Art Institutes

Design &Technical Graphics

I want to solve problems with my ideas.

There’s no shortage of visual communications challenges out there. In settings from manufacturing to medical research, from science to sports training, construction to communication, there’s never been more of a need for thinkers who can create visual simulations in a wide range of applications, including computer-aided design (CAD), 2D and 3D digital imaging, technical illustrations, and business graphics. If you’re willing to go all-in, the path to your creative begins with our Design & Technical Graphics degree program. You’ll work with professional-grade technology as you prepare to solve the toughest design problems—and helping you launch a career doing what you love. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. It won’t be easy. If it was, anybody could do it.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science in Design & Technical Graphics

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Timeframe:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Science in Design & Technical Graphics

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3447 for complete Gainful Employment information for this degree.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience


I can't wait to show what I can do.

As organizations present information on a growing array of increasingly sophisticated media, there’s a need for confident, creative minds to develop visual simulations. Our program is equal parts visualization, production, and technology. In our collaborative environment, you’ll start with basics like color and design fundamentals, perspective drawing, and drafting. From there, you’ll progress to areas including CAD/CAM (computer-aided manufacturing) freehand drawing, typography, and page layout. We’ll help you build such skills as 2D and 3D modeling, digital imaging, and technical illustration. You’ll study business applications including file management, production technology, and professional practices. You’ll explore linear perspective, visual composition, and theatrical staging to create interactive digital 3D environments. And you’ll have the opportunity to construct a prototype model of a consumer product. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet our Alumni

  • Danielle Heredia HS

    Danielle Heredia

    Design & Technical Graphics , 2015

    “If you don’t look forward to working with your clients and your company, what’s the point?"

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    Danielle Heredia

    Graphic Designer, Combines Technical Knowledge with Interior Design and Engineering

    Danielle Heredia is a graphic designer for Spfm. Lp. in San Antonio, Texas. She assists the lead designer in creating and revising graphic designs. Danielle transferred into The Art Institute of San Antonio from Texas State University. “The program is what pulled me—Design & Technical Graphics was a new degree there. It is a graphic design degree [that incorporates] technical background knowledge such as conceptual product design, interior design, and engineering,” she says.

    Danielle admits that the coursework was tough, but is thankful that she stuck with it. Now that she’s working in the field, she says that she’s constantly learning on the job. “I had to adjust to managing multiple projects for multiple companies. To some this may not be a very big obstacle, but for a freshly graduated graphic designer starting her professional career, I wanted to get this down right.”

    Her passion for her job and pride in her workplace motivate Danielle. “If you don’t look forward to working with your clients and your company, what’s the point? You should be proud of your work.” She adds that she feels gratified when a client understands why she’s chosen a particular layout. “My job is not only to appeal to the company graphically but to communicate a message successfully through graphics.”

    Danielle, who in 2015 earned a Bachelor of Science in Design & Technical Graphics from The Art Institute of San Antonio, says that her education provided a well-rounded view of the design field. “This degree broadened my field of knowledge.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3447 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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What Will I Study?

Study Section

I'm ready to get down to business.

The Design & Technical Graphics program is as demanding, exacting, and rigorous as the real world challenges from which it’s drawn. The learning is hands-on and focused on helping you develop the skills to create design solutions. You'll study and gain skills in:

  • Design Fundamentals
  • Perspective Drawing
  • Drafting
  • CAD/CAM Freehand Drawing
  • Typography
  • Page Layout
  • 2-D and 3-D Modeling
  • Digital Imaging
  • Technical Illustration
  • File Management
  • Production Technology
  • Professional Practices
  • Linear Perspective
  • Visual Composition
  • Prototype Modeling


I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Design & Technical Graphics degree program is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we temper the tough with the support you need to make your creativity marketable. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. Here, you’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. So if your heart is telling you that you belong in a creative field, you belong here. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet our Faculty

  • Kenny Lantz

    Kenny Lantz

    Design & Technical Graphics

    "Stay humble—there's always more to learn."

