Culinary_Arts

CulinaryArts

I'm ready to take on the world.

For you, food isn’t just what you eat. It’s somewhere between how you express your creativity and who you are as a person. And at a time when culinary tastes are evolving and cultural barriers are disappearing, the industry needs people like you. In our Culinary Arts degree programs, you’ll be immersed in an environment that’s as close to the real world as it gets. Working in a modern, professional kitchen, you can hone your cooking skills as you focus on learning to deliver the popular international flavors and techniques today’s consumers—and employers—want and expect. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. It’ll take everything you’ve got. But it can lead to a career where you do what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Science in Culinary Arts

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Associate of Science in Culinary Arts

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/367 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will have the opportunity to:

  • Establish and maintain safety and sanitation procedures.
  • Prepare standardized recipes using a variety of cooking techniques which meet industry quality standards.
  • Prepare a variety of international recipes utilizing the correct techniques, ingredients and equipment which meet industry quality standards.
  • Describe and perform tasks related to common business practices in the culinary industry, including inventory, menu planning, cost control, and food purchasing.
  • Describe the principles of food and beverage management.
  • Define and articulate the core values of the culinary professional.

View Academic Catalog

Diploma in Art of Cooking

Quarter Credit Hours:
55
Timeframe:
4 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Diploma in Art of Cooking

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/2765 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will have the opportunity to:

  • Establish and maintain safety and sanitation procedures.
  • Prepare standardized recipes using a variety of cooking techniques which meet industry quality standards.
  • Prepare a variety of recipes of utilizing the correct techniques, ingredients and equipment which meet industry quality standards.
  • Define and articulate the core values of the culinary professional.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

If it was easy, I wouldn't be interested.

As global cuisines become more and more prevalent, the culinary world becomes more and more competitive, fueled largely by the growing need to provide those global cuisines to demanding and discerning consumers. That’s where our program meets your future. Starting with fundamentals like knife skills, using kitchen tools, and developing culinary techniques, we’ll guide you through everything from basic cuts to managing a menu to working as part of a team. Each course builds on what you’ve had the opportunity to learn—and that curriculum includes more than 20 popular international cuisines, including Latin, Asian, and American Regional. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet Our Faculty

  • San Diego Program Coordinator of General Education Mary Broding

    Mary Broding

    Graphic & Web Design

    "I learn from my students every day. That's what I love most about teaching."

    Read More
    Mary Broding

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was in Paris with my high school French club, viewing impressionist work at the Musée d'Orsa. Walking past Monet's Rouen Cathedral series, I was stunned by how paint could achieve the effect of atmospheric shimmer. I walked through the Impressionist section many times, in a haze, absolutely taken with the work. That’s when I knew I wanted to study art history, and either work in an art museum or teach art history.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I primarily teach College English and Creative Nonfiction, and I bring my love of the written word to class. Many of my students have struggled with writing in the past so I ask them to write about something they’re comfortable with and interested in. I want to help them build the confidence they’ll need to express themselves in writing, no matter what profession they choose.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I’m all about experiential learning, getting students out of the classroom and into the community. I recently took my Creative Nonfiction class to the Cannibalism exhibit at the San Diego Museum of Man—then had them write an essay on whether they’d ever consider taking part in cannibalism. Students were eager to respond and ready to back up their answer to the question, drawing from what they’d learned at the exhibit.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    No one is an island, especially today. Students need to learn to be able to get along and be productive with people from different personal and professional backgrounds.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Writing is a constant learning process. Once I let students know that I have a hard time with certain aspects of it, they know it‘s okay for them to struggle, too.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be realistic. You’re going to fail—and that’s okay. In fact, failing will help make you stronger at whatever you do.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I truly care about our students. We have a fantastic bunch of individuals here who bring a vast variety of experience and knowledge to the table. I learn from my students every day. That’s what I love most about teaching.

    Read More...
  • "Listen with your eyes."

    Richard Ybarra

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Listen with your eyes."

