Art Institutes

 Marketing

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Build your own brand.

It’s all about using words, images, strategies, and insights to create memorable ad campaigns, build strong brands, draw traffic to events, and express yourself.

Program Areas

Marketing & Entertainment Management

NEW Marketing & Entertainment Management

You can learn to create, manage, and market entertainment venues and events for cultural venues, corporations, creative organizations, and multimedia providers.

Meet Our Faculty

  • General Education Program Coordinator Woodrow Wilson Wagner III

    Woodrow Wilson Wagner III

    General Education

    "I want to elevate the intellectual spirit of my students to help them exercise their freedom as active participants in the society around them."

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    Woodrow Wilson Wagner III

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Teaching my first college class, in the fall of 1999.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    When I worked on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., I used political communication methods to respond to constituents and brief members of Congress and media outlets on legislation. In the classroom, I use some of those same methods to help students connect the theories of communication to the actual practice. Students have often commented how analyzing the words of politicians, entertainers, and religious leaders applies to their real-world endeavors.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My media and political communication lessons are designed to help students appraise the impact of advertisers, lobbyists, politicians, interest groups, and constituents. I want them to learn how to use communication to exercise their freedom, understand the needs of diverse groups, and create unique and innovative solutions to make their community a better place.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I’m reminded of the words of President Woodrow Wilson, who said, “We are not men because we have skill of hand, but we are men because we have an elevation of spirit. It is in the spirit that we live and not merely in the task of the day.” My greatest goal as an educator has been to elevate the spirit of my students by helping them become proficient communicators in the real world. I want to elevate the intellectual spirit of my students to help them exercise their freedom as active participants in the society around them.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    As the workplace becomes more culturally, behaviorally, educationally, and philosophically diverse, more versatile communication is essential to students’ success. I teach them to appreciate their own communication styles and the styles of others, and to use this knowledge to develop far more effective and productive working relationships.

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  • Image #1: Culinary Instructor Carol Thomas

    Carol Thomas

    Culinary Arts

    "Dreams can come true, but it takes hard work."

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    Carol Thomas

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I started college classes, I knew food and nutrition were my passion. Teaching others about nutrition and its impact on their life and health has become a lifetime goal.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I bring in executive chefs, sous chefs, and former students to help provide a look into the real culinary world. Students learn a great deal by hearing stories of what actually happens in a restaurant, on a cruise ship, in a bakery, casino, ballpark, country club, or food truck. I try to enlighten them, get them excited, but also show the realities. Dreams can come true, but it takes hard work.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I ask students to research a famous chef they may never have beard of. They come back to class and share what they’ve learned. It’s a great way to enlighten students about the industry—and how some of chefs became famous because of a new concept they created. It lets students see that the possibilities are unlimited.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I always point out that culinary students can use some help in creating the visual that sells what they cook. Students often work together in culinary classes with graphic design students and photography students. Creating a menu requires knowledge of typeface and graphics. The right photo can enhance the presentation of the food. It all works together.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I tell them that their education will give them the knowledge and skills to prepare food, but that the business world is competitive—and their success will be determined by the attitude they take to the job. They need to show up early and be willing to stay late. And they need to listen.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be open to what the masters have to offer. Combine that real world experience with classroom knowledge to create a successful career.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’m passionate about helping every student achieve their dreams. I’ve seen so many graduates go out into the world and soar in their profession. Those students make me believe in what I do.

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  • Holly Agundes

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Keep an open mind."

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    Holly Agundes

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    After taking a computer science class, I realized I could never work in a traditional business environment. I had to do something with art.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My Graphic Symbolism class is learner-centered and eclectic, yet focused. It’s designed to allow students to explore their own individual style while they create a marketable piece.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration helps create awareness of other industries...each discipline relates to the other, and these connections can carry on beyond the classroom.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I impart confidence, awareness, and hopefully the ability to laugh and learn from one's mistakes.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Keep an open mind.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I welcome any student, and any prospective student, to come sit in on my classes.

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  • Culinary Instructor James McGrath

    James McGrath

    Culinary Arts

    "If you want to get better at something, do it over and over."