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    Kenny Lantz

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I always had an interest in many different things, and fine arts was the only way I figured out how to do all of them. Once I decided on a career doing something I love, the direction was easy—though the path was a difficult one.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    As a professional artist, my experience is one of constant problem-solving. In my opinion, the skills needed to succeed at anything in life are the same: problem-solving and communication. Another important skill I emphasize is working through a design process. I share my own process with students, and demonstrate how it helps me solve design challenges.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    One of my favorite assignments is all about process and discovery. In my advanced drawing class, we build a sketchbook from a single sheet of paper, by hand. We cut, fold, and sew-bind it. Students then pick a theme, and every drawing in that book must fit that theme. It’s very rewarding for the students to create a book that they’ve spent so much time on...they can really see the progression of thoughts and ideas.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    I’ve taught a lot of art foundation courses, which bring together students from across disciplines. It’s awesome to see how different programs tackle the same project. For instance, an animation student is way different in their approach than an interior design student. When we critique, the various students always bring a fresh set of ideas for all of us to think about.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    The most important part of my teaching philosophy—and the skill I want to impart on all my students—is the ability to problem-solve. It will get them through school and through life.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    You need to stay humble—there’s always more to learn. Anyone who thinks they’re finished learning and knows all there is to know can only begin to forget.

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  • Judy Ruvuna

    Judy Ruvuna

    Interior Design

    "Don’t be afraid to fail—failure has generated some of the most innovative design solutions."

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    Judy Ruvuna

    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was intensely curious as a child, always asking, "Why?" I wanted to know how things worked and frequently created my own toys by pulling things apart to create the toys.  Drawing eventually became a way for “keeping me out of trouble” by creating things on paper.  I realized that I wanted to be a creative professional in high school when I created a set for a play that I had written.  Building the set and painting the scenes was a lot of work; it also made me realize how powerful design could be.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    I design projects and assignments to improve the student’s critical thinking and problem-solving skills and use my industry experience to bring real-world context to the material that I teach in the classroom.  I make sure that the students have a clear understanding of the design process and explore typical questions and problems associated with each phase of the design process. This allows the students to learn how to conceptualize, explore, define and produce. The students then go into the production phase with the best possible design solutions for every project they work on.  They also learn how to communicate, critique, provide feedback and collaborate on ideas as if were working in industry.   

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    When students come to CAD I (Computer Aided Drafting) they are initially a bit overwhelmed; some of them having never used a computer to draw or design.  Each new group of students come into the class with different skill sets; the challenge is to get all the students ready to design their final project and produce a set of construction documents.  I use targeted assignments, tutoring and create a collaborative learning environment.  The students are always amazed at what they can do.   

    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    Collaborating and sharing ideas is vital for generating new and innovative ideas.  In my classes where I have Interior Design and Design & Technical Graphics students, collaboration has produced some really interesting projects.  Students are exposed to a different way of thinking and solving problems.

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    Find something that you are really passionate about, work hard, and don’t be afraid to fail. Failure has generated some of the most innovative design solutions.  Remember that the world is full of creative designers; never ever stop learning.


    Is there anything else you'd like us to know about you, your experience, or your role as a faculty member at The Art Institutes?


    I had always been concerned that having a background in Textiles, Interior Design, Architecture and Historic Preservation, I would have to choose. As a faculty member at The Art Institute of San Antonio, I get to use all of my experience.

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  • Marilyn Ibey HS

    Dr. Marilyn Ibey

    General Education

    "Attitude is the aroma of the soul."

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    Dr. Marilyn Ibey
    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    The defining moment of my life was the two successful heart surgeries of my third daughter at age 6 in 1984.  It was then that I devoted my life to the health, education and welfare of my four children and to my future grandchildren, and to my future students in teaching science.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?


