Marketing

Marketing

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Build your own brand.

It’s all about using words, images, strategies, and insights to create memorable ad campaigns, build strong brands, draw traffic to events, and express yourself.

Program Areas

San Antonio Advertising Programs

Advertising

Nevaldo Shepherd

Advertising , 2013

The Art Institute of Atlanta

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Studying the creative and business sides of the industry, you can learn to think both strategically and creatively as you prepare to build brands—including your own.

Meet our Faculty

  • San Antonio Architecture & Design Instructor Analy Diego

    Analy Diego

    Interior Design

    "As a designer, you'll never lose. You'll either win, or you'll learn."

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    Analy Diego

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was introduced to the art world at the age of six by my grandfather, a skilled caricaturist. From that moment, I knew I wanted to create and inspire for the rest of my life.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I believe all design students are creatively unique, and as such they should be taught in a way that enhances their individual learning styles and passions. All my assignments allow students to explore opportunities and seek answers on their own...my main goal is to help them learn to think critically, and to have their own voice as designers.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    As an example, the window assignments with visual merchandising force students to push themselves creatively in ways that they haven’t before. After completing the assignment, they’re extremely proud to have work they can add to their portfolio

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?


    Collaboration plays a major role in all design work. Encouraging students to reach out to one another to solve problems and share knowledge not only builds teamwork and leadership skills, but leads to deeper learning and understanding.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    As a designer, you’ll never lose. You’ll either win, or you’ll learn.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I like to think of myself as a storyteller...only I use art instead of words.

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  • San Antonio Baking & Pastry Instructor JiYoung Daily

    JiYoung Daily

    Baking & Pastry

    "Becoming what you always wanted to be is 10% talent and 90% effort."

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    JiYoung Daily

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    It happened when I worked at Panya Bakery, a Japanese Fusion Bakery in New York City, under pastry chef Tina San. She helped ignite my passion, curiosity, knowledge, and love for the art of baking and pastry.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?


    My 15 years of pastry chef experience makes me aware of what kind of culinarians the industry is looking for. Sharing what I’ve learned from working in the world of hotels, catering firms, restaurants, private clubs, wedding cake businesses, and chocolate shops helps give my students a feel for the real world.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In my Chocolate and Showpiece class, students are make an edible showpiece of chocolate or sugar. I encourage them to have a plan including a sketch, all the steps, color scheme, and tools they need to make the showpiece. While they’re working on their project, I make my own showpiece with them to demonstrate various techniques and artistry.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    In the beginning, they’re a little overwhelmed working in a medium they’ve never used before. But by encouraging them to have a plan, and by mentoring them along the way, it becomes manageable. At the end of the project, students are proud of what they’ve accomplished—and they’re inspired to do more.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?


    One successful person can be powerful, but a team of people is even more powerful. Learning synergy and teamwork shows students the importance of working together to accomplish a goal.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Pastry Art is a field that lets you express who you are as a person and as an artist. I encourage students to have fun and be proud of themselves.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Love what you do, and focus on your goal. Becoming what you always wanted to be is 10% talent and 90% effort.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’m passionate about sharing my baking and pastry experience with my students. I love helping them shape their future as a pastry chef, baker, chocolatier, culinary manager, or food artist.

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  • San Antonio Fashion Instructor Karen Henry

    Karen Henry

    Fashion Marketing & Management

    "I've learned that it's extremely important for students to know they have someone to help guide their success."

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    Karen Henry

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Owning and and operating an apparel store opened my eyes to the importance of being creative in the retail industry. And it inspired me to share what I’d learned with Fashion students in the classroom.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share everything from what to expect when attending tradeshows to how to be a great retail manager to the importance of knowing your customers, and choosing the right product mix for stores. And because I know how important it is to network with key people to get a good start in the retail industry, I arrange field trips so students can speak with industry professionals—and invite those professionals into the classroom.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    For my Sales & Event Promotion class I assign a visual merchandising (window display) project. Students work as a team to come up with a theme, budget, props, background, visual elements, and ways to communicate their message. Using this approach with a window display assignment allows the students to work as a team, be creative individually and collectively, understand budgeting, and learn how to communicate a message visually.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?


    As an example, the window assignments with visual merchandising force students to push themselves creatively in ways that they haven’t before. After completing the assignment, they’re extremely proud to have work they can add to their portfolio

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    It lets them network and learn about each other and their various projects. They get a deeper understanding of an area that may not be their strong point, learn to take responsibility for themselves and each other, and build positive relationships.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I think the most valuable thing is my time and attention. I work with students one-on- one to make sure they succeed in my class and the real world. I’ve learned that it’s extremely important for students to know they have someone to help guide their success.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?


