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Art Institutes

Hotel & RestaurantManagement

I want to take the lead.

When you’re at a restaurant, a catered event, or a new hotel, you notice details like the ambiance and quality of service. You appreciate the thought and strategy behind the carefully crafted dining menus. And you leave with your own ideas on how to make these places or events better. There's a spot in the industry for someone with your passion—and an intense desire to succeed. Today’s hospitality employers are looking for people who can seamlessly manage the staff, strategy, and operations required to create experiences that surprise and delight customers. If you’re up for the challenge, our Online Hospitality Food & Beverage Management degree programs are the place to start. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty* whose only goal is to help you start a career doing what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty & instructors.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science in Hotel & Restaurant Management

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
15 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes & Requirements
X

Bachelor of Science in Hotel & Restaurant Management

Outcomes & Requirements

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/200 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

  • Managerial Skills: Students are capable of explaining and demonstrating skills in key management functions such as delegation, negotiation, team leadership, communications, critical thinking and ethics. Practical applications in the management of personnel and basic human resources, financial matters including accounting, and property supervision including real estate, chattel and tools and equipment. This training encompasses the motivations for global hospitality operations, international and local marketing, legal issues and international relations.
  • Technology: Identify and use appropriate software for business presentation and communications, food costing, spreadsheets for financial/budgeting analysis, Point of Sale software and hardware, and use of the Internet for research.
  • Marketing: Perform PEST (Political, Economical, Social, and Technological) and SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) operations analyses. Develop a strategic marketing plan to include demographic analyses, sales strategy, marketing materials, and to merchandise a business concept with regards to decor, demographics, design, theme and customer buying behavior analysis. Beverage Management: Maximize customer service and profitability through price comparison, beverage tracking and control, tracking and analyzing beverage menu and sales mixes. Evaluate taste, flavor, and texture principles of proper wine and food pairing. List and identify recipes, glassware, and tools in beverage management. Examine menu marketing techniques for the sale of wines, spirits and beer.
  • Event Management: Develop a cuisine, cooking, and concept philosophy. Use of recipe programs, even checklists, customer and vendor negotiation techniques, customer profiles, and incorporation of proper event-specific cost allocation analysis. Demonstrate the use of flow management techniques for the efficient movement of guests through an event.
  • Externship: Function as a team member/leader while demonstrating a willingness to learn and share knowledge with fellow workers and team members while learning to give and receive constructive feedback in a professional manner. Observe management styles as they relate to employee empowerment, customer service, cost reduction, and employee relations.
  • Customer Service: Analyze quality customer service programs for foodservice operations with various specific and measurable results, while identifying how training of employees must accompany proper systems to provide quality customer service. Define the internal and external customer and how to not only meet but to exceed customer expectations by engraining customer satisfaction goals into the company culture.

Requirements

View Academic Catalog

Certificate in Event Management

Quarter Credit Hours:
39
Timeframe:
5 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes & Requirements
X

Certificate in Event Management

Outcomes & Requirements

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3463 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

  • Individuals in Event Planning will learn how to evaluate customer needs, identify equipment, services, and menus for the events, how to plan and execute different types of events. They will also gain knowledge of customer behavior, leadership, and managing their own event management firm.

Requirements

View Academic Catalog

Certificate in Food & Beverage Operations

Quarter Credit Hours:
39
Timeframe:
5 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes & Requirements
X

Certificate in Food & Beverage Operations

Outcomes & Requirements

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3464 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

  • Individuals in Food and Beverage Operations will learn how to evaluate customer needs, identify the personnel, equipment, and service techniques needed to serve the customers. They will also gain knowledge of customer behavior, alcohol service, leadership, marketing, finances, and management within this field.

Requirements

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

If it was easy, anybody could do it.

Consumers today have high expectations, and you want to give every customer your very best. That’s a lot of pressure. And that’s why our online hospitality degree programs provide a well-rounded education where you study everything from menu planning to marketing. It starts with the basics, from sanitation and safety to purchasing and cost control. Then we’ll teach you fundamental knowledge in hospitality operations, accounting, information systems, and leadership. We’ll help you build management skills in areas like customer service and training alcohol servers, as well as human resource management and productivity. You’ll also study recipes, techniques, and wines from around the world. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

What Will I Study?

Study Section

I have the talent. I just need the skills.

