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Sacramento Students Create Masks in Genre Fiction Class

By: Woodrow Wagner | Program Coordinator, The Art Institute of California—Sacramento

August 15, 2017

President John F. Kennedy once said, “When power leads men toward arrogance, poetry reminds him of his limitations. When power narrows the areas of man’s concern, poetry reminds him of the richness and diversity of his existence. When power corrupts, poetry cleanses. For art establishes the basic human truths, which must serve as the touchtone of our judgment.” Indeed, these words capture the very essence of our mission here at The Art Institute of California—Sacramento. As General Education instructors, we try to provide our students and campus community with more than just four-hour PowerPoint lectures on basic human truths. Rather, we regularly feature opportunities for our students to express their artistry through the lens of the course content.

For example, Ms. Lori Fox recently brought this expression to fruition with the students in her Genre Fiction class. Based on the literature of world mythology, students constructed masks to honor and respect the sacred stories of many cultures around the world. In doing so, students participated in a tradition that dates back 20,000 years to the antlered mask wearing shamanic figure depicted in a cave in Les Trois- Feres in southwestern France. Through this activity, students were able to cross cultural boundaries in a celebration of what it meant to be human. In essence, the poetry of this kind of artistry can enlighten our students and inspire them to discover "the basic human truths that will serve as the touchtone of their judgment." 

Mask1  Mask2

Mask3  Mask5


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By: Woodrow Wagner | Program Coordinator, The Art Institute of California—Sacramento

August 15, 2017