Fashion Marketing Management Hero

Fashion Marketing& Management

I'm all about the business of Fashion.

After the styles have been sketched, developed and created, someone needs to draw consumers into the boutiques and drive them to the fashion websites. If you have the energy, passion, and tenacity to make that your mission, our Fashion Marketing & Management degree program is your starting point. Working with hardware and software used in the business world, you can learn about the business of fashion—from gaining key insights into consumer behavior to managing a retail operation to finding new ways to increase in-store and online traffic. It’s about giving you the skills to compete in a fast-moving industry. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty* committed to helping put you in the front line of fashion.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science in Fashion Marketing

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Science in Fashion Marketing

Outcomes

Program Objectives

  • Examine the history of fashion
  • Develop an understanding of fabrics
  • Understand how garments are constructed
  • Compare the quality of clothing
  • Identify the components of a profit and loss statement
  • Create a six-month plan including planned sales, beginning of month stock levels, reductions, and planned purchases
  • Apply principles of fashion show production to produce a fashion show
  • Understand and develop marketing principles
  • Demonstrate the fundamentals of retail buying
  • Create a store layout and floor plan
  • Present a final portfolio
  • Develop strategic thinking concerning problems and opportunities facing contemporary global executives
  • Understand the principles of international marketing
  • Create fashion illustration concepts
  • Develop an understanding of global fashion trends
  • Discover the relationship of ethics, social responsibility and environmental issues to consumer behavior
  • Understand the principles of advertising
  • Examine the impact of technology on marketing research
  • Develop an understanding of electronic marketing
  • Demonstrate an understanding of retail business strategy
  • Compare how social issues, the economy and geography influence the design of clothing
  • Demonstrate how technology is used in the retail operational environment
  • Present a final portfolio

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/548 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Associate of Science in Fashion Marketing

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters
Outcomes

Associate of Science in Fashion Marketing

Outcomes

Program Objectives

  • Examine the history of fashion
  • Develop an understanding of fabrics
  • Understand how garments are constructed
  • Compare the quality of clothing
  • Identify the components of a profit and loss statement
  • Create a six-month plan including planned sales, beginning of month stock levels, reductions, and planned purchases
  • Apply principles of fashion show production to produce a fashion show
  • Understand and develop marketing principles
  • Demonstrate the fundamentals of retail buying
  • Create a store layout and floor plan
  • Present a final portfolio

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/549 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Diploma in Fashion Retailing

Quarter Credit Hours:
48
Timeframe:
4 Quarters
Outcomes

Diploma in Fashion Retailing

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3137 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

Don't sell me the program. Just show me the ropes.

It takes more than a love of fashion to carve out a career in such a highly competitive field. It takes confidence, drive, and hard work. And it takes the skills our program can help you build. You’ll start with fundamentals like color theory, fashion drawing, pattern-making, accessory design, and life drawing, then begin to add to your skills in areas including fabric and fiber selection, color trend analysis, and target market research. You’ll explore concept development, technical drawing and design, specialty design markets, and product development. You’ll study current designers, apparel trends & concepts, and managing the apparel product development process. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.


Meet our Alumni

  • Simone-Middleton

    Simone Middleton

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production , 2011

    "The Art Institute of Philadelphia gave me hands-on experience that impressed employers [when I was] coming out of school."

    Read More
    Simone Middleton

    Simone Middleton is a digital librarian for Fox News Channel. She’s responsible for properly selecting and annotating large volumes of media into a digital asset management system for the network’s Washington, D.C. Bureau. She also catalogues media for archiving, manages metadata, and researches and logs video assets. Prior to joining Fox News Channel, she worked at ABC 7/WJLA in Arlington, Virginia and for Light-Thief Productions in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    She was honored to recently receive both an Emmy and an Edward R. Murrow Award for her work in broadcasting as a video coordinator. “During the four years from 2012-2016, I paid my dues. I was placed through the ringer, with hard hours, tough situations, and slow growth, but I kept in mind what my goals were. I knew that I was going to be successful—and when it was my time to shine, all of the pieces of the puzzle came together.”

    She says that her most challenging work situations involve breaking news. “No breaking news situation is the same and some are harder than others. Regardless, you have to think fast and realize that the main duty is to get information on air quickly and accurately.” Because she maintains a large amount of information, she must also be certain that there are no errors made. “You learn this by trial and error and by finding a work flow that works well for you.”

    To excel in her career, Simone has taken risks and learned from her mistakes. She recommends that current students keep their heads up when things get rough—and keep pushing forward. “Learn how to be great at your job duties—and the duties of [other people on your team]. This helps you to be well-rounded and multi-talented.” She also advocates networking and sending thank you cards to those who have helped along the way. “Getting your foot in the door is hard. Staying in the industry, sometimes, is harder.” She says that when times are tough, she asks herself, “how badly do you want this?” And she encourages people new to the industry to surround themselves with like-minded people.

