Press Releases

Cooking with Cicadas? A Positive Spin on the 17-Year Bug

By: The Art Institutes

June 13, 2016

Chef Phil Enck’s unique experience cooking with cicadas received special attention when he was invited to speak on the topic for Pittsburgh’s NPR affiliate, WESA. Chef Enck, a culinary instructor at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh, shared tips and recipes that utilized cicadas.

Cicadas are insects that have hard, sleek shells topped with two bulb-like, red eyes. On average, they’re a little over 1.5 inches in length and they come out of the ground in 17-year cycles. 2016 marked the end of one of those cycles, and cicadas were covering trees and the ground in many areas of Ohio and western Pennsylvania.

See the article here, and learn how you can make Chef Enck’s Blackened Cicadas with Bacon over Cheese Grits recipe:

http://wesa.fm/post/cicadas-taste-great-grits-and-other-things-you-probably-didn-t-know-about-pas-perennial-pests#stream/0

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By: The Art Institutes

June 13, 2016