Art Institutes

Game Art& Design

I want to put my ideas in play.

Welcome to one of the hardest things you’ll ever do. If you’re still reading, then you must be up to the challenge. And that’s good, because you’re also in line for a career where you can feed your passion for gaming—and turn the skills you've honed into a career where you do what you love. Your future starts in our Game Art & Design degree programs, where you can learn what you need to become a key player in the game creation process. Using the same kinds of technology professionals use, you’ll explore what it takes to get games into the production pipeline. And get yourself into a dynamic industry. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. It’ll put your talent and commitment to the test. But it could also put you in a position to succeed.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty & instructors.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Game Art & Design

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Game Art & Design

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/65 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

I'm ready to take the intensity to a whole new level.

If you see yourself using your creativity to tell stories, you’re looking at a rigorous education. In Game Art & Design, you’ll start with the fundamentals like the principles of design, drawing, and color, in both traditional and digital art. You can build skills in game design, level design, 2D concept art, 3D modeling, texturing, and real-time lighting. The focus is on the principles of gaming, balance, and usability; creating the entire gaming experience; and developing games that’ll be used in industry-standard engines. You’ll explore the planning, scope, problem-solving abilities, and economics of creating a market-ready game. And through it all you’ll put in a lot of hours, work your way through a lot of trial and error, and find yourself challenged by other like-minded students. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet Our Alumni

  • Eric Schwartz

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production , 2013

    "[My education gave me] the knowledge, skills, and team working abilities that I need and use every day."

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    Eric Schwartz

    Eric Schwartz is working as a creative services producer at KDRV News Watch 12 in Medford, Oregon. He’s responsible for conceptualizing, producing, and delivering commercials. “What I enjoy most about my career is never knowing what will come next,” he says. Eric adds that his career challenges his creativity and that he learns something new each day.

    He says that reaching people on a personal level is one of the most rewarding parts of his career. “They are projects that aren't out to make a name brand or make a lot of money, but projects that help to spread positive messages that are meant to help out local communities.” These include “You Can Play” video for Portland State University Campus and a “Habitat for Humanity” video. Eric adds that he’s influenced by people who’ve supported him—especially during his time in the military. Eric served in the United States Navy for four years as a hospital corpsman.

    Eric, who in 2013 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Film & Video from The Art Institute of Portland, says that his education helped to prepare him for his creative career. “[It gave me] the knowledge, skills, and team working abilities that I need and use every day.” He recommends that current students take risks and challenges that others won’t. “If things are not how you imagined they would be, find a new way to look at them. Tackle every job with a positive attitude.”

    See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/64 program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • Karina Reed

    Fashion Design , 2014

    "The range of experience I gained in school opened my eyes to all the different facets of apparel design and the various careers that were possible with my degree."

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    Karina Reed

    Karina Reed is working as an assistant product developer and designer for Kroger/Fred Meyer in Portland. She’s responsible for communicating with factories, assisting senior designers with collections, and collaborating with buying team. “Most of my day is spent reviewing artwork, fit, and color submits with senior designers, specialists, and buyers—and communicating approvals or changes to factories,” she says. Karina also researches trends for upcoming seasons and analyzes selling for current and past seasons. She points out the best perk of her job—traveling the world for development trips.

    Karina is a past winner of Sock It To Me’s “Design-A-Sock Competition,” earning the top spot over 5,500 other entries. “It's a surreal experience walking into a store and seeing my design for sale, and knowing that people all over the country have bought them,” she says. Karina also saw her senior collection on the runway at Portland Fashion Week. “Getting to share it with my friends and classmates made it even more special because we had all gone through the same struggles to reach that goal.”