    Simone adds that she has a true passion for her work. “If you truly care about what you create, others around you will respect you. I think of myself as a brand. Television and video production is a very small industry. Everyone knows one another and has worked at all of the same companies.” She adds that by carrying herself as a brand, she identifies herself as someone willing to go the extra mile. Simone adds that this helps people to know both her and her dedication to being a dependable team member.

    Now that she’s proven herself within the industry, Simone is challenged to keep growing. She wants to show that she’s worthy of sitting at the same table as “industry veterans.” To help up-and-comers break into the industry, she enjoys taking interns under her wing to help them to pursue their career goals. “We all look up to someone in our lives. I can give them a guiding light and give back to those who need and want it the most.”

    Simone, who in 2011 earned a Bachelor of Science in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production from The Art Institute of Philadelphia, says that her education provided a solid foundation of experience that impressed potential employers. “[At school], you are introduced to equipment and tools [and given the opportunity to use them in a hands-on environment].” She adds that learning from teachers and advisers who are professionals within the media industry was inspiring and gave her a real-world view into the realities of broadcasting.

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/543 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • The Art Institute of Philadelphia alumni Ted Sheppard

    Ted Sheppard

    Fashion Marketing & Management , 1994

    Read More
    Ted Sheppard
    Ted Sheppard’s résumé reads like a who’s who in the fashion world. He’s worked at Lord & Taylor, Kenneth Cole, Lacoste USA, Saks 5th Avenue, and now DKNY Donna Karan, where he creates stunning, eye-catching visual merchandising at stores across the country. Ted’s passion for the arts began in childhood and continued throughout his education. While studying Fashion Marketing at The Art Institute of Philadelphia, Ted frequently traveled to attend fashion shows for Karl Lagerfeld and Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA).

    Immediately following graduation, Ted freelanced at Strawbridge & Clothier, then moved on to Lord & Taylor, working in window design. His next career step took him to Kenneth Cole, where he worked on shows for New York’s Fashion Week before moving into a more media-centered position—enabling him to coordinate production crews for television programs “Sex and the City” and “What Not to Wear.” Ted next moved to Lacoste USA, overseeing visual merchandising at boutiques across five states. His final step before achieving his position at Donna Karan was working at Saks 5th Avenue in NYC, coordinating special events and personal appearances at the store for fashion legends including Michael Kors and Giorgio Armani. In addition to his fashion career, Ted collaborates on art projects with Jerry Torre, a star in the film “Grey Gardens.”

    Ted, who in 1994 earned an Associate in Specialized Technology degree in Fashion Marketing from The Art Institute of Philadelphia, says that his education provided a solid foundation for the real world. “[It helped me] to reach all of my dreams and also helped make them come true.”

    See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/549 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info. Read More...
  • Rhonda Bell

    Rhonda Bell

    Digital Photography , 2014

    Read More
    Rhonda Bell
    Read More...

What Will I Study?

Fashion Marketing Management Study Section

I know I have to earn it. I'm ready to start.

The Fashion & Retail Management curriculum will immerse you in the business side of fashion. And from day one, it’ll test your abilities and your commitment. You'll focus in on building the tools to compete in an industry that rewards those with a knack for creative problem solving as you study:

  • Sales and Event Promotion
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Textiles
  • Brand Marketing
  • Visual Merchandising
  • Retail Operations and Technology
  • Apparel Evaluation & Production
  • Business Management
  • Financial Management
  • Merchandise Management
  • Advertising
  • Trends and Concepts in Apparel
  • I'm looking for my proving ground.

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Fashion Marketing & Management degree program is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Every day is a new challenge, a new test, a new hurdle. And because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we’ll support you along every step of your journey. That’s why we provide mentoring and real-world experience, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty & instructors.

 

Meet our Faculty

  • Chef Instructor Betsy Futryk

    Betsy Futryk

    Culinary Management

    "There's always someone else working their way up, looking to be the best. Never assume you're good enough."

    Read More
    Betsy Futryk

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was working as a sous chef training new line cooks, one of them told me how much they appreciated my efforts to inspire new cooks to grow. That’s when I realized that I loved helping others shine.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    To me, it’s very important to have a classroom that reflects the standards of the industry. I try to blend my experiences—both my accomplishments and, just as importantly, my mistakes—into my lessons.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I feel it’s my job to emphasize industry standards and traditional methods, without restricting creativity. I’ve found that, for the creative mind, the biggest obstacle is usually one’s self.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    There’s always someone else working their way up, looking to be the best. Never assume you’re good enough.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Trends change constantly, but methods are standard. The key to success is balancing the two.

