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The Art Institute of Pittsburgh
Your creative future begins in Pittsburgh

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The Art Institute of Pittsburgh

420 Boulevard of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-1301   |    1.412.263.6600

"I found what makes me happy, what I love, what makes me want to wake up every single day."

-- Angelo Rosa, Associate of Applied Science, Fashion Design, The Art Institute of New York City, 2014

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Choose what you would like to study in Pittsburgh

Our degree programs in the areas of Design, Media Arts, Fashion, and Culinary help you focus your talents and explore what you’re passionate about. In our collaborative environment, our instructors will guide and mentor you as we help you build the skills you need to start your creative career.

Non-Credit Courses

Hands-on classes and workshops in the world of food, photography, art, fashion, and more!

Get Creative at The Art Institutes | Creative Classes open to teens and adults.
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Earn a grant up to $17,532.00 (up to 20% of your tuition).

Over 90 years of educating creative professionals

Over 90 years of educating creative professionals

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh has a rich history in our great city's creative and cultural community. Once you're here, you can feel the energy of our students and faculty — and of a city that's witnessed a renaissance in the past forty years.

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Saturday, May 30, 2015
 Art Institutes Open House

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Explore our community. It's all here .
The only thing missing is you.

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A Taste of Art

Our facility also includes the Taste of Art Restaurant, the dining lab for students in our culinary program. This restaurant is student-run and open to the public, and was rated "Best Kept Secret" in Pittsburgh Magazine's Best Restaurants in Pittsburgh Reader’s Poll. The menu reflects international cuisine; this month it might be Thai and the next time you visit you may experience Egyptian cuisine.

Under the supervision of Chef Shawn Culp and an experienced and credentialed faculty of chef instructors, students create bistro-style dishes in the kitchen and run all aspects of the dining room.  From food ordering and preparation to guest seating and serving, Taste of Art is a complete instructional environment for students that offers a quality dining experience to its patrons. 

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News and events

Mint Lightens and Brightens Summer Dishes Mint Lightens and Brightens Summer Dishes

(June 2014)  The Kentucky Derby, held the first Saturday in May, may be responsible for making mint the king of summertime drinks. Along with big hats, the Derby is famous for its mint juleps, kicking off the warm weather season.


This year, mint is making its mark in the culinary scene in some new—and unexpected ways. From pesto to rice salads, mint adds a summery tone to dishes that’s unmatched by other herbs, according to Michael Zappone, Academic Department Director of Culinary Arts at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh.


Mint is used by chefs to add an additional level of flavor to dishes and drinks, according to Linda Marcinko, Culinary Academic Director at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of St. Louis.


“I think mint is great in summer because it brightens up so many dishes. It’s so good to use in sweet items as well as savory dishes,” she says. Marcinko enjoys utilizing mint in Thai beef and noodle salad and iced tea.


Having mint on hand is easy, too, because it’s a perennial herb that will come up each year in the garden.  According to Marcinko, “it is so easy to grow and so versatile.”


The unique flavor of mint may also be used to replace calorie-heavy ingredients in traditional dishes, according to Claire Menck, Chef Director of Culinary Arts at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Wisconsin.


Marcinko lightens up pesto by replacing the traditional basil with mint—and eliminating the cheese. Try her mint pesto, mint syrup, and rice salad to give your summer meals an extra minty kick.


Mint Pesto – Great with pasta or lamb chops

2 large bunches mint, trimmed of stems (just use the leaves)

1 bunch cilantro (can use some of the stems if they are not too thick)

6 cloves garlic, peeled

¾ cup walnuts

½ cup olive oil

¼ cup vegetable broth

Salt and pepper

Crushed red chilies, optional


Procedure:

Combine the mint leaves, cilantro, garlic and walnuts in place in the bowl of a food processor.

Pulse the mixture until it is roughly chopped.

With the machine running, slowly add the olive oil and vegetable stock. Process until smooth.

Season to taste with salt, pepper, and the Chile flakes.


Summer Rice Salad

4 cups cooked basmati rice

1 cup trimmed sugar snap peas, blanched

4 green onions, thinly sliced

1 small red bell pepper, diced

1 small jalapeño pepper, finely minced

½ cup pine nuts, lightly toasted

½ cup chopped mint leaves

½ cup olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste


Procedure:


Cut the blanched sugar snap peas in half, lengthwise.

Put the rice, peas, onions, red bell pepper, jalapeño, pine nuts, and mint leaves in a bowl. Toss together well.

Pour on the olive oil and stir to coat all ingredients. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Chill for about 2 hours before serving. Serves eight.