    Karina, who in 2014 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Apparel Design from The Art Institute of Portland, says that her education helped her to choose the right career path for her interests and talents. “I honestly never considered product development as a possible career path until I took Tech Sketching and Digital Surface Design [class] and realized how much I enjoy designing digitally.” She recommends that current students be aware of how they’re presenting themselves during interviews. “From your portfolio to your handshake to your shoes, you are constantly being judged in this field. It would be nice if skill was the only thing that mattered but in reality people often hire the person they most want to work with, or whose aesthetic most closely lines up with theirs. Do your research, know your stuff, and always be prepared to defend your work.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/60 program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • Portland Alumni Ty Johnson

    Ty Johnson

    Media Arts & Animation , 2005

    "I like to tell people that I play with dolls for a living. In truth I'm more like a digital sculptor."

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    Ty Johnson

    Ty Johnson is working as a 3D Modeler for LAIKA, an animation studio in Hillsboro, Oregon. He creates characters based off of drawings and clay maquettes, but has the opportunity to incorporate his own flavor into them. “It is up to me to ensure my creations are aesthetically pleasing and also meet specific technical standards established by riggers, texture artist, animators and everyone else downstream,” he says. He’s especially excited to be part of the team responsible for the Oscar-nominated film, “The Boxtrolls.” “I’d be lying if I said I didn’t love making internationally recognized Oscar-nominated films. Being a part of something as huge as ‘Paranorman,’ ‘The Boxtrolls,’ and ‘Kubo and The Two Strings’ has given me the opportunity to share my passion with literally millions of people.”

    The process that Ty uses to create a character is incredibly intricate. Each puppet he models is further broken into over 72 mechanical parts. “These mechanisms allow for the articulation of eyeballs, glowing ears, and the swapping of magnetic facial expressions.” Each character is unique and requires custom internals, so Ty utilizes 3D printing to get the intricate parts to fit and function properly. “[It] is the hardest yet most rewarding part of my job.” Like many in his industry, he is inspired by the work of Jim Henson. “I can’t help but think of Jim Henson and his amazing puppets when I’m at work. I am a 90s child and Jim’s fingerprints were on everything I grew up with. He’s definitely a hero of mine.”

    Ty, who in 2005 earned a Bachelor of Science in Media Arts & Animation from The Art Institute of Portland, says that his education taught him a valuable lesson in adaptation. As he was working toward his degree, the school updated its software from what it had been using to reflect a new industry standard. “I was distraught and worried that I was starting over. But I couldn’t have been more wrong. The truth is that technology moves fast, standards change, and if you can’t adapt you’ll be left in the dust.” Ty said that the experience he gained in learning the new technology has played out time and time again now that he’s a professional. “Now when I learn about new tools and software I look forward to it like a kid on Christmas Eve.”

    See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/73 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...

What Will I Study?

Game Art Design Study Section

I have the imagination. I need the tools.

In this competitive industry, companies are looking for creative people who are passionate about the craft of taking a game from concept to market-ready. The curriculum for Game Art & Design will help you prepare to do just that, as you study:

  • Digital Imaging
  • Life Drawing
  • Drawing & Anatomy
  • 2D Animation
  • Digital Storytelling
  • Character and Object Design
  • 3D Modeling
  • Game Art & Design
  • Texture Mapping
  • 3D Animation
  • Material & Lighting
  • Game Modeling
  • Game Production Pipeline
  • Designing Interior Spaces and Worlds

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Game Art & Design is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we temper the tough with the support you need to make your creativity marketable. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. Here, you’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. So if your heart is telling you that you belong in a creative field, you belong here. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • Annin Barrett

    Annin Barrett

    Fashion Design

    "Keep at it. Never stop learning."

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    Annin Barrett
    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    I take classes to visit design archives for professional level research, and I bring in guest speakers from my network.  

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    I often have students work in pairs or teams to pitch ideas, iterate designs, and revise prototypes. This interaction creates lots of energy and inspiration. Focused group research and discussion develops new work that surprises everyone with its innovation.

    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    Design is all about teamwork.  Understanding and valuing different perspectives gives projects more depth of meaning and reaches more audiences.

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    Keep at it.  Never stop learning.

    How can people find out more about you and your artwork?

