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The Art Institute of Raleigh—Durham - a campus of South University
Your creative future begins in Durham

We prepare students for careers in design, fashion, media arts, and culinary

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The Art Institute of Raleigh–Durham, a campus of South University

410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701   |    1.919.317.3050

Choose what you would like to study in Durham

Our degree programs in the areas of Design, Media Arts, Fashion, and Culinary help you focus your talents and explore what you’re passionate about. In our collaborative environment, our instructors will guide and mentor you as we help you build the skills you need to start your creative career.

College Bound

College Bound is an 11-week college experience for high school juniors and seniors to connect with others that share your interests while taking college level courses designed to help you grow, discover yourself, and create something awesome.

College Bound
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Your education just got more affordable

Earn a grant up to $17,028 (up to 20% of your tuition).

Pursue your creative degree in a young community known for its focus on higher education and research

The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham - a campus of South University

The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, a campus of South University, is located in Durham's historical and entertainment district. Here, you'll have the opportunity to learn in a region committed to innovation.

Join us at
Open House

Saturday, September 12, 2015
 Art Institutes Open House

See How We Live For Creativity

Explore our community. It's all here .
The only thing missing is you.

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The District at 410 Restaurant

The District at 410 Restaurant is a student-run restaurant that's open to the public. Located at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, The District at 410 Restaurant serves as the dining lab for students in the culinary program, offering a unique combination of real-world experience and instructional content.

Under the direction of Chef Leslie Eckert, culinary students nourish and delight patrons while taking the final steps on their path to becoming culinary professionals. From food ordering and preparation to guest seating and serving, The District at 410 Restaurant is a complete instructional environment for students that offers a quality dining experience to its patrons.

For reservations, please contact The District at 410 Restaurant at 919.317.3200 or e-mail thedistrict@aii.edu

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News and events

The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, a campus of South University Culinary Students Feed the Rolling Stones The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, a campus of South University Culinary Students Feed the Rolling Stones

(Raleigh-Durham, June 2015)  From June 27 – June 30, culinary students and instructors at The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, a campus of South University worked with a chef that tours with the Rolling Stones to feed the crew.  

On July 1, the day of the Rolling Stones concert at Carter-Finley Stadium in Raleigh, the students and instructors were given the opportunity to be backstage to showcase their culinary talents with a large section of the buffet for the Rolling Stones, their family, guests, reporters, etc.  The campus partnered with a local sushi eatery to do a sushi/chocolate buffet.  The sushi eatery provided the rolls and the campus provided a chocolate fountain, petit fours, and Rolling Stones themed cookies along with two other desserts.  The campus created a large chocolate sculpture in the form of the Rolling Stones’ tongue and a large sugar sculpture of a guitar with guitar picks as the base.  The airbrush work was designed by a graphic design student at The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options are subject to change. The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, a campus of South University, 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, Durham, NC  27701©2015 The Art Institutes. Our email address is csprogramadmin@edmc.edu.

See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.


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Career Change – Passion You Have to Pursue Career Change – Passion You Have to Pursue

Whether you are pursuing a life-long passion or looking to reinvent yourself, it is never too late to pursue a new career. Aimee Flynn, Career Services Director at The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, offers tips on changing careers and making the most of this transitional period.

Hunt & Gather: It's important to start with a thorough investigation into your new industry. "You are looking for general parallels between who you are and who you want to be, where you've been and where you are going," said Flynn.

Pasha Lemnah, a photography student at The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, found this parallel between the past and the future. After 20 years in the nursing field, she reevaluated her life and what she wanted from her career. This investigation led her to pursue her childhood passion of photography.

Seasoned Pro or Newbie? According to Flynn, dumping the ego is crucial. "Be open to starting fresh, and embrace a sense of equal status with everyone in the classroom," she said. "Surrender to the fact that you can learn as much from a first year student as they can from you."

Lemnah embraces this equal status, finding support through her fellow students who refer to her as "Mama Pasha."

Network. Network. Network. While this is a common tip, be smart about how and with whom you network. Try to network with people already employed in your field of interest. Surround yourself with people who are supportive and can help you acquire new contacts.

Now that you're back in the classroom, go beyond it: Attend local "Lunch and Learns", workshops and industry-related events.

Be willing to change: "Every industry has its own tenors; its own language. Adopt them," said Flynn. Evaluate your Facebook, Twitter and social networking pages to reflect who you want to be.