    I received my Bachelor in science from McGill University in 1972.  I married and raised my four children while getting my Secondary Science Teacher Certification, working part-time in retail, and doing volunteer work.  After I started teaching science at Northside ISD , I earned my Masters of Arts in Molecular Biology from University of The Incarnate Word in 1997.  Then in 2013, I earned my Doctorate in Educational Policy and Leadership from University of Texas at San Antonio. I published an article in the European Journal of Math and Science in January 2016.  I guess you could say that I am a life-long learner and science educator, as well as the matriarch of my family.

    I have taught secondary science for 20 years and  college science for the last five years. I know how to impart the interdisciplinary science knowledge and skills needed for science literacy to sustain life on this planet in this day and age.  I also impress upon my students that success any professional capacity requires self-discipline. critical thinking, and teamwork beyond having  the necessary knowledge and skills.

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    I interview each student about their art and aspirations.  Then I assign them a Power Point and oral presentation about one career in Biology.  The students come to see that Biology is a huge and diverse area of scientific endeavor and that biologists, as artists, are very  passionate and devoted to their fields.

    What role does collaboration contribute to students' success, especially when students from other programs contribute to the same project?

    All future professional jobs require some degree of collaboration or teamwork to produce a top quality product.  Considering others’ contributions and  perspectives from inside and outside the field, and receiving support from team members are the keys to success.

    In your opinion, what is the single most important thing you impart to your students to help them succeed in your class and in the real world? Alternatively, what is the most critical advice you would offer any student as he / she embarks on a creative career?

    I tell students to follow their professional passion and their careers will always be a source of joy and inspiration.

    Is there anything else you'd like us to know about you, your experience, or your role as a faculty member at The Art Institutes?

    Science teaching at The Art Institute of San Antonio has broadened my art of teaching diverse students. I am inspired by the contagious creative passion!


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  • Lauran Drown HS

    Lauran Drown

    Interior Design

    "I like assignments that build on one another and interrelate, as this is how project-based professionals work."

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    Lauran Drown

    What would you say is the defining moment in your life when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a child, I could not do without drawing and it was a major outlet for me. As an undergraduate architecture student, however, I questioned myself. People going in and out of buildings interested me more than the buildings themselves and I wondered whether I shouldn’t do something else. Getting out and seeing the world, other cities, other nations, during and after college, especially ancient places with peeling layers, opened my eyes to the richness and diversity of the human habitat and revealed how it was a reciprocal relationship between culture and the built environment. I couldn’t let go after that. 

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience to provide an industry veteran's sense of the realities / challenges / opportunities of the profession?

    Each project or assignment in my courses serves a purpose and is designed with real-world expectations in mind. I like assignments that build on one another and interrelate, as this is how project-based professionals work. I also try to relate what I am doing in my work, too. For instance, I’ve taken students to the Habitat for Humanity site where I also work part time. They document the homes in different stages, draw a wall section, interview staff. It relates directly to the coursework, but also familiarizes them with being on a worksite and presenting professionally. In the future, they’ll get on site for work and be able to say, "Yeah, I did this already."

    Is there a class assignment that exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring? Similarly, how does your approach inspire each student to push themselves beyond their own perceived limits?

    The true classroom for architecture and interior design is right outside the classroom and I try to get students out there with assignments or field trips as much as possible. In one assignment for Programming and Space Planning, each student spent four consecutive hours in a public space, observing and documenting a list of conditions. They were uncomfortable with the idea at first, but in the end told me how time flew and some even returned the following week to clarify questions brought up in their presentations. In Building and Mechanical Systems, we got on chairs and carefully took down ceiling tiles in the hallway to see into the plenum. The attention they got for doing that made it a memorable experience and more dynamic than simply reading about HVAC and sprinkler systems in a book.

    Is there anything else you'd like us to know about you, your experience, or your role as a faculty member at The Art Institutes?

    I am a licensed architect with a Master of Architecture from McGill University and a Bachelor of Science in Architecture from the University of Cincinnati. Here in San Antonio, I have my own practice called Bucrane Design Build. I also work part time for Habitat for Humanity and am currently the vice president of the Earthen Construction Initiative, a non-profit organization whose mission is to advance and promote earthen construction in the Central Texas region and beyond.

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