    Read More...
  • Associate Professor Craig Do

    Craig Dovidio

    Media Arts & Animation

    "This is your training ground for life: make the most of it."

    Read More
    Craig Dovidio

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I made my first film when I was 12 years old. I realized then that I was creative, and I knew I needed to continue to create. I thank my father for helping me shoot for eight hours straight. He cared enough to push me when I was just learning to walk the creative path.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I bring 25,000 hours of on-location experience into the classroom, tying every bolt and cable to how it's really used in the industry. My students absolutely know I'm there to tell them the truth, and that I share the methods to do it right. I’ve been there, I’ve bought the tee shirt and the mug, and I know how to make it work. I'm their biggest cheerleader.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    All of my class assignments are based on real-world application. That's why I work regularly with the internship and career services departments. For example, on a student video production for an agency, I worked with my students to ensure they delivered the highest quality product—and that they have the best material for their portfolios. In many cases, I’ll go out with the students to meet the agency, help create the script, be present on shoots, and help edit the final video. My goal is create the most employable graduate possible.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Teamwork among students from different departments is a very important part of the success of any project. We reach out often, and always in a big way. My students work with Graphic Design students for graphics, Media Arts & Animation students for customized animations, and Audio Production students for audio recordings and editing.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I stress that this experience is the start of their professional life. Every moment in class is a percentage of the accumulated knowledge they’ll take with them to their profession. To succeed, you must first acknowledge that this is your training ground for life: make the most of it.

    Read More...
  • Emil Dejohn

    Emil DeJohn

    Fashion Design

    Read More
    Emil DeJohn
    Read More...
  • Fashion Marketing, Graphic Design, and Advertising Instructor Kirk Widra

    Kirk Widra

    Fashion Marketing & Management

    "There's no such thing as "self-made" success. It's the result of equal parts ambition, courage, and those who help you along the way."

    Read More
    Kirk Widra

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    My mother was a businesswoman. After I’d earned a Graphic Design degree and was looking for a job, she suggested that I see myself as someone who sells art and design as a service. She spent several weeks teaching me the ins and outs of the business world. After that, I felt empowered on job interviews and I’ve never looked back.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I simply share my experiences—both good and bad—with my students as learning tools and inspiration. I make sure I let them know that to be successful, you have to be wiling to make mistakes.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Those of us who are agents of change recognize that design and the arts are critical resources for transforming society and solving complex problems. We want to position ourselves at the center of public life as artists, scholars, designers, and educators. Collaboration is a natural extension of that belief.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    There’s no such thing as “self-made" success. It’s the result of equal parts ambition, courage, and those who help you along the way.

    Read More...
  • Media Arts & Animation and Game Art & Design Instructor Tim Wetzel

    Tim Wetzel

    Media Arts & Animation

    "My most satisfying moments are when students express that 'Aha!' moment—and then run with it and do amazing work."

    Read More
    Tim Wetzel

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    During a self-taught apprenticeship in 3D modeling and animation, I learned to combine art with my interest in computers and design. That was an eye-opening experience. To be honest, I was having so much fun, and it took me a couple of years to think of it as a way to make a living. Even today, much of the work I do feels more like play.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I teach working pipelines, time management, and industry standards, using my professional experiences as classroom examples. I present problems that commonly come up, as well as how client interactions affect design and other important decisions.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I challenge students to challenge themselves to work harder. And that’s what they do in my character project. It’s a series of assignments that follow the 3D character pipeline. Students create a model from reference, then UV map and texture their character using various industry methods. Creating a rig, skinning, and morph targets help students dynamically pose a character for a final presentation. Throughout the project, students learn how the process is also used for animation and 3D games.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    When students work together on a common goal, they learn to work to their own strengths and reach out to others for help in areas where they’re not as strong. They pick up valuable interpersonal tools and management skills. And when they work with student from other programs, they develop an appreciation and understanding for those disciplines.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I urge them to never stop learning, and always have a strong work ethic. I stress the importance of time management, promptness, and hard work in creating great artwork and animation. And I encourage them to accept critique with an open mind.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My most satisfying moments are when students express that "Aha!" moment—and then run with it and do amazing work. That’s when I know they’ve taken what I’ve taught them and made it their own.

    Read More...
Miami International University of Art & Design alumni Marlon Munoz I'm challenged by the opportunity to take my ideas and bring them to life. Marlon Munoz
Visual Effects & Motion Graphics, Miami International University of Art & Design, 2008