    Always do your best, be professional and punctual, and work as if someone’s watching you at all times.

    Anything else?

    I thoroughly enjoy teaching students about the fashion industry, using my expertise to equip them for success.

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  • San Antonio Visual Effects & Motion Graphics Lead Instructor Thomas Brecheisen

    Thomas Brecheisen

    Visual Effects & Motion Graphics

    "Work hard, be determined, and know that someone else out there is working harder, studying harder, and 'sleeping faster' to compete for the exact same job."

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    Thomas Brecheisen

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve always been involved in the creative arts—and I always knew I’d be somehow involved in education. I just happened to find a particular love for the cinematic arts, especially visual effects. I put my heart and soul into perfecting my craft, always with the eventual goal of teaching.

    How do you help prepare students for a professional career?

    Students in my Intro to Visual Effects class don’t create space robots, explosions that level cities, or epic light saber duels. They study the career possibilities in the visual effects and motion graphics industry. And they get a road map to guide their journey through to their Portfolio classes, which add clarity and direction to what they’ve studied. After completing all the classes leading to Portfolio, they’ll have the skills, materials, and experience to create a professional reel that can lead to their dream career.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I strive to infuse a sense of purpose into each of my students. There’s a purpose behind each class, each assignment, and each friendly chat in the hallway. When students feel they have a goal-centered purpose, nothing can stop them from achieving their potential. I consider it my purpose to mentor students—not only bring them knowledge, but empower them to succeed.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    The visual effects industry is the epitome of collaboration. That’s why I expect students to work with peers from others departments to capture and create their effects. Visual Effects & Motion Graphics students work with Photography, Game Design, Animation, and Digital Film students on most of their projects. If you stay in your seat long enough after a movie, you’ll see that most of the people who worked on that film are visual effects professionals. Everyone has a part to play, and we rely heavily on expertise from other programs to achieve our goals.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Early on, I ask my students what they think employers look for. I usually get the expected answers: talent, passion, dedication, and skill. They’re surprised when I tell them that those things will help, but the real answer is, “Can you make someone else money?” I learned very early in my career that this is show business, not show dedication or show passion. We’re trying to make a product to sell. That’s the bottom line. The two most important things I can help a student develop are craft and confidence. If they come out of school with these two traits, they can be very successful in the film business.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Work hard, be determined, and know that someone else out there is working harder, studying harder, and “sleeping faster” to compete for the exact same job. If I can do one thing for students, it’s to instill in them a work ethic to maximize their chances for success.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My calling is to inspire students to reach their full potential so they can share their amazing talents with the world.

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  • San Antonio Digital Film & Video Production Instructor Toby Lawrence

    Toby Lawrence

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

    "Let your passion be your guide."

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    Toby Lawrence

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was six, my family went to the opening night of Star Wars. I was completely drawn into the story and, as far as I was concerned, I was Luke Skywalker. I mean, what six-year-old doesn't dream of saving the universe? I got involved with music and drama in school, and began to realize that my way of using "The Force" would be to make movies of my own.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I believe educators should be transparent about their own processes and work. I bring the real-world, rubber-to-the-road context of my own experience to the curriculum, and I find that students are more engaged for doing so. It helps me develop each student's vision and potential in a way that translates out in the competitive world of filmmaking.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    The best example is the short media project. Students produce their first fully-informed project from script-to-screen as a director/writer/producer. They secure the talent, crew, and location releases, and edit and present their finished projects for the screen. I serve as the "guide on the side,” mentoring them through the process.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I often recount past professional experiences to assure students that I’m not asking them to do anything I haven’t already done myself. We work together to find solutions to their creative challenges and realize their vision "on time and under budget."

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    One of the first—and most crucial—things to understand about filmmaking is that it’s a collaborative art. The hard work and talent of many are behind any great film. I always encourage my students to reach out to peers from other disciplines to enlist their expertise.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?


    Film is a passion art. Filmmaking requires grit and determination to actualize that passion. It also relies on its creator to use ever-changing technologies, software, and work-flows not available in the past. This evolution means greater accessibility and ease of use for student filmmakers seeking to fulfill their dreams. But it’s our responsibility as educators to help them balance all that technological freedom with the core principles of filmmaking: screenwriting, producing, directing, editing, cinematography and lighting.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Let your passion be your guide, but always remember to balance it with common sense.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Teaching is not just the transmission of knowledge. The standard should be to create an environment that stimulates intellectual and creative growth, encouraging students to develop through their own initiative.

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