Our Hospitality Food & Beverage Management Courses will immerse you in the operation of both the front and the back of the house. You’ll explore both traditional and emerging international flavors and build relevant, marketable skills as you study:

  • Culinary Techniques
  • Classical Techniques
  • Merchandising for Foodservice
  • Hospitality Marketing
  • Catering & Event Management
  • Sales & Public Relations
  • Foodservice Technology & Information
  • Hospitality Industry & Industry Trends
  • Management by Menu
  • Nutrition
  • Purchasing and Controlling Costs
  • Garde Manger
  • Food and Beverage Management
  • World Cuisine
  • A la carte Kitchen
  • Human Resources
  • Strategic Planning and Marketing
  • Wine and Spirits Management


I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Online Hospitality Food & Beverage Management degree programs are built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But our “tough” comes with the support you need to make your creativity marketable. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. Here, you’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. So if your heart is telling you that you belong in a creative field, you belong here. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty & instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • Alisa F. Gaylon

    Alisa F. Gaylon

    Hotel & Restaurant Management

    "Learning is a lifelong journey—it doesn't end when you graduate."

    Read More
    Alisa F. Gaylon

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was always creative, and I’ve always had a passion for the kitchen, but I found myself practicing law. Shortly after 9/11, I decided to devote my time to time to working in food and hospitality instead of in a courtroom.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I relate scenarios from my professional career to the material we’re covering in class, sharing my experience as both a former restaurant owner and as a foodservice employee.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I encourage students to go in-depth with their posts and responses, relating the material either to their real-world experiences or envisioning how it might apply in their future.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    There is collaboration between students in class, and between each student and me.

    It offers a new set of eyes, a fresh opinion to consider, or an alternative way of approaching a topic. All of which helps students fine-tune their work and build their portfolios.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    You can never be over-prepared to be a business owner or manager. Learning is a lifelong journey—it doesn’t end when you graduate. Be your own cheerleader, but also be realistic about your own weaknesses so you can overcome them.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I love teaching the next generation of chefs, foodservice managers, and event planners. Seeing their progress throughout the program as they develop their business concepts inspires me.

    Read More...
  • Gaye Warren, Ed. D.

    Gaye Warren, Ed. D

    Hotel & Restaurant Management

    "Be persistent, be willing to embrace change, and be a team player."

    Read More
    Gaye Warren, Ed. D

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As far back as I can remember, I was cooking in the kitchen with my mom. I made my first pie with a lattice top at age six. For me, a commercial kitchen is like home. There’s nothing better then serving guests a wonderful meal.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    The hospitality industry is an environment of creative chaos where you learn by doing. Sharing my professional and work experience not only gives students a glimpse of what they can expect in the industry, it’s also their chance to learn from successes and failures.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    The best way to inspire students is to provide encouragement and supportive feedback, and be enthusiastic and passionate about the topic and the industry. The more personable and engaging you are as an instructor, the more students will ask questions, participate in the discussion, demonstrate a willingness to complete the assignments, and enjoy the course.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Students appreciate the opportunity to review their peers’ project work. The feedback they gain enhances the creative process and helps generate new ideas.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be persistent, be willing to embrace change, and be a team player.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    The hospitality industry can bring hard work, long hours, and crazy schedules. But it can also be incredibly rewarding and a ton of fun.

    Read More...
  • Lee Heron

    Lee Heron, Ph.D., CHE

    Hotel & Restaurant Management

    "To succeed, you need perseverance and time management."

    Read More
    Lee Heron, Ph.D., CHE

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I graduated from college.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share lots of stories from my work experience with students to help ground the material we’re learning in a sense of reality.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I have an assignment where students write their resumes and I give them verbal and written feedback. They learn how to present themselves and their qualifications to potential employers. The idea is to push students to improve their writing, critical thinking, and self-assessment skills.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Working together with other students helps students see the big picture.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    To succeed, you need perseverance and time management.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Students are my number one priority.

    Read More...
  • Robert Kern

    Robert Kern

    Hotel & Restaurant Management

    "It's okay to make mistakes—as long as you try to learn from them."

    Read More
    Robert Kern

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I went to college to study hotel and restaurant management after serving in the Army.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share stories from my own work experiences as they relate to the topics we cover in class.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    When students prepare financial reports or cost out recipes, they appreciate the individualized video feedback that shows them where they can improve. When they improve, they gain greater confidence in themselves.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    It’s okay to make mistakes—as long as you try to learn from them.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I enjoy teaching here, and I like seeing students succeed.

    Read More...