    My website address is
    anninbarrett.com. Read More...
  • Casey Martin

    Casey Martin

    Interior Design

    "Go see the world, meet new people, see new things."

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    Casey Martin
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I always migrated to the creative side of things, but a year into an architecture program I realized I was destined to create captivating interiors. Bringing people alive in spaces is something I strive for in every project.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I teach based on real-world scenarios and experiences. I want my students to feel as if every project, every class is grounded in reality. I reach out to many industry professionals so students can hear from a range of professionals—and start building relationships in the industry before they graduate.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I teach mostly studio classes, so I spend a lot of class time working one-on-one with students. I also think that discussions and examples of real-world projects is a fantastic way to learn. I often bring in examples of projects I’m working on so they can see the work in progress.

    In what way do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    I’m always pushing students to go further, posing questions so they can find the answers themselves. I encourage them to talk to their peers and ask the hard questions—that’s the best way for them to learn.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is a huge part of the design process. We can’t solve problems alone. I teach many group-project classes as well as cross-listed classes with Industrial Design students. It’s all about blending ideas from many different disciplines and working together to create a solution.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    The world is changing, and no one does just one thing anymore. Be flexible in what you can offer, always work hard, and be prepared.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Take every vacation day you have. Go see the world, meet new people, see new things. As creatives, we need to resupply our creative minds. We need that escape and that inspiration—and travel is, in my opinion, the best way to do that.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I grew up in the Middle East, and one of the things I love most about teaching here is the diversity.

    Read More...
  • Blakesley Clapp

    Blakesley Clapp

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

    "Have a good attitude, work hard, and don't be afraid to ask questions."

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    Blakesley Clapp
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I don’t really have a defining moment. I have been involved in creative endeavors nearly my whole life. It is interesting how a creative career rarely takes a linear path.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    I always try to bring my experience in the field into the classroom in a couple of ways. The first allows me to give them real-­world experiences in terms of the technologies they are learning. How they are used and why they need to know them. The second is by sharing the mistakes I’ve made over the years. Seems like you always learn more from struggles than successes; so I do my best to share a little of my journey that way.

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    The key for me is to treat each student as an individual. Everyone has different skills and fears that can get in the way of those fears. I do my best to address the industry challenges in ways that make sense to the individual student.

    What role does collaboration contribute to students’ success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    Collaboration is the lifeblood of the film industry. It is literally a profession that could not exist without collaboration. This makes it one of the most rewarding and the most challenging parts of the industry. That is why I always start the students collaborating as soon as possible.

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    There are two things really.  One—that hard work and a good attitude will always trump over a specific skill. You can always learn a new skill—an attitude and work ethic is harder to learn on the job. The other is that you can never stop learning, especially in an industry that depends so heavily on technology. To stop learning is to remove yourself from the running in terms of career.


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  • Deny Ehrlich

    Deny Ehrlich, MS

    Graphic & Web Design

    "It's up to you to make things happen. Don't sit back and wait for someone else to do it."

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    Deny Ehrlich, MS
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    After I earned my undergraduate degree, I wasn’t sure which direction I wanted to go. I visited a graphic designer in her “native habitat” (her studio). When I saw her drawing table, I connected immediately to what she was doing—it struck an immediate chord.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’ve worked both as a graphic designer in a studio and as a self-employed freelance designer. I bring the whole of that experience to the classroom. I approach each class as though we’re working in a studio; I treat my students as junior designers. I teach them to approach a project by first knowing what the client wants, and what challenges they face, then coming up with viable creative solutions.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I teach a course that incorporates the real-life experience of working for a nonprofit client, coordinated through an actual design studio. Students must work with a professional art director as well as an actual client. They face real-world challenges like time constraints, competing priorities, personality conflicts, design requirements, and client presentations. They find that working together in pairs and groups allows them to help and inspire each other.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    In that class, students from the Graphic & Web Design, Digital Photography, and Advertising program areas come together to create a collateral campaign for the client. While each group is tasked with their own component, they also work together collaboratively. They learn that the solution depends on the sum of the parts—and that sometimes, creative compromises have to be made.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?


