Art Institutes

Hospitality Food &Beverage Management

I want to take the lead.

When you try a new restaurant, it’s not just about quenching your appetite. It’s an experience. You soak it all in, from the appetizer to the ambience. And you come away with your own thoughts on how to make it better. There's a place in the food and beverage industry for someone with your passion—and an intense desire to succeed. Today’s employers are looking for people who can bring something new and unexpected to the table. If you’re up for the challenge, our Hospitality Food & Beverage Management degree programs are the place to start. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty* whose only goal is to help you start a career where you do what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science in Food & Beverage Management

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes
X

Bachelor of Science in Food & Beverage Management

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3448 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes
X

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3173 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience


If it was easy, anybody could do it.

Consumers know what they want when they go out. And today, they want a culinary experience that includes flavors from around the world, a unique atmosphere, and signature features that differentiate one establishment from another. That’s a lot of pressure. And that’s why our program provides a well-rounded education where you’ll study everything from menu planning to marketing. It starts with the basics, from ingredients to knife and kitchen skills. Then we’ll teach you fundamental cooking techniques like sautéing, roasting, poaching, braising, and frying. We’ll help you build management skills in areas like customer service and training alcohol servers, we well as human resource management, productivity, and cost control. You’ll study recipes, techniques, and wines from around the world. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet our Alumni

  • The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston alumni Andrew Satterwhite

    Andrew Satterwhite

    Culinary Arts , 2013

    "The Art Institute of San Antonio [taught me] why recipes come out a certain way."

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    Andrew Satterwhite

    Line Cook at Luke San Antonio

    Andrew Satterwhite is working as a line cook at Luke San Antonio in Texas. He’s responsible for set up, prep, and running the grill station for dinner service. Andrew served in the United States Army for four years as a parachute rigger and has also worked in construction. “All [of these experiences] have taught me skills that I can use for myself, but also I have used them to help this country grow,” he says.

    Andrew looks to his surroundings for inspiration and says that the best part of his culinary career is that it’s always changing. “This is one of the most diverse and exciting careers to have. I can go anywhere and learn recipes, techniques, and cultures to help me make new and exciting dishes [to] introduce to my family and others.”

    Andrew, who in 2013 earned an Associate of Applied Science in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of San Antonio, says that his education taught him why recipes turn out a certain way. “Growing up in California, I was lucky enough to encounter many cultures and the cuisines that accompanied them. In the Army, I used an electric skillet and a barbeque to make all my meals.” He recommends that current students open their minds to learning. “Figure out how to make [learning] a driving force in everything you do.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/2550 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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  • The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston alumni Angela Lawson

    Angela Lawson

    Digital Photography , 2015

    "My education at The Art Institute of San Antonio gave me the skills, knowledge, and business sense to be successful in [any] genre of photography that I choose."

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    Angela Lawson

    Real Estate Photographer for Curb Views, LLC

    Angela Lawson is a real estate photographer for Curb Views, LLC, in San Antonio, Texas. She photographs houses and collaborates with realtors to build virtual tours of real estate listings. To create her work, Angela visits homes for sale, photographing the inside and outside. “Sometimes, the home may not be photographically ready and I help the owners and realtors to straighten up,” she says. “I had a realtor specifically request me as her photographer because she liked my photographic style. The previous home I shot for her sold in the first 8 hours of being listed. She was so happy and that made me happy!”

    Angela’s creative inspirations include Annie Leibovitz, Martin Schoeller, Herb Ritts, Jerry Uelsman, Christian Coigny, and Helmut Newton. She’s excited to be learning new skills and meeting new people. “I have the chance with each passing day to make better work than the day before. This work is seen by many, many different people and is a reflection of my hard work and knowledge of my craft. I always enjoy learning more about photography.”

    Angela, who in 2015 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography from The Art Institute of San Antonio, says that her education provided the skills, knowledge, and business sense she needed to be successful in photography. “I learned about lighting, photographic design, portraiture, photojournalism, corporate and architecture, business practices, and so much more. All of this knowledge sets me apart from many photographers out there in the world.” She adds that current students should take their time and stay focused on their goals. “While you may pick up certain skills quickly, others may be more challenging. Life events, finances, and learning curves may seem to overwhelm at times—it happened to me—but don't let them discourage you from your goals and passion for what you want to do.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4262 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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  • The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston alumni Ayme Troas

    Ayme Troas

    Interior Design , 2015

    "My education [taught me] how to communicate with other designers. When they ask for particular items by name, I know exactly what they are talking about."

