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Art Institutes

CulinaryArts

I'm ready to take on the world.

For you, food isn’t just what you eat. It’s somewhere between how you express your creativity and who you are as a person. And at a time when culinary tastes are evolving and cultural barriers are disappearing, the industry needs people like you. In our Culinary Arts degree programs, you’ll be immersed in an environment that’s as close to the real world as it gets. Working in a modern, professional kitchen, you can hone your cooking skills as you focus on learning to deliver the popular international flavors and techniques today’s consumers—and employers—want and expect. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. It’ll take everything you’ve got. But it can lead to a career where you do what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Science in Culinary Arts

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes
X

Associate of Science in Culinary Arts

Outcomes

Program Objectives

  • Understand fundamental concepts, skills, and techniques involved in basic cookery by preparing stocks, glazes, and a variety of classical and contemporary sauces and products
  • Demonstrate proficiency in all basic cooking techniques and skills
  • Demonstrate the total product utilization concept
  • Describe and explain the proper handling and storage of food and sundry products along with proper sanitation and safety procedures and principles
  • Accurately follow any given recipe and achieve the specified desired outcome
  • Explain the characteristics, functions, and food sources of the major nutrients and understand and demonstrate nutritional cooking methods including how to maximize nutrient retention in baked goods and pastries
  • Prepare a variety of baked goods, desserts and confectionaries, and demonstrate decorating, plating and display techniques
  • Identify primal, sub-primal, and market cuts of meat, poultry and seafood
  • Discuss current developments and trends in the food service industry
  • Fabricate seafood and meats into market cuts while preparing traditional, regional, ethnic, classical and contemporary hot and cold appetizers, salads and entrées
  • Identify the concepts of purchasing, receiving, and issuing practices in food service operations
  • Apply knowledge of quality standards and regulations governing food products to the purchasing function
  • Calculate overall recipe and menu cost
  • Identify principles of menu and food service facility layout and design
  • Understand the use of computers in the food service industry
  • Select and demonstrate the optimum storage conditions for all food and sundry products
  • Demonstrate and discuss nuances of cuisines and ingredients used in the various international cultures
  • Understand culinary terminology
  • Describe and demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of the front-of-the-house staff
  • Apply various cost-control functions as they relate to food service operation
  • Prepare regional, international, and classical cuisine dishes and possess an in-depth understanding of how they are utilized in restaurants and foods service industry today
  • Understand baking and pastry techniques and plating concepts used in the modern food service industry

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/540 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

If it was easy, I wouldn't be interested.

As global cuisines become more and more prevalent, the culinary world becomes more and more competitive, fueled largely by the growing need to provide those global cuisines to demanding and discerning consumers. That’s where culinary school meets your future. Starting with fundamentals like knife skills, using kitchen tools, and developing culinary techniques, we’ll guide you through everything from basic cuts to managing a menu to working as part of a team. Each course builds on what you’ve had the opportunity to learn—and that curriculum includes more than 20 popular international cuisines, including Latin, Asian, and American Regional. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet our Alumni

  • Rhonda Bell

    Rhonda Bell

    Digital Photography , 2014

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    Rhonda Bell
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  • The Art Institute of Philadelphia alumni Ted Sheppard

    Ted Sheppard

    Fashion Marketing & Management , 1994

    [It helped me] to reach all of my dreams and also helped make them come true.

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    Ted Sheppard

    Ted Sheppard’s résumé reads like a who’s who in the fashion world. He’s worked at Lord & Taylor, Kenneth Cole, Lacoste USA, Saks 5th Avenue, and now DKNY Donna Karan, where he creates stunning, eye-catching visual merchandising at stores across the country. Ted’s passion for the arts began in childhood and continued throughout his education. While studying Fashion Marketing at The Art Institute of Philadelphia, Ted frequently traveled to attend fashion shows for Karl Lagerfeld and Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA).

    Immediately following graduation, Ted freelanced at Strawbridge & Clothier, then moved on to Lord & Taylor, working in window design. His next career step took him to Kenneth Cole, where he worked on shows for New York’s Fashion Week before moving into a more media-centered position—enabling him to coordinate production crews for television programs “Sex and the City” and “What Not to Wear.” Ted next moved to Lacoste USA, overseeing visual merchandising at boutiques across five states. His final step before achieving his position at Donna Karan was working at Saks 5th Avenue in NYC, coordinating special events and personal appearances at the store for fashion legends including Michael Kors and Giorgio Armani. In addition to his fashion career, Ted collaborates on art projects with Jerry Torre, a star in the film “Grey Gardens.”

    Ted, who in 1994 earned an Associate in Specialized Technology degree in Fashion Marketing from The Art Institute of Philadelphia, says that his education provided a solid foundation for the real world. “[It helped me] to reach all of my dreams and also helped make them come true.”

    See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/549 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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What Will I Study?

Culinary_Arts

This is my passion. This is my time.

There’s nothing easy about our Culinary Arts curriculum, which will immerse you in both traditional and emerging flavors from every corner of the world. You’ll cover a range of cuisines from Mexican to Middle Eastern as you study:

  • Culinary Techniques
  • Classical Techniques
  • Sanitation & Safety
  • Baking and Pastry Techniques
  • Management by Menu
  • Nutrition
  • Garde Manger
  • Foodservice Technology
  • Food & Beverage Operations Management
  • Planning & Controlling Costs
  • World Cuisine
  • American Regional Cuisine
  • Asian Cuisine
  • Latin Cuisine
  • A la carte Kitchen
  • Art Culinaire

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institute of Philadelphia, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Culinary Arts School is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But along with that toughness comes all the support you’ll need at every step along the way. That’s why we provide the mentoring and real-world experience to help you prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field, along with opportunities to learn that go far beyond our kitchens. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet our Faculty

  • Chef Instructor Betsy Futryk

    Betsy Futryk

    Culinary Management

    "There's always someone else working their way up, looking to be the best. Never assume you're good enough."