Mint Simple Syrup – Perfect with lemonade or mojitos

2 cups sugar

6 cups water

1 large bunch mint, roughly chopped


Procedure:

Combine the sugar and water in a medium-sized sauce pan. Stir to moisten the sugar. Add in the mint leaves.

Bringto a boil and boil for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and let the syrup sit until it is cool. Strain the syrup to remove the mint.

Store in the refrigerator until ready to use.


EDITOR’S NOTE:

The Art Institutes is a system of over 50 schools throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. Administrative office: 210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 ©2014 The Art Institutes International LLC.

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Military Advanced Education Honors Education Management Corporation Schools Military Advanced Education Honors Education Management Corporation Schools

Military Advanced Education (MAE) has selected schools throughout all four of Education Management Corporation’s (EDMC) education systems for inclusion and recognition in their 2012 Guide to America’s Top Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities. http://www.kmimediagroup.com/topmil2012

Honorees are Argosy University, Phoenix, The Art Institute of Houston, The Art Institute of Pittsburgh and The Art Institute of Pittsburgh — Online Division, The Art Institute of Seattle, Brown Mackie Colleges and South University.

This is the second consecutive year MAE selected both Brown Mackie Colleges and The Art Institutes. Colleges and universities were selected to the list based on the various benefits they provide active-duty military members, veterans and their dependants.

“We are honored to once again be recognized by Military Advanced Education for providing curriculum and support programs that are devoted to serving military members,” Lt. General John (Jack) Bergman, EDMC Military Liaison, said. “EDMC institutions are uniquely suited to serve the needs of members of our nation’s military. The broad array of programs we offer provide active duty service members, reservists, veterans, military spouses and families the quality, flexibility, and convenience they seek through courses both on campus and online.”

According to MAE, the 2012 guide is more comprehensive than ever before. Selected schools have met rigorous criteria and have truly earned the designation of “military-friendly.” Among the attributes considered in evaluating this year’s schools for inclusion in the guide are: on-campus active duty/veteran assistance, the sophistication and effectiveness of its distance learning programs, Servicemember Opportunity Colleges (SOC) participation, and the number of American Council on Education (ACE) credits the school will accept.

More than 8 percent of EDMC students are active military or veterans. Of that group, 35 percent pursue their degrees through online programs. Depending on a student’s unique circumstances, online higher education can provide the flexibility of not having to be physically located on campus. Some programs even enable active military personnel to stay enrolled online while serving overseas and others may offer the opportunity to allow special start and stop accommodations that reflect the reality of soldiers and sailors finding themselves deployed in the middle of a course.

Military Advanced Education is the only magazine produced expressly for active duty/reserve servicemembers as well as members of the National Guard and veterans who are seeking to take advantage of the Department of Defense’s education benefits.

About Education Management

Education Management Corporation ( www.edmc.edu ) is among the largest providers of private post-secondary education in North America, based on student enrollment and revenue, with a total of 107 locations in 32 U.S. states and Canada. We offer academic programs to our students through campus-based and online instruction, or through a combination of both. We are committed to offering quality academic programs and continuously strive to improve the learning experience for our students. Our educational institutions offer students the opportunity to earn undergraduate and graduate degrees and certain specialized non-degree diplomas in a broad range of disciplines, including design, media arts, health sciences, psychology and behavioral sciences, culinary, fashion, business, education, legal and information technology.

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The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts announce call for entries for Poster Design Competition The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts announce call for entries for Poster Design Competition

[PITTSBURGH, Pa. – Nov. 16, 2012] – The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, announced today that entries for the 2013 Poster Design Competition will be accepted through January 31, 2013. Winners will earn up to a full tuition scholarship to study at one of the more than 50 Art Institutes schools.

High school seniors and high school graduates challenged to design poster expressing competition’s theme: “You Can Create Tomorrow”

This year’s competition challenges high school seniors and high school graduates from the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico to design a poster that best expresses the Competition’s theme “You Can Create Tomorrow.” Contestants will compete in two different categories: (i) high school senior or (ii) high school graduate/adult.

“The kind of talent and enthusiasm exhibited by these young artists assures us that they will indeed create a unique and better tomorrow,” said John Mazzoni, President of The Art Institutes. “We are honored to highlight their creativity and talent and to assist them in reaching their academic goals.”

“It is so vital to nurture the talents of aspiring artists,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “We are proud to be a sponsor of this competition and look forward to seeing their vision expressed in their artwork.”