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    Ayme Troas

    Design and Sales for KBK to Trade

    Ayme Troas is working in design and sales for KBK to Trade in San Antonio, Texas. She assists designers in finding the right fabrics, furniture, accessories, and lighting for interior design projects. Ayme also works with vendors to get information for clients and to place orders. “The design industry is always evolving, as are the people. Every once in a while someone comes along and takes the industry by storm. I enjoy learning about the new trends and introducing them to our clients,” she says.

    Ayme finds creative inspiration in the world around her. “Whether it’s people, food, my surroundings, or a movement, there is always something that will spark a start to my next project.” Her creative heroes are people in the design industry who go above and beyond to reach the best possible design outcome. Looking to the future, Ayme believes that computer renderings will continue to improve—and will soon look like actual photographs. “The industry is headed toward more digital advances [including] creating applications for tablets or phones [that will allow designers to make] on-the-spot renderings. These [applications] would be extremely beneficial to designers who are always on the go.”

    Ayme, who in 2015 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design from The Art Institute of San Antonio, says that her education taught her the industry language as well as how to be a strong communicator. “When [other designers] ask for particular items by name, I know exactly what they are talking about and therefore I can help them more proficiently. I’m also able to quickly draft plans or create sketches to show custom pieces or room layouts.” She adds that current students should push their creativity and don’t hold back. “Find your signature style but don’t be afraid to explore others.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/2546 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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  • The Art Institute of San Antonio, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston alumni Sommer Bostick

    Sommer Bostick

    Media Arts & Animation , 2014

    "Working on game based training for the military has exposed me to things I never would be doing when I started at [The Art Institute of San Antonio]."

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    Sommer Bostick

    3D Modeler and Consultant for Booz Allen Hamilton

    Sommer Bostick is working as a 3D modeler and consultant for Booz Allen Hamilton on the San Antonio Riverwalk in Texas. She works on game based training for the military, and is responsible for creating and texturing 3D models, video editing, and demonstrating products and capabilities at marketing events. Sommer says that she learns something new each day. “I think that's one of the coolest things about being in the animation industry because when you have to model and animate something you know nothing about, you have to learn everything about it so you can accurately represent it.”

    Sommer is especially proud to have created a welcome video for Booz Allen Hamilton’s incoming CEO—it was played for hundreds of employees. “That video gained me recognition from leadership and other teams in the firm. I met and talked with the CEO one-on-one during the event [where the video] was played, and it was an amazing experience for me.” Since her video was viewed, Sommer says that the company’s leadership has relied on her more and more. “I realized how much I proved myself to my team, and the whole firm.”

    Sommer, who in 2014 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Media Arts & Animation from The Art Institute of San Antonio, says that her education provided her with the knowledge, tools, and skills she needed to transition into her current career. She recommends that current students give it everything they’ve got—even if it means taking a job that isn’t a “dream job.” “It’s experience and you need that.” She adds that the future of her industry lies in staying on top of new technology and developing applications and training. “Currently we are diving into virtual reality with technology like Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard. We are exploring how these technologies can benefit training in the military. I believe that virtual reality can go beyond that into health care and other professions, and be incredibly useful in training capabilities.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/2547 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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What Will I Study?

Culinary

I have the talent. I just need the skills.

Our Hospitality Food & Beverage Management curriculum will immerse you in the operation of both the front and the back of the house. You’ll explore both traditional and emerging international flavors and build relevant, marketable skills as you study:

  • Culinary Techniques
  • Classical Techniques
  • Merchandising for Foodservice
  • Hospitality Marketing
  • Catering & Event Management
  • Sales & Public Relations
  • Foodservice Technology & Information
  • Hospitality Industry & Industry Trends
  • Management by Menu
  • Nutrition
  • Purchasing and Controlling Costs
  • Garde Manger
  • Food and Beverage Management
  • World Cuisine
  • A la carte Kitchen
  • Human Resources
  • Strategic Planning and Marketing
  • Wine and Spirits Management


I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Hospitality Food & Beverage Management degree programs are built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But our “tough” comes with the support you need to make your creativity marketable. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. Here, you’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. So if your heart is telling you that you belong in a creative field, you belong here. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet our Faculty

  • Michael Becquet

    Michael J. Becquet

    Culinary Arts

    If it was easy, it wouldn't have value.

