Art Institutes

Culinary

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Bring your talent to the table.

If you want to enrich the world with your talent for creating amazing cuisine—or ambience—start by experiencing everything from kitchen skills to international flavors.

Kickstart Your Culinary Education

Register before May 11 to:

  • Learn cooking theory.
  • Hone your knife skills.
  • Practice basic techniques.

And you can complete two 11 week courses in only six weeks.

Call 1-(866)-481-5562 today.

Program Areas

San Antonio Baking & Pastry School

Baking & Pastry

Rachel Shelton

Digital Photography , 2013

The Art Institute of Colorado

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Use your talent and passion to turn desserts into works of art. You’ll explore everything from plating to preparing confections to managing a commercial kitchen.

San Antonio Culinary Arts School

Culinary Arts

Rachel Shelton

Digital Photography , 2013

The Art Institute of Colorado

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Starting with fundamentals like kitchen tools and culinary techniques, you’ll explore more than 20 of the most popular international flavors and techniques.

San Antonio Culinary Management

Culinary Management

Prepare to run both the kitchen and the front of the house, using your passion for food and your head for business to create a memorable dining experience.

San Antonio Hospitality Management Degree

Hospitality Food & Beverage Management

You can learn your way around both the front and back of the house while you prepare for the challenge of bringing something new to the table for demanding consumers.

Ai students welcomed at The James Beard House

Six culinary students from The Art Institutes system of schools assisted in the preparation of Thanksgiving Day dinner at New York City’s prestigious James Beard House. Learn more about how they earned this opportunity and what they hope to have learned from their five days of immersion in the Big Apple’s culinary scene.

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Meet our Faculty

  • Christina M. Perrington, CEC

    Christina M. Perrington, CEC

    Culinary Arts

    Do what you love... life's too short not to enjoy it.

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    Christina M. Perrington, CEC

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    While I was serving during Operation Desert Storm/Desert Shield, I learned that one person could make a difference. I was a food service sergeant preparing meals for the soldiers in my unit. I used my years of experience and my creativity to make sure everything they ate was the best it could be. Good food boosts morale...and it’s my first love.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I use my life and professional experiences—good and bad—to add context to classroom lessons and help students better understand the material. My stepmother is from Vietnam, and I’ve traveled to many countries in Asia, which is why I specialize in Asian Cuisine.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I ask students to build a business plan...I love teaching the purchasing and cost-control aspect of it. I try to relate all the material to students’ everyday lives. Most of my students don’t like math, so I give them as many resources as possible to help them feel more confident with the project.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    They have a wonderful opportunity to work with students from other programs in their business plans, portfolios and menu design—not to mention the chance to make friends for life.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    My life philosophy is that the more I know, the more I know I don’t know. Life is really just an education outside the classroom. I love teaching students about food, which is my passion

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Do what you love...life’s too short not to enjoy it.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’ve been in the culinary industry for over 35 years, and I’ve seen many changes in the industry. But one thing has stayed the same: success takes hard work and perseverance. Food may be a necessity of life, but it’s also my passion. And it’s an honor to be able to teach what I love.

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  • Gary Rice

    Gary Rice, MBA

    Culinary Arts

    "Be true to yourself and work hard."

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    Gary Rice, MBA

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was 20 years old and recovering from a life-threatening illness, I began to see my life differently. I spent the better part of two years in physical, occupational, and speech therapy. After recovery I decided to take on a new challenge...to take my love of cooking and make a career out of it.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    With over two decades in the hospitality industry, I have plenty of real-world experience to share in the classroom. It all works into discussions on motivation, self-discipline, and pride. I use my contacts in the San Antonio area to bring in guest lecturers, take students on trips to hotels and restaurants, and bring them to seminars and restaurant association events where they can begin doing some networking.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I love to teach Capstone. It’s an all-encompassing class that lets me see just how much student have learned in my program. Watching them during their cooking practical shows me where the school is in terms of attention to teaching the core basics.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?


    Listen, ask questions, and stay current with trends and technology. Be true to yourself and work hard. Work in as many different places as you can when you’re young... explore the industry, then settle down and make a career of what you love best.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    As a program chair, I treat every student and every one of my team members as if they were family.

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  • Gregory Williams

    Gregory Williams, MBA, CEC

    Culinary Arts

    Never stop learning, and don't be afraid to fail.

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    Gregory Williams, MBA, CEC

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was around five years old, my brother and I opened a “restaurant” at our house for our friends. We set the kitchen floor on fire with a flaming grilled cheese sandwich. I’ve been cooking ever since.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I‘ve enjoyed plenty of success in this industry, but it’s my failures that I like to bring up in class. Students need to know that, as professionals, they’ll fail at something. The key is to not let it get you down...and to learn from every mistake, and every failure.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    It’s not a single assignment, but a class called À La Carte. I take a hands-off, advisory role and let the students take control of our student restaurant. The students help devise the menu, lay out the kitchen, and experience running an actual restaurant. When they’re empowered, when they’re praised for a job well done, students take the extra steps—and, in many cases, perform beyond their own perceived limits.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Many culinarians think that being a great cook is all it takes to succeed. Not true. All great restaurants work with other talented creative professionals to bring their vision to life. It takes photographers, graphic designers, web designers, interior designers, and more to create a restaurant. We’re all good at what we do, but few are good at everything. Collaboration lets each person play to their strengths to create something great.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Never stop learning, and don’t be afraid to fail. That’s the advice I’d give my younger self if I had the chance. The first part is simple—you can never learn too much. In our industry you can bet that your competition is up late doing research, practicing, or checking out new trends. Don’t lose out because you weren’t educated.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I always say that getting into teaching was my happy accident. I never thought I’d be in this role, and I’m glad I was given the chance. Being a part of people’s education, growth, and lifelong success is a great honor.

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