it evolve along with the different designed pieces that come through the doors.”

    Ashley finds creative inspiration in different printing techniques and by following print work. “My heros would have to be Heather Lose and Kenneth Hackett. Heather has always been an idol to me. Kenneth has always pushed me to follow my dreams.” She recommends that current students get hands on in their learning of the craft. “Spend a day with a pressman to see how much they put into the work that is being printed. It’s truly a fascinating process from start to finish. Experience a web press up-close start to finish.” She adds that it’s important to value the power on networking. “You never know who you will come across in your profession that could open doors for you. Study other peoples printed pieces and figure out what methods they took to achieve it. Brush up knowledge of paper. Paper knowledge goes a lot farther than you would think.”

    Ashley, who in 2013 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Tennessee—Nashville, says that her graphic design program got her involved in the design community through networking. “[It also] gave me the knowledge of graphic design and the study of printing to do what I do on a daily basis. The instructors were extremely helpful and always did what they could to grow and be a better professional.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/121 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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  • The Art Institute of Tennessee - Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta alumni Jonathan Humphrey

    Jonathan Humphrey

    Culinary Arts , 2011

    "Having this [culinary] foundation has allowed me to get the right opportunities so I can continue to grow as a chef."

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    Jonathan Humphrey

    Jonathan Humphrey is a sous chef at Mason’s at Lowes Vanderbilt Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee, responsible for assisting the executive chef in the daily operations of the restaurant. Jonathan maintains the kitchen inventory, oversees organization and cleanliness, and helps to set up and work the line. After working the line at lunchtime, he finishes prep for the evening dinner service.

    He’s also a two-time winner of the “Savor Nashville People’s Choice Award.” “The competition features 10 of the best chefs in town and some pretty sophisticated palettes, so it’s a big honor to win,” he says. Jonathan adds that he finds inspiration from competing with other chefs and learning from their culinary histories. “It’s good for young chefs like me to learn from more experienced chefs.” He counts Grant Achatz of Alinea in Chicago as a hero. Chef Achatz battled and beat stage four tongue cancer. “Every chef knows how the tongue is one of the most important tools you have as a chef, but he remained committed to excellence and was able to overcome it.”

    Jonathan, who in 2011 earned Culinary Skills Diploma from The Art Institute of Tennessee—Nashville, says that his education helped him to build a solid foundation of the fundamental techniques for cooking. He adds that it helped him learn to carry himself like a professional chef. “Having this foundation has allowed me to get the right opportunities so I can continue to grow as a chef."

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/118 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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What Will I Study?

Study Section

I have the vision. I just need the skills.

The curriculum for our Digital Filmmaking & Video Production degree programs will take you from the basics to more advanced courses in an atmosphere every bit as creative and competitive as the real world of filmmaking and video production. Here are some of the areas you'll study:

  • Video
  • Lighting
  • Audio
  • Digital Imaging
  • Conceptual Storytelling
  • Editing
  • Studio Production
  • Motion Graphics
  • Digital Cinematography
  • Sound Design
  • Scriptwriting


I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Digital Filmmaking & Video Production is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Every day is a battle to get your ideas produced and noticed. And because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we’ll support you along every step of your journey. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • Lisa Ramsey

    Culinary Arts

    "Find your passion, give it your all, and don't be afraid to make mistakes."

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    Lisa Ramsey

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Every summer I spent time in the kitchen with my grandmother making desserts from old family recipes. It gave me a sense of pride being able to carry on my family’s heritage, secrets, and love for homemade products. That love became my passion for pastry and cooking.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Having been in the industry for over 25 years, every day I can share my stories and anecdotes. I love teachable moments backed by personal experience. I take a real-world scenario and walk students through what happened and what the results were—good or bad. It shows that I’m human like them, and they tend to relate more to me.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    There’s a perfect scenario I like to use, especially in the introductory classes. Recipes must be completed as a group, and there’s usually a student who doesn’t participate as much as the rest of the team. It’s a great opportunity for the team to practice their management skills. I ask them to pretend that this student is working for them, and to step back and figure out what they need to do to engage the student, motivate them, and help them grow.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    When we open a restaurant, we need pictures, a website, marketing, and maybe a commercial, so we need to tap into the expertise of others. I encourage students to gather input from students in other programs to help with their projects. Friendships are often forged this way. After they graduate, they have resources to help them with real-life scenarios.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Accountability—for their actions, their successes, and their failures. I urge them to take accountability for your mistakes, make them teachable moments for your future, and determine what you could have done to change the outcome. Bosses admire people who are accountable. As a leader or a mentor, your staff will be more likely to follow you if you’re accountable and honest.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Find your passion, give it your all, and don’t be afraid to make mistakes. There’s nothing more satisfying than waking up every morning excited to go to work. Triumph or tragedy, make the most out of every day and learn from your experiences.

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  • Tim Hall

    Tim Hall

    Audio Production

    "Knowing the what and the how of things is good, but understanding the why is what makes you an audio engineer."

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    Tim Hall

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I knew I was hooked on audio when I was 13 and I got my first SM57 and recorded my first song. Ever since, I've done nothing but try to perfect my craft, striving for the best live sound experience and recording experience. Growing up a piano player and guitar player made it easy for me to realize that my future was in creative work. And although I sit on the other side of the glass than I originally intended (I wanted to be a musician), I couldn't imagine doing anything else.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    In my live sound classes, I often use multi-track recordings of live performances I've captured on the road with Grammy Award-winning saxophonist Kirk Whalum...I do his sound for concerts when I'm not teaching. Students see what it’s like to be mixing for a show with those talented musicians. I do whatever I can to bring the real world into class—even bringing a full band of musicians into my studio classes for six hours and treating it exactly how a session would be run here in Nashville.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring, and how do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?


    A couple of class assignments have pushed some students to really showcase their talents. One of my favorites in my Listening and Analysis class was the “pink noise” project. Using Garageband, Pro Tools, Logic, or Ableton, students created a minute-long song or soundscape using only pink noise. Obviously, they had to get really creative with effects, EQ, modulation, and automation. Some of the results were amazing—they turned pink noise into dub-step, hip hop, World War II scenes, rainstorms, TV theme songs, and video game music. Those students went above and beyond and really impressed me with their creative approach to a very difficult task.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    Collaboration is key in this industry. When putting on a live concert or show, many disciplines work together to solve common problems. Everyone thinks the sound engineer just sits in a room listening to music all day. In reality, they work with many creative people and musicians. It takes a strong personality to keep them on task—not to mention collaborating with a lighting crew, video crew, studio musicians, system technicians, installation engineers, producers, and managers.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?


    I see so many students focused on getting that “A” that they only practice what they need to pass the written test. The motivation shouldn't be for a grade, but for knowledge. The grade will usually follow—so calm down. Knowing the what and the how of things is good, but understanding the why is what makes you an audio engineer.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I got the nickname “Audio Batman” in grad school because someone was struggling with the A/V during their presentation, and I just got up and fixed it.

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