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    Michael J. Becquet

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I grew up with a love of food. My family included farmers and restaurateurs, and my father was a produce buyer for a grocery chain. But my most memorable moment was meeting Graham Kerr, the “Galloping Gourmet” from early 70’s TV. That’s when I knew I wanted to become a chef.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    By doing just that—I always try to bring my own personal real-life experiences into the classroom to help students connect theory to industry practice. I often add to that by having students conduct interviews with local chefs and restaurant owners.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    When my students meet with culinary professionals for those interviews, they not only get an opportunity to hear a new perspective, they also begin to learn the power of networking in the industry.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    That’s one of the most valuable benefits of studying here. By collaborating with their peers from different programs, students learn more, learn to work together, and develop professional friendships that’ll help them for the rest of their lives. That’s a big deal!

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    No one said it would be easy. If it was easy, it wouldn’t have value.

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  • Mike Buttles HS

    Mike Buttles

    Culinary Arts

    "One of the greatest assets of what we do is that culinary is the world’s most portable profession."

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    Mike Buttles
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    My first position, after graduating from the University of South Florida in rhetoric and public address (speech), was as a property manager and trainer for residential and commercial real estate. In a very short time, I was promoted to a position where I was responsible to train new managers. I look back on my successes and can wholly attribute them to an ability to see circumstances and issues, including what’s for dinner, through the eyes of others. Face it; cooking for others, not yourself, is the credo for any practicing chef. Armed with this background and an incredible understanding in fiscal decision making that came right along with it, I eagerly approached the next learning phase of my life; culinary school in Paris, France.


    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    During the past years, I have been an instructor, an historian, an executive chef, a restaurant consultant, a program director, and a student for a very enjoyable time. Needless to say, a lot of this overlapped. One of the greatest assets of what we do is that culinary is the world’s most portable profession. I try to share my experiences in the industry and also connect the dots historically for students who have not traveled or experienced as many different cuisines.  


    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    My classrooms encourage sharing ideas and experiences. When we critique food we talk about the flavors, textures, and techniques used to achieve a finish product. I also focus on the business of foodservice to ensure that students understand that being a professional cook or chef is different from cooking in your home. You need to understand how to manage resources and, most importantly, time.


    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    Collaboration in the food and beverage industry is how we take care of our guests. Assignments in my classes foster this collaboration so that students practice communication and partnership with others towards a common goal.  


    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    I teach students in my classes to be lifelong learners. I demonstrate to them that I am still learning and encourage them to not think of school as a thing you do once. Learning is a process of developing and engaging with the world to understand more over a much longer period of time.



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  • Christina M. Perrington, CEC

    Christina M. Perrington, CEC

    Culinary Arts

    Do what you love... life's too short not to enjoy it.

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    Christina M. Perrington, CEC

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    While I was serving during Operation Desert Storm/Desert Shield, I learned that one person could make a difference. I was a food service sergeant preparing meals for the soldiers in my unit. I used my years of experience and my creativity to make sure everything they ate was the best it could be. Good food boosts morale...and it’s my first love.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I use my life and professional experiences—good and bad—to add context to classroom lessons and help students better understand the material. My stepmother is from Vietnam, and I’ve traveled to many countries in Asia, which is why I specialize in Asian Cuisine.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I ask students to build a business plan...I love teaching the purchasing and cost-control aspect of it. I try to relate all the material to students’ everyday lives. Most of my students don’t like math, so I give them as many resources as possible to help them feel more confident with the project.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    They have a wonderful opportunity to work with students from other programs in their business plans, portfolios and menu design—not to mention the chance to make friends for life.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    My life philosophy is that the more I know, the more I know I don’t know. Life is really just an education outside the classroom. I love teaching students about food, which is my passion

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Do what you love...life’s too short not to enjoy it.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’ve been in the culinary industry for over 35 years, and I’ve seen many changes in the industry. But one thing has stayed the same: success takes hard work and perseverance. Food may be a necessity of life, but it’s also my passion. And it’s an honor to be able to teach what I love.