    You’re in the driver’s seat. It’s up to you to make things happen. Don’t sit back and wait for someone else to do it.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Embarking on a creative career can take time, so take advantage of any opportunity that seems promising. Keep your eye on where you want to go, but be realistic about how and when you can get there. And keep an open mind. Read More...
  • Elizabeth M. Lockwood

    Elizabeth M. Lockwood

    Interior Design

    "Design is messy, challenging, and very rewarding."

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    Elizabeth M. Lockwood
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was always getting in trouble for challenging the status quo. I realized I had a knack for solving complex design challenges—even after being told “no.”


    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    I try to put myself in my students’ place, asking myself what I wish I’d known about my profession before I got into it. What theory could I have used? What resource would’ve been helpful? Then I think about how I can effectively share that knowledge with students.


    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    I love sharing my passion for design with others. I love the iterative process and the endless possibilities. I challenge students to research, investigate, collaborate, and explore every facet of a design so they feel confident that what they’re proposing is well thought out. In Hospitality Design Studio, we work on the technical and collaborative skills needed to be an innovative designer. I use metaphor and storytelling to help deepen students’ knowledge—for example, we do an organizational ball toss exercise where students discover how team members perform in a group project. The metaphor of tossing the ball translates to how team members juggle multiple tasks during a project.


    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    I’m a connector. I love linking people and ideas together. When I introduce collaboration to students I begin with this quote from Keith Sawyer: “When we collaborate, creativity unfolds across people; the sparks fly faster and the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Collaboration drives creativity because innovation always emerges from a series of sparks—never a single flash of insight.” It’s critical for designers to learn how to work effectively in teams.


    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    Ask questions. Network with peers, faculty, staff, and guest presenters. You never know where a great job will come from. 
    Design is messy, challenging, and very rewarding. You have the opportunity to influence others’ lives with your design.

    Is there anything else you'd like us to know about you, your experience, or your role as a faculty member at The Art Institutes?

    I get to know my students and help them design their own story. What story do you want to tell? I’m here to listen.


    What was the inspiration for your artwork?

    The design investigates a balance between modern Pacific Northwest aesthetics and the essence of how a building can nurture a valuable quality of life for a family.

    The residence capitalizes on the natural landscape to sustain resources. Horizontal planes extend the eye revealing framed views evoking passive building strategies and creating a place of comfort and refuge.


    Please explain what we are seeing in your pieces.

    2,300 square foot new residence in Clackamas County, including a topographic site plan, first and second floor plan, and building section exploring solar orientation exposure. 

    How can people find out more about you and your artwork?

    ereed@elizabeth-interiors.com


    Read More...
  • Jordan Lukrich

    Jordan Lukrich

    Media Arts & Animation

    "Always try to push yourself to be better and learn more."

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    Jordan Lukrich
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Fourth grade. We had a small basket of paper on our desks so that we could solve math problems and such, but I always used it to draw. My teacher told me I had to stop using it for drawing, but said that I would probably do something amazing with my drawing.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    I give the students examples of real-world applications from things I have seen and learned out in the industry, from networking to finding jobs and the realities of what the job entails.

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    Every class is taught the same way, so that I make plenty of time to have one-on-one time with each student. This way, none of them are lost, or fall behind. I tell the students that they need to push themselves outside of their comfort level, because that is where you learn and grow.

    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    Collaboration helps you realize that your idea is not the be-all and end-all solution. You have to work with others, hear other ideas, and take criticism well, because this industry revolves around other people telling you to change and adjust your work.  

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    To always try to push yourself to be better and learn more. I would much rather hire someone who has a slightly lower skill level, but is constantly open to learning and growing, than someone who is amazing but is closed off and stubborn. Best advice I give students is to just be a good person, because you work with these people all day long, and they want to surround themselves with someone positive.