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    Betsy Futryk

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was working as a sous chef training new line cooks, one of them told me how much they appreciated my efforts to inspire new cooks to grow. That’s when I realized that I loved helping others shine.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    To me, it’s very important to have a classroom that reflects the standards of the industry. I try to blend my experiences—both my accomplishments and, just as importantly, my mistakes—into my lessons.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I feel it’s my job to emphasize industry standards and traditional methods, without restricting creativity. I’ve found that, for the creative mind, the biggest obstacle is usually one’s self.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    There’s always someone else working their way up, looking to be the best. Never assume you’re good enough.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Trends change constantly, but methods are standard. The key to success is balancing the two.

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  • Associate Professor Craig Do

    Craig Dovidio

    Media Arts & Animation

    "This is your training ground for life: make the most of it."

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    Craig Dovidio

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I made my first film when I was 12 years old. I realized then that I was creative, and I knew I needed to continue to create. I thank my father for helping me shoot for eight hours straight. He cared enough to push me when I was just learning to walk the creative path.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I bring 25,000 hours of on-location experience into the classroom, tying every bolt and cable to how it's really used in the industry. My students absolutely know I'm there to tell them the truth, and that I share the methods to do it right. I’ve been there, I’ve bought the tee shirt and the mug, and I know how to make it work. I'm their biggest cheerleader.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    All of my class assignments are based on real-world application. That's why I work regularly with the internship and career services departments. For example, on a student video production for an agency, I worked with my students to ensure they delivered the highest quality product—and that they have the best material for their portfolios. In many cases, I’ll go out with the students to meet the agency, help create the script, be present on shoots, and help edit the final video. My goal is create the most employable graduate possible.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Teamwork among students from different departments is a very important part of the success of any project. We reach out often, and always in a big way. My students work with Graphic Design students for graphics, Media Arts & Animation students for customized animations, and Audio Production students for audio recordings and editing.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I stress that this experience is the start of their professional life. Every moment in class is a percentage of the accumulated knowledge they’ll take with them to their profession. To succeed, you must first acknowledge that this is your training ground for life: make the most of it.

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  • Emil Dejohn

    Emil DeJohn

    Fashion Design

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    Emil DeJohn
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  • Fashion Marketing, Graphic Design, and Advertising Instructor Kirk Widra

    Kirk Widra

    Fashion Marketing & Management

    "There's no such thing as "self-made" success. It's the result of equal parts ambition, courage, and those who help you along the way."

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    Kirk Widra

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    My mother was a businesswoman. After I’d earned a Graphic Design degree and was looking for a job, she suggested that I see myself as someone who sells art and design as a service. She spent several weeks teaching me the ins and outs of the business world. After that, I felt empowered on job interviews and I’ve never looked back.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I simply share my experiences—both good and bad—with my students as learning tools and inspiration. I make sure I let them know that to be successful, you have to be wiling to make mistakes.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Those of us who are agents of change recognize that design and the arts are critical resources for transforming society and solving complex problems. We want to position ourselves at the center of public life as artists, scholars, designers, and educators. Collaboration is a natural extension of that belief.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    There’s no such thing as “self-made" success. It’s the result of equal parts ambition, courage, and those who help you along the way.

    Read More...
  • Media Arts & Animation and Game Art & Design Instructor Tim Wetzel

    Tim Wetzel

    Media Arts & Animation

    "My most satisfying moments are when students express that 'Aha!' moment—and then run with it and do amazing work."

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    Tim Wetzel

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    During a self-taught apprenticeship in 3D modeling and animation, I learned to combine art with my interest in computers and design. That was an eye-opening experience. To be honest, I was having so much fun, and it took me a couple of years to think of it as a way to make a living. Even today, much of the work I do feels more like play.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I teach working pipelines, time management, and industry standards, using my professional experiences as classroom examples. I present problems that commonly come up, as well as how client interactions affect design and other important decisions.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I challenge students to challenge themselves to work harder. And that’s what they do in my character project. It’s a series of assignments that follow the 3D character pipeline. Students create a model from reference, then UV map and texture their character using various industry methods. Creating a rig, skinning, and morph targets help students dynamically pose a character for a final presentation. Throughout the project, students learn how the process is also used for animation and 3D games.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    When students work together on a common goal, they learn to work to their own strengths and reach out to others for help in areas where they’re not as strong. They pick up valuable interpersonal tools and management skills. And when they work with student from other programs, they develop an appreciation and understanding for those disciplines.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I urge them to never stop learning, and always have a strong work ethic. I stress the importance of time management, promptness, and hard work in creating great artwork and animation. And I encourage them to accept critique with an open mind.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My most satisfying moments are when students express that "Aha!" moment—and then run with it and do amazing work. That’s when I know they’ve taken what I’ve taught them and made it their own.

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The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston alumni Sommer Bostick Working on game based training for the military has exposed me to things I never would be doing when I started at [The Art Institute of San Antonio]. Sommer Bostick
Media Arts & Animation, The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston, 2014