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  • Gary Rice

    Gary Rice, MBA

    Culinary Arts

    "Be true to yourself and work hard."

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    Gary Rice, MBA

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was 20 years old and recovering from a life-threatening illness, I began to see my life differently. I spent the better part of two years in physical, occupational, and speech therapy. After recovery I decided to take on a new challenge...to take my love of cooking and make a career out of it.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    With over two decades in the hospitality industry, I have plenty of real-world experience to share in the classroom. It all works into discussions on motivation, self-discipline, and pride. I use my contacts in the San Antonio area to bring in guest lecturers, take students on trips to hotels and restaurants, and bring them to seminars and restaurant association events where they can begin doing some networking.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I love to teach Capstone. It’s an all-encompassing class that lets me see just how much student have learned in my program. Watching them during their cooking practical shows me where the school is in terms of attention to teaching the core basics.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?


    Listen, ask questions, and stay current with trends and technology. Be true to yourself and work hard. Work in as many different places as you can when you’re young... explore the industry, then settle down and make a career of what you love best.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    As a program chair, I treat every student and every one of my team members as if they were family.

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  • Gregory Williams

    Gregory Williams, MBA, CEC

    Culinary Arts

    Never stop learning, and don't be afraid to fail.

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    Gregory Williams, MBA, CEC

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was around five years old, my brother and I opened a “restaurant” at our house for our friends. We set the kitchen floor on fire with a flaming grilled cheese sandwich. I’ve been cooking ever since.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I‘ve enjoyed plenty of success in this industry, but it’s my failures that I like to bring up in class. Students need to know that, as professionals, they’ll fail at something. The key is to not let it get you down...and to learn from every mistake, and every failure.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    It’s not a single assignment, but a class called À La Carte. I take a hands-off, advisory role and let the students take control of our student restaurant. The students help devise the menu, lay out the kitchen, and experience running an actual restaurant. When they’re empowered, when they’re praised for a job well done, students take the extra steps—and, in many cases, perform beyond their own perceived limits.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Many culinarians think that being a great cook is all it takes to succeed. Not true. All great restaurants work with other talented creative professionals to bring their vision to life. It takes photographers, graphic designers, web designers, interior designers, and more to create a restaurant. We’re all good at what we do, but few are good at everything. Collaboration lets each person play to their strengths to create something great.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Never stop learning, and don’t be afraid to fail. That’s the advice I’d give my younger self if I had the chance. The first part is simple—you can never learn too much. In our industry you can bet that your competition is up late doing research, practicing, or checking out new trends. Don’t lose out because you weren’t educated.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I always say that getting into teaching was my happy accident. I never thought I’d be in this role, and I’m glad I was given the chance. Being a part of people’s education, growth, and lifelong success is a great honor.

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  • Woods HS

    Mary Catherine Woods

    Baking & Pastry

    "Collaboration is essential in the kitchen. If one person falls behind, the whole kitchen falls behind."

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    Mary Catherine Woods
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Baking and Pastry wasn’t my very first choice when I went to college. Growing up, like many Pastry Chefs, I always loved to create desserts and experiment at home. I never really thought I could make it a career.  After graduating with a BS in Merchandising and Management from The University of Wisconsin, I went to work for a company in Atlanta within the wholesale industry. As time went on, my passion and interest in Baking and Pastry continued to grow. The restaurant scene in Atlanta was on the rise, and I found myself being drawn more to the culinary scene than my current career. I researched culinary schools, and I enrolled at The Art Institute of Atlanta. Once I started school, I ended my merchandising career and started working in restaurants. For me, it wasn’t one defining moment, but more of a progression and building of a passion.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    While we have a structured program, I am still able to show them different ways of producing or presenting different recipes. They need to know that just because the recipe states one way, many Chefs may produce it in another way. Simply telling them stories of my times in the industry allows them to ask questions that may not be otherwise asked and weaves into what we are producing at that time. I also take times during class to treat them as though they are my cooks and we have a certain menu to create and have done and presented by certain time, as though we are industry.  