To see the full entry requirements and learn more about The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts Poster Design Competition, visit www.AiCompetitions.com/poster ,

The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 50 schools located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. OH Registration # 04-01-1698B; AC0165, AC0080; Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, License No. 1287, 3427, 3110, 2581. Since The Art Institutes is comprised of several institutions, see aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Americans for the Arts is the leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America. With offices in Washington, D.C. and New York City, it has a record of more than 50 years of service. Americans for the Arts is dedicated to representing and serving local communities and creating opportunities for every American to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts. Additional information is available at www.AmericansForTheArts.org.

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From Patch to Table: The Many Uses of a Pumpkin From Patch to Table: The Many Uses of a Pumpkin

While pumpkins are most often associated with holiday pies, don’t underestimate this favorite of the squash and gourd family. Not only is the mighty pumpkin delicious, but it is also quite the multi-tasker. “Pumpkins are incredibly versatile. They can be used in virtually any application,” says Chef Joseph Brown, culinary chair at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Raleigh – Durham, a campus of South University. From sweet to savory, desserts to dinners, Chef Brown and Chef Arthur Inzinga, culinary instructor at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh, offer tips and ideas for making the most of your pumpkins.

Pumpkin can be added to a variety of dishes to provide textural elements as well as flavor. “When pumpkin is cooked down it is very similar to mashed potatoes, but more sweet and flavorful,” says Chef Brown. “It brings a sweetness to the table, which is its most unique aspect.” He adds that anywhere a potato is being cut up and cooked, pumpkin would be a good addition and/or substitution.

Pureed pumpkin can be added to a variety of sauces and soups, and according to Chef Inzinga, “pumpkin is used a lot in conjunction with pasta.” He recommends using it as a filling in gnocchi. “Typically, gnocchi is made with potato puree. You can substitute pumpkin puree.” Chef Brown also notes it can be used as a filling for ravioli.

Adding the bold flavor of pumpkin to a variety of dishes can be achieved with some simple substitutions. Pumpkin chili can be created by augmenting some of the stock and tomato with pureed pumpkin. “This brings a richness to the chili. The pumpkin is going to be as much a textural component as it is a flavorful item,” says Chef Brown. He also adds that pumpkin and tomato go together beautifully. This can be seen in autumn or pumpkin pizza, where the pumpkin becomes part of the sauce. Chef Brown likes to top his pumpkin pizza with barbequed chicken. Chef Inzinga recommends juicing some of the pumpkin pulp and using it as the cooking liquid for risotto or mixing equal parts pureed pumpkin to mashed potatoes. “It can be used as an ingredient in pancakes and waffles to replace some of the liquid and add flavor,” he says.

Pumpkin can also take center stage in dishes such as pumpkin-based bread puddings and ice creams and pumpkin butter. Chef Inzinga says pumpkin butter is much like apple butter and can be created by adding pumpkin pie spices and cooking the pumpkin down until it is a spreadable consistency. He also recommends pumpkin/apple smoothies made with pureed pumpkin, apple juice and a bit of yogurt.

Enjoy the full flavor of the pumpkin by dicing and roasting with other root vegetables, sautéing it to bring out its natural flavors or even putting it on the grill. Chef Brown says the slow heat of the grill brings out natural sugars, removes moisture and condenses the flavor.

Don’t forget that the flesh isn’t the only part of the pumpkin that can be used. The seeds can be roasted and used as a garnish on breads, muffins or on pumpkin soup; added to homemade granola; or pureed into sauces and pesto. According to Chef Inzinga, the flower blossoms can be battered and fried or stuffed and baked. Both chefs even recommend using hollowed-out pumpkins as bowls and tureens for chili or soup.

“It’s important for people to realize that when you go pumpkin picking, those pumpkins are grown for their size and shape, not necessarily flavor,” says Chef Brown. The large pumpkins are less sweet. He says there are hundreds of varieties of pumpkins, and you can get more sweetness and flavor if you are more selective. He recommends http://allaboutpumpkins.com/ as a reference for the characteristics of different types of pumpkins.

Tips for Roasting a Pumpkin:
To roast a pumpkin, Chef Brown recommends roasting it at 350-375° for a medium length roasting time. The flesh will brown a bit. For a more concentrated flavor, roast at 300° for a longer period of time and bump the temperature up to 425° for the last 15-20 minutes. Pumpkins are a lot like potatoes – you can tell if they are done by touch. They will get softer the longer they cook.

The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 50 schools located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. OH Registration # 04-01-1698B; AC0165, AC0080; Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, License No. 1287, 3427, 3110, 2581. See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Alumni success stories

Get inspired by the stories of our alumni and the opportunities that exist for creative people like you. Learn about their careers and insights about their education from Art Institutes schools across the country.

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