    Read More
    Richard Ybarra

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was born with a good eye for design. As a child, I drew on the walls in our home. In high school I progressed to graffiti. While studying art and photography in college, I entered gallery art exhibitions and won a few awards. That’s when I began to consider design as a career. Working in ad agencies and design firms fueled my ambition and creativity, and allowed me to explore other areas of art and design.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    With 37 years in the advertising/design profession and 25 years of teaching, I bring a lot of creativity and knowledge to the classroom. I draw on all that experience depending on the classroom situation.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My class projects let students apply their creative skills and talents to corporate branding, typography, and conceptual design. I encourage them to think smart and work smart. I share my passion, knowledge, and wisdom, and help them develop the independent thinking and organizational skills to become more confident and produce better work. The more they learn about themselves, the more creative they become.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Working as part of a team helps students understand the process of a given project, and also helps them learn to communicate...to present their work both visually and verbally.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be more aware of what’s happening in the real world. Read at least one daily newspaper to get a better sense of reality. Attend business and social events to improve your networking skills. Find a good mentor, someone who’s walked the path to success. And most of all, listen with your eyes.

    Read More...

What Will I Study?

Culinary_Arts

This is my passion. This is my time.

There’s nothing easy about our Culinary Arts curriculum, which will immerse you in both traditional and emerging flavors from every corner of the world. You’ll cover a range of cuisines from Mexican to Middle Eastern as you study:

  • Culinary Techniques
  • Classical Techniques
  • Sanitation & Safety
  • Baking and Pastry Techniques
  • Management by Menu
  • Nutrition
  • Garde Manger
  • Foodservice Technology
  • Food & Beverage Operations Management
  • Planning & Controlling Costs
  • World Cuisine
  • American Regional Cuisine
  • Asian Cuisine
  • Latin Cuisine
  • A la carte Kitchen
  • Art Culinaire

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Culinary Arts degree programs are built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But along with that toughness comes all the support you’ll need at every step along the way. That’s why we provide the mentoring and real-world experience to help you prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field, along with opportunities to learn that go far beyond our kitchens. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • San Diego Program Coordinator of General Education Mary Broding

    Mary Broding

    Graphic & Web Design

    "I learn from my students every day. That's what I love most about teaching."

    Read More
    Mary Broding

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was in Paris with my high school French club, viewing impressionist work at the Musée d'Orsa. Walking past Monet's Rouen Cathedral series, I was stunned by how paint could achieve the effect of atmospheric shimmer. I walked through the Impressionist section many times, in a haze, absolutely taken with the work. That’s when I knew I wanted to study art history, and either work in an art museum or teach art history.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I primarily teach College English and Creative Nonfiction, and I bring my love of the written word to class. Many of my students have struggled with writing in the past so I ask them to write about something they’re comfortable with and interested in. I want to help them build the confidence they’ll need to express themselves in writing, no matter what profession they choose.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I’m all about experiential learning, getting students out of the classroom and into the community. I recently took my Creative Nonfiction class to the Cannibalism exhibit at the San Diego Museum of Man—then had them write an essay on whether they’d ever consider taking part in cannibalism. Students were eager to respond and ready to back up their answer to the question, drawing from what they’d learned at the exhibit.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    No one is an island, especially today. Students need to learn to be able to get along and be productive with people from different personal and professional backgrounds.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Writing is a constant learning process. Once I let students know that I have a hard time with certain aspects of it, they know it‘s okay for them to struggle, too.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be realistic. You’re going to fail—and that’s okay. In fact, failing will help make you stronger at whatever you do.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I truly care about our students. We have a fantastic bunch of individuals here who bring a vast variety of experience and knowledge to the table. I learn from my students every day. That’s what I love most about teaching.

    Read More...
  • "Listen with your eyes."

    Richard Ybarra

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Listen with your eyes."

    Read More
    Richard Ybarra

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was born with a good eye for design. As a child, I drew on the walls in our home. In high school I progressed to graffiti. While studying art and photography in college, I entered gallery art exhibitions and won a few awards. That’s when I began to consider design as a career. Working in ad agencies and design firms fueled my ambition and creativity, and allowed me to explore other areas of art and design.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    With 37 years in the advertising/design profession and 25 years of teaching, I bring a lot of creativity and knowledge to the classroom. I draw on all that experience depending on the classroom situation.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My class projects let students apply their creative skills and talents to corporate branding, typography, and conceptual design. I encourage them to think smart and work smart. I share my passion, knowledge, and wisdom, and help them develop the independent thinking and organizational skills to become more confident and produce better work. The more they learn about themselves, the more creative they become.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Working as part of a team helps students understand the process of a given project, and also helps them learn to communicate...to present their work both visually and verbally.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be more aware of what’s happening in the real world. Read at least one daily newspaper to get a better sense of reality. Attend business and social events to improve your networking skills. Find a good mentor, someone who’s walked the path to success. And most of all, listen with your eyes.

    Read More...