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    James McGrath

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I graduated college and looked at my career options, they all involved sitting at a desk, working in an office. That wasn’t what I wanted to do with my life. So I dove headlong into cooking, something I’d done part-time in school.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    The classroom will never be the same as a professional environment. But our responsibility as instructors is to help students develop good work habits. We simulate the kinds of problems and issues that happen in the industry, so that when students experience them in the real world, they’ll know how to handle them.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I encourage students to ask questions now, while they’re still in school. I want them to leave with confidence in what they’ve learned so they can succeed in their careers.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    When students work in teams, each one looks at the project from a different angle. They each offer a different perspective. And when they bring all those perspectives together, the end result is better work.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Practice. If you want to get better at something, do it over and over.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Don't be too hard on yourself. Judge your work based on how it’s improved since the last time you critiqued it.

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  • Culinary Academic Director Katherina Griley

    Katherina Griley

    Culinary Arts

    Be confident!

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    Katherina Griley

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I realized that, in my role, I had the opportunity to make a difference in someone's life every day.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Relaying stories of my past experience in the industry makes the concepts and theories more relatable and concrete, and I think it helps students to know someone who’s actually lived the lessons they’re teaching.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My favorite class assignment, and the one that gives me the greatest sense of accomplishment, is recipe costing. Most Culinary students are terrified by math. Teaching recipe costing in an interactive, hands-on way keeps them engaged. Realizing that culinary math is really just addition, subtraction, multiplication and division eases the anxiety. Solving the challenge becomes a fun process—both for me and my students.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    It helps students realize that they won't be alone, that they won’t be expected to excel at everything. Networking with others to share ideas, and tapping into other students’ talents, is crucial to their career success, no matter what program they’re enrolled in.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be confident!

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  • General Education Instructor Laura Hohlwein

    Laura Hohlwein

    General Education

    "The best work flows from your own genuine interest and passion."

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    Laura Hohlwein

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve always been someone who loves making art, loves writing, loves teaching. My father was an art professor and my mother was an English professor, so higher education has always been a fundamental part of my world. I don't know when I stopped worrying about whether I was going to be an artist or a poet or educator, but I no longer see the need to choose. All my interests are part of something bigger—engaging with life and with others in the most meaningful way possible.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My decades of experience as a creative writer and professional artist inform my class discussions every day. Even though most students aren’t aiming to be fine artists or poets, I profoundly believe that the creative processes involved in those explorations create skills that are meaningful and transferable to most creative professions. In the case of writing, that means creating a sensitivity to story, substance, and meaning. In the case of fine art, it’s learning to play, invent, and control the elements and principles of design. I hope students can see how much fun I’m having teaching them, and consider doing it themselves someday.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    A texture project I assign in Design Fundamentals exemplifies a basic idea I have about creativity: that creative people should learn to do two very different things very well— play and edit. In this project, students roll out butcher paper over tables. Using black and white mediums of every kind, they cover the entire surface, draw over or add to each other’s work, and crunch, tear, or glue the paper. They generate all kinds of visual and physical textures and reconnect with the simple pleasure of playing. Then they cut up areas of the texture to create a typographical piece, editing the raw material to produce a clear effect.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Life is collaboration. Collaboration is messy, and it can create interesting dynamics. People tend to be either leaders or followers; trying out different roles can expand a student’s range. It’s a great lesson to learn, since in life you’re sometimes asked to work outside your comfort zone. I think in general that it’s critical that we engage, as often as possible, with people with other interests, beliefs, and approaches.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    The best work flows from your own genuine interest and passion. The first step in any creative endeavor, whether for yourself, a client, or your company, is connecting with the purpose of making the product on a personal level.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’m enormously lucky to teach such an amazing variety of courses, to work with talented students and our impressive and genuinely supportive faculty.

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  • General Education Instructor Mark Emerson

    Mark Emerson

    General Education

    "Be prepared. Be professional. Be ready to work."

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    Mark Emerson

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I’m very fortunate to be able to produce artwork outside of the classroom that I can share with students. I think it’s helpful for them to see the process that I use.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I assign a series of projects that build upon each other to encourage students to grow their abilities. By mid-term, in my drawing class in particular, they're able to translate what they're learning into producing their own work.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    As an example, the window assignments with visual merchandising force students to push themselves creatively in ways that they haven’t before. After completing the assignment, they’re extremely proud to have work they can add to their portfolio

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be prepared. Be professional. Be ready to work. Be on time. Be better than your competition.

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  • Marosi White

    Marosi White

    Interior Design

    “My philosophy on teaching is based on my belief that an active and hands-on environment strongly influences student learning outcomes.”

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    Marosi White

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    In 1996, I had the privilege of coming to the United States to go to college, and it was then when I knew that I would be able to pursue a career as a creative professional. My specific interest has always been Interior Design, and I was excited to know that many of the colleges and universities here in the United States offered degrees in Interior Design.

    I am a native of Malawi, and the education programs there do not offer many options for one to study the creative arts. Ever since I was young, I would often visualize multiple ways in which an interior space could be arranged and/or rearranged, and would in turn execute the vision with ease. I knew I was destined to become an Interior Designer.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My philosophy on teaching is based on my belief that an active and hands-on environment strongly influences student learning outcomes. I also believe that the content of my courses must reflect current practice. I go above and beyond my duties and responsibilities as an instructor to put the necessary resources in the hands of students so they can engage with professional practitioners at any stage during the course of their education. This includes guest speakers, field trips, and professional networking opportunities with the local Chapters of The National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), The International Interior Design Association (IIDA), and The American Society of Interior Designers (ASID). I also share with students my experiences in working with clients in the field.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I adopt various learning styles to help my students successfully meet the student learning outcomes required in a course. Through visual presentations, audio, video media, guest speakers, and professional networking opportunities, I am able to effectively help students connect textbook content to practical experience. These resources help equip students with tools and information that aid them in solving problems or proposing feasible, practical, and cost effective solutions for a project.

    This approach helps inspire students to perform at their highest level of communication in conveying their design ideas.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is key in the field of Interior Design. Relating life, industry and professional experience to the learning environment gives students the opportunity to experience a ‘hands-on’ practical application of information from their textbook. 

    Students are employed to work in teams within the Interior Design program, and with other students in other programs, so that they get experience working with others.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Building and maintaining good connections and relationships is very important in the field. As much of the work requires collaboration with individuals from various trade groups, it is important to be respectful and to establish good working relationships with those that can help you realize the design dreams of your client.

    Anything else?

    Being a faculty member of this institution, role model, and mentor to the students is very rewarding.

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  • Media Arts Instructor Mikiya Okada

    Mikiya Okada

    Media Arts & Animation

    "You have to learn to produce a high-quality product in a limited amount of time."

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    Mikiya Okada

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve enjoyed creating things ever since my grandma taught me how to draw a cartoon figure.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I learned so many things in school that I later realized were true in the industry. I share much of that with my students.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I always give assignments that, in addition to being the most effective way to build knowledge, I actually enjoy doing myself.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    One of the things students learn through collaboration is that there are so many career possibilities. They realize that things they learn in their own area of study could actually help them succeed in another profession.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Everybody can be great at everything if they spend enough time at it. But time is a luxury that no industry really has. You have to learn to produce a high-quality product in a limited amount time.

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  • Stephanie Lamour

    Stephanie Lamour

    Culinary Arts

    "Be positive, be strong, and never stop learning."

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    Stephanie Lamour

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Even when I was a kid, watching my father cooking in the kitchen, I knew I wanted to cook.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    In the 15 years I’d been in the industry before I started teaching, I’d been hiring students coming out of other schools and noticed a lack of knowledge and speed in some of them. When I started teaching, I decided to make sure I’d show my students how it works in the real world. I talk about the challenges they’ll encounter and how to deal with them. For example, I let them know that here, they have all the space and equipment they need. But in the real world, they probably never will.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    For my mid-term and final practicals, students make their own food and show me what they learned.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    All our classes are team-taught. I teach students the importance of working together and communicating with each other, because that’s how it is in the industry.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be positive, be strong, and never stop learning.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’m very passionate about what I do every single day. I have high standards, and try to be a role model for my students.

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