A willingness to change is a key factor in successfully reinventing yourself through your career. A great example is Denise Hartz, an interior design student at The Art Institute of Michigan. Hartz, who is retiring from her current career in two years, said "I want to be a successful older person. I don't want to retire to retire." Instead, she's taking steps to turn a passion she's had for years into a new career in interior design.

Revisit your resume: "Develop a new resume as a platform to highlight your critical and analytical thinking skills, your leadership abilities and willingness to collaborate, your planning and management skills, and your ability to facilitate creative thinking when faced with a problem to solve," recommends Flynn.

Build your team: Find a dedicated Career Services advisor. Flynn said, "make an appointment, show up prepared, and be humble and open to an entry level experience"

"I just think it's never too late in life to do what you want to do…pursue a dream," said Hartz. Lemnah echoes this statement, calling herself a "walking, living, breathing dream catcher."

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From Patch to Table: The Many Uses of a Pumpkin From Patch to Table: The Many Uses of a Pumpkin

While pumpkins are most often associated with holiday pies, don’t underestimate this favorite of the squash and gourd family. Not only is the mighty pumpkin delicious, but it is also quite the multi-tasker. “Pumpkins are incredibly versatile. They can be used in virtually any application,” says Chef Joseph Brown, culinary chair at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Raleigh – Durham, a campus of South University. From sweet to savory, desserts to dinners, Chef Brown and Chef Arthur Inzinga, culinary instructor at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh, offer tips and ideas for making the most of your pumpkins.

Pumpkin can be added to a variety of dishes to provide textural elements as well as flavor. “When pumpkin is cooked down it is very similar to mashed potatoes, but more sweet and flavorful,” says Chef Brown. “It brings a sweetness to the table, which is its most unique aspect.” He adds that anywhere a potato is being cut up and cooked, pumpkin would be a good addition and/or substitution.

Pureed pumpkin can be added to a variety of sauces and soups, and according to Chef Inzinga, “pumpkin is used a lot in conjunction with pasta.” He recommends using it as a filling in gnocchi. “Typically, gnocchi is made with potato puree. You can substitute pumpkin puree.” Chef Brown also notes it can be used as a filling for ravioli.

Adding the bold flavor of pumpkin to a variety of dishes can be achieved with some simple substitutions. Pumpkin chili can be created by augmenting some of the stock and tomato with pureed pumpkin. “This brings a richness to the chili. The pumpkin is going to be as much a textural component as it is a flavorful item,” says Chef Brown. He also adds that pumpkin and tomato go together beautifully. This can be seen in autumn or pumpkin pizza, where the pumpkin becomes part of the sauce. Chef Brown likes to top his pumpkin pizza with barbequed chicken. Chef Inzinga recommends juicing some of the pumpkin pulp and using it as the cooking liquid for risotto or mixing equal parts pureed pumpkin to mashed potatoes. “It can be used as an ingredient in pancakes and waffles to replace some of the liquid and add flavor,” he says.

Pumpkin can also take center stage in dishes such as pumpkin-based bread puddings and ice creams and pumpkin butter. Chef Inzinga says pumpkin butter is much like apple butter and can be created by adding pumpkin pie spices and cooking the pumpkin down until it is a spreadable consistency. He also recommends pumpkin/apple smoothies made with pureed pumpkin, apple juice and a bit of yogurt.

Enjoy the full flavor of the pumpkin by dicing and roasting with other root vegetables, sautéing it to bring out its natural flavors or even putting it on the grill. Chef Brown says the slow heat of the grill brings out natural sugars, removes moisture and condenses the flavor.

Don’t forget that the flesh isn’t the only part of the pumpkin that can be used. The seeds can be roasted and used as a garnish on breads, muffins or on pumpkin soup; added to homemade granola; or pureed into sauces and pesto. According to Chef Inzinga, the flower blossoms can be battered and fried or stuffed and baked. Both chefs even recommend using hollowed-out pumpkins as bowls and tureens for chili or soup.

“It’s important for people to realize that when you go pumpkin picking, those pumpkins are grown for their size and shape, not necessarily flavor,” says Chef Brown. The large pumpkins are less sweet. He says there are hundreds of varieties of pumpkins, and you can get more sweetness and flavor if you are more selective. He recommends http://allaboutpumpkins.com/ as a reference for the characteristics of different types of pumpkins.

