Film_Production

Film& Production

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Pick your medium. Maximize your impact.

Put your ideas, your passion, even yourself out there to entertain, inform, or compel audiences. Whatever your form of expression, we’ll help you create a future.

Program Areas

Audio_Production

Audio Production

You can learn to record, edit, mