Interior & Product Design

InteriorDesign

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Build a better future.

You can learn to make things that are smarter, simpler, and better—from the tools people use to the places where they live and work.

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Interior Design Program Image

Interior Design

Tricia Wright

Interior Design , 2015

The Art Institute of California—Sacramento, a campus of Argosy University

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You can develop the technical and creative skills to design attractive interior spaces that meet strict requirements for safety, accessibility, and sustainability.

Meet Our Faculty

  • Brian Kuebler

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Luck favors the prepared mind."

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    Brian Kuebler

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As an undergraduate, taking introductory fine art courses, I had great instructors who were encouraging and generous with their time and knowledge. That was pivotal for me, both creatively at the time and now as a professional, and it’s something I’ve always tried to pass along to my students.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Living and working in New York gave me a well-rounded experience. I've worked directly with clients and as part of a design team, held several managerial positions in the arts, and worked in production and set design for film and photography. I use examples from each of those experiences to stress the need to be self-motivated and plan ahead...so you’re not just solving immediate challenges, but considering how individual pieces fit into the fabric of the larger piece.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I like challenging students to create a product over an extended period of time, and really take ownership of it. In perspective drawing, for example, students are given what I call a "shell." I take them through the steps to set up a project in one, two, or three-point perspective, and challenge them to find their own design solutions—and really own their work.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Although most of the projects I assign are individual-based, I like to involve students in thoughtful and constructive ways to critique their peers’ work. To me, that’s just as vital as the feedback they get from me.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Work well on your own, but also be a good collaborator...you’ll have to do both to succeed in almost any profession.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    The most successful students have a good blend of determination, preparedness, and tenacity. I like the saying, "Luck favors the prepared mind."

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Getting to teach students from almost every program is a wonderful experience. And it’s rewarding to re-connect with former students and see how they’ve grown professionally and personally.

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  • Lillian "Maura" Stewart

    Fashion Marketing

    "Treat every project as a portfolio piece."

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    Lillian "Maura" Stewart

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I think I knew from a very early age that I’d like to create for a living. Living near the beach as a child, I connected with the ocean and nature and the unknown, my greatest source of inspiration. I spent a lot of time playing in my own imagined worlds, and developed a love of all things fantastical and supernatural.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I use my experience and real-world knowledge to help guide students toward their goals. I stress the importance of critical thinking, and encourage them to think about what kind of careers they want. Also, I think it’s really important to expose each new generation of fashion students to the latest technologies.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I prefer studio teaching in a creative environment. I do a class demonstration first, then have the students work on mastering the techniques individually. I give each student one-on-one feedback and help as needed, but I think letting them make mistakes helps them learn to be better artists.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    It’s important that students work together with others in school—just as they will in the workplace. Students with different sets of skills can help each other and push each other to be exceptional creative professionals.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Treat every project as a portfolio piece, and put forth your best creative effort. Never forget how important an excellent portfolio is for your career.

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  • Marci Oliver

    Culinary Arts

    "If you want to work in the restaurant industry, have a sense of urgency."

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    Marci Oliver

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I‘ve been cooking and baking since elementary school. I was always in the kitchen. In culinary school I fell in love with the kitchen environment—the heat, the hustle, the immediate customer impact. It was when I entered the pastry kitchen that I knew I’d found my home.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    During both lecture and demonstrations, I use my real-world experience to stress how the things we make in class translate to the industry. Sharing war stories from the trenches helps students understand why they’re practicing a particular skill.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I believe everyone has an ingrained creativity. So in Introduction to Baking and Pastries class, I let students come up with their own plating ideas for their desserts. While they must follow certain guidelines (for example, how many garnishes must be on the plate) they have free range to make the plates they envision come to life.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    In a restaurant, everyone has to pull together. Working in teams is the most valuable skill our graduates need—and it’s is my job to instill that collaborative spirit in my students. In our culinary program, students work together every day.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    If you want to work in the restaurant industry, have a sense of urgency.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I believe passionately in the power of education. When we educate and inspire future culinarians, we give them the tools to enhance their lives and further enrich the culinary field.

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  • Sarah E. Gibbons

    Photography

    "Photography helped me make sense of the world."

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    Sarah E. Gibbons

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve always liked drawing and painting, so I took as many art classes as I could. I discovered photography in 10th grade—about the same time I found out I had a learning disability. I decided it wouldn’t hold me back. They wanted to put me in support classes, but I asked for more photography classes instead. Photography helped me make sense of the world.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I like to take real-world situations I’ve found myself in and connect them to the project we’re working on, then ask students to craft their own solutions to some of the problems that I’ve faced.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    For me, photography and using Photoshop® are all about creative problem-solving. A project in my Advanced Photographic Post-Production class asks students to create a visual representation—a digital montage—of a smell. They must evoke a feeling without showing the object that emits the smell. For example, apple pie might smell like comfort or home. Representing that without using a photo of an apple pie requires critical thinking and ingenuity.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    We all collaborate in the working world, so teaming up on projects is important practice for communications and skill sharing. I love watching my Photography students work with Digital Film students. They bounce ideas off each other, overcome challenges, and create a stronger project. And they end up with a wider and more marketable skill set when they graduate.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Creative problem solving skills. They’re sought after and valued in any field, anywhere.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    In the words of one of my graduate school professors, “Don’t be a jerk!” We can get caught up in ego and the pursuit of our passion, but don’t let this get in the way of being humble, kind and helpful to your fellow students. In the real world, they may end being your peers and collaborators—or competitors—and you never know when you may need their help. I tell my students that I’ve gotten jobs, including my current job, with the help of classmates.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I like to tell my students that I’m an avid tennis player and birder. As nerdy as it sounds, it’s a way to urge them to be well-rounded and cultivate other passions, especially those that bring them into contact with non-creative types.

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