    Is there anything else you'd like us to know about you, your experience, or your role as a faculty member at The Art Institutes?

    I love this job for many reasons, but I love that I am constantly getting new classes. It makes me push myself to learn more and to keep up with new things that are going on.
    Read More...
  • FilmProd

    Shelly Lipkin

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

    "Do the hard work it takes to succeed."

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    Shelly Lipkin
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    The moment I got on stage in college in a production of Midsummer Night’s Dream.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share the things I’ve experienced in the film industry over the past 40 years.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In my Fundamentals in Screenwriting class, students work up a script idea based on a character we’ve created as a group. This helps them justify that character’s intentions, motivations, and needs. It's a lot of fun and very creative, and we usually come up with fascinating stories.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Never give up, even in the face of an extremely competitive environment. Be realistic about those obstacles, and do the hard work it takes to succeed.

    Read More...
  • Yer Za Vue

    Yer "Za" Vue

    Media Arts & Animation

    "There are no shortcuts. If you want something to move from point A to point B, it's up to you."

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    Yer "Za" Vue
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    It was when my third grade English as a Second Language teacher was drawing ballerinas. I was mesmerized by the beauty and grace behind her work.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    After interning at Hallmark Cards and Disney Feature Animation, I moved to Orlando to work on traditional animated films and shorts for Disney, including The Little Match Girl, Brother Bear, Lilo & Stitch, John Henry, Tarzan, Mulan, Pocahontas, and Circle of Life. Much of what I teach reflects the training I received—both as an intern and as a professional. A big part of my job at Disney was taking on new trainees and prepping them for production. I'm used to running a crew of twelve or more artists, so teaching comes naturally.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I teach traditional animation only. There are no shortcuts. If you want something to move from point A to point B, it's up to you. The quality of the animation depends on your experience and your vision. A good example: the flight-animated test my advanced students perform. Each chooses a type of bird and then redesigns it so that it's easily replicated. This exercise challenges their understanding of wind resistance, how to deal with timing based on the weight of the bird, counter-action, follow-through, and more. In animation, a perfect drawing doesn't necessarily equate to a perfect animation.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    It's very important. In a course like Pre-Production Team, students work together to create an animated short on deadline. Matching the right students from the right programs to meet the demands of the production is crucial to the film’s success.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I tell them to take themselves seriously. Skills can be learned, but not having the right mindset will hold you back years.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I emigrated to the U.S. from Laos when I was very young. I love what I do, and I couldn't imagine doing anything else. The feeling I get from sharing my good fortune every time I step in front of a class is hard to put into words. I hope that, someday, one of my students will pass this knowledge on to the next generation of artists.


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  • Salvatore Reda

    Salvatore Reda

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Curiosity will take you places you never thought you'd go."

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    Salvatore Reda
    What program and at what school do you teach?

    Ai Portland, Graphic and Web Design.

    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    While I was working toward an art degree, I was awarded a studio space for creating art. I spent most of my time in that studio creating large paintings and drawings for a gallery show. When the show was a success, I wanted to keep pushing forward in the creative art world.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    I take real-world projects and problems from advertising, interactive design, page layout, and creative typography and bring them into the classroom—along with real clients to critique student work. We also visit local design companies to look at new technologies.

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    I often assign a process work book for students to fill with sketches, ideas, and concepts throughout the term. It demonstrates the progress of a project from early stages to completion with full graphic renderings.

    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    Pulling together students’ strengths and skill sets from across all design disciplines, with each student assigned a certain task, helps flesh out the whole project as a unified whole.

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    Curiosity will take you places you never thought you’d go.  Make personal connections whatever you do and keep those connections alive.

    How can people find out more about you and your artwork?

    http://salvatorereda.com


    Read More...
Miami International University of Art & Design alumni Marlon Munoz I'm challenged by the opportunity to take my ideas and bring them to life. Marlon Munoz
Visual Effects & Motion Graphics, Miami International University of Art & Design, 2008