Tips for Roasting a Pumpkin:
To roast a pumpkin, Chef Brown recommends roasting it at 350-375° for a medium length roasting time. The flesh will brown a bit. For a more concentrated flavor, roast at 300° for a longer period of time and bump the temperature up to 425° for the last 15-20 minutes. Pumpkins are a lot like potatoes – you can tell if they are done by touch. They will get softer the longer they cook.

The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 50 schools located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. OH Registration # 04-01-1698B; AC0165, AC0080; Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, License No. 1287, 3427, 3110, 2581. See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Six Ways To Use Social Media In Your Job Search Six Ways To Use Social Media In Your Job Search

Resume? Check. Cover letter? Check. Now you’re ready to begin that job search, right? Wrong. There may be some very important things you’re forgetting about that could dramatically enhance your job search.

Nowadays, job searches involve much more than simply submitting hundreds of resumes and cover letters. “Today’s job search requires a strategy that uses social media as well as traditional vehicles,” says Wendy Wagner, career services director for The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale.

According to a 2012 Jobvite survey, 92 percent of U.S. companies use social networks to find talent, with LinkedIn the most popular. “Make sure you have a social media strategy to augment traditional methods such as face-to-face networking and informational interviews,” says Lyndsay Cooper, career services director for The Art Institute of Tennessee-Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta.

Wagner and Cooper offer the following tips to give yourself an edge in your job search.

Brand consistency. Make sure your profile is professional and reflects the job you’re looking for across all social media platforms. Ensure your privacy settings are secure (especially on Facebook). On LinkedIn, make sure your profile is complete including skills and recommendations. On Twitter, link to your website, blog or online resume. And don’t forget Pinterest, YouTube, Google+ and Foursquare.

Know your audience. Your audience in Facebook is different from your audience in Twitter or LinkedIn. Make sure your updates reflect that. On LinkedIn, share articles and blogs on industry-related topics. On Facebook, post more personal (but not too detailed) updates to remind your friends that you’re in the job market.

Be proactive. Use social media to connect with recruiters, employers and employees of companies you’d like to work for. Join – and participate in — organizations, groups and blogs in your industry or alumni groups. Become an industry expert or thought leader.

Research. Use social media to create your target list of companies, then research those companies and their employees. Use hashtags on Twitter to find jobs. For example, if you are interested in fashion, search #fashionjobs. Sites like Technorati or Twellow let you search people’s bios and the URLs in their bios; you can easily find, follow and engage key employees of those companies so they get to know you before you approach them for a job. Prepare for a job interview by using social media to research the interviewer and find common topics to break the ice.

Network online. Expand your network and engage others with similar interests by posting, sharing/forwarding, tweeting and retweeting relevant articles and blogs. This raises your online profile, and encourages others to do the same for you. Twitter works well for this.

Know your online profile. Google yourself and make sure what you see is what you want it to be. Go toKlout.com so you can see your “klout” score, which reports how influential and engaged you are across platforms. Another great site is wefollow.com, a Twitter directory organized by shared interests or categories. Users can add themselves to the categories that best fit their interests.

Today, employers use LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and other social media to identify, recruit and check out new employees. The Internet has helped level the job search playing field by offering access to resources that enable you to identify and prepare for career opportunities. But it’s also offered employers access to more talented job candidates. A smart social media strategy can help you stand out and land the job you seek.

For more information about The Art Institutes, visit www.artinstitutes.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE:
The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 50 schools located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. OH Registration # 04-01-1698B; AC0165, AC0080; Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, License No. 1287, 3427, 3110, 2581. Since The Art Institutes is comprised of several institutions, see aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important information.

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Notable alumni

Learn more from some of our grads who’ve made a name for themselves as they talk about their education, their careers, what Creativity for Life means to them, and their advice for aspiring creative professionals.

Explore all of our Alumni
Katrina Williams

Katrina Williams

Graphic Designer & Art Assistant , Chapel Hill Magazine

Read Katrina's story
Regina Rangel

Regina Rangel

Sous Chef , Print Works Bistro

Read Regina's story
Matthew Stewart

Matthew Stewart

Junior Designer , NOA Living

Read Matthew’s story
Joseph Gailes

Joseph Gailes

Chef,Panciuto/Mez/Whisk

Read Matthew's story
Lanna Ali-Hassan

Lanna Ali-Hassan

Design Assistant, RSI Kitchen & Bath

Read Lanna's story

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