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?


    Many students have the passion for this career, but at the same time can become overwhelmed once they are in the classroom. I try to break it down for them in terms they understand, as well as relate it to real life situations. Taking the time to work with them one on one as much as possible gives me an insight as to how they work, the way they organize, as well as their strengths and weaknesses. From here I try to help them turn their weaknesses into strengths, which in turn builds their confidence and they see just how much they can accomplish.

    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?


    Collaboration is essential in the kitchen. If one person falls behind, the whole kitchen falls behind. Constant communication within a team is crucial, and is something I try to ingrain in students. Asking for help is not weakness, it’s strength. When the students are in groups, it only reinforces what type of environment they will be working in.  

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    To be a team player, listen, and ask for help when needed. Learn from your fellow cooks and Chefs. Not only will you learn skills that will advance you to the next level, but you may also learn what NOT to do when you climb the ranks in the kitchen. Always observe and never stop learning. Even when you graduate and are in the industry, go to other kitchens to do a stage for a day or two. You will be amazed at what you learn from other people, and in turn will help you grow.

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  • Vanessa Langton Portrait

    Vanessa Langton

    General Education

    "Work hard and always give your best—your work is a direct representation of yourself and your abilities!"

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    Vanessa Langton
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a kid I made drawings regularly. When fellow students and teachers began to recognize my potential, I thought maybe there was something to art and creative expression. My mother nurtured my interests in art by taking me to museums regularly to look at the works of great artists and she bought me art supplies to practice. I knew very young that I could not live without art and art history in my life.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    Prior to teaching art history I worked as a graphic designer and I know what it is like to be an ambitious art student trying to prep a portfolio to hunt for a job. As an art historian, I also know how important it is to be able to describe your artwork through written and spoken words. Through art history, students learn not only about different eras in art, but they also learn how to talk about art. These skills can be applied to any area of study—graphic design, the culinary arts, game art design, photography, etc.

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    At the end of each quarter, my students are required to give an oral presentation. Not only does the student have to research a specific artist or art era, but they have to put together a slide show, a script, and present this to a room of their peers. This pushes the student towards a goal as they are faced with a deadline.

    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    Perhaps when students are assigned to work together they end up discussing their chosen areas of studies through a critical point of view and look beyond the surface to acquire meaning. They could question the who, what, and why using methods of formal analysis to all areas of the creative spectrum.

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    Work hard and always give your best—your work is a direct representation of yourself and your abilities!

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  • Meghan Pearson HS

    Meghan Pearson

    General Education

    "You only get one body. Take care of it!"

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    Meghan Pearson
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a dietitian, I’m more of a math and science person, however interacting with aspiring creative professionals in the classroom offers new perspectives on my field and adds a nice balance to my work.  I like to think my background in the sciences helps to balance the creative careers of my students as well.  

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    Nutrition is a unique course in that it applies to everyone on an individual level.  Everybody eats, so everybody can benefit from this class if they choose to.  I like to utilize my professional experience to create opportunities for students to learn hands-on by applying what they’re learning to their own lives, in addition to sharing real-life examples to demonstrate key concepts.

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    I try to balance educating my students on the facts about my field while also encouraging them to form their own opinions about nutrition.  Our class discussions probably best exemplify this approach.  Opening the floor for students to share their opinions on potentially polarizing topics provides an opportunity for individuals’ beliefs, biases, and opinions to be challenged.  Sometimes opinions are changed and sometimes they’re strengthened; but what’s just as important as becoming better informed on these topics is learning how to disagree with peers in a way that is respectful, mature, and constructive.  This is a skill that will take them far in any field.

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    I believe the single most important thing I impart to my students is teaching them to be informed consumers.  My class addresses how to interpret nutrition research, making wise choices in the grocery store, restaurants, and safety in over-the-counter supplements.  I won’t always be there to answer their questions, so my most important job is teaching them how to find the answers themselves.    

    The most critical advice I can offer a student embarking on a creative career is to take care of yourself.  Care for your body and your health.  Your body enables you to pursue your dreams, and your health will directly impact your daily life.  You only get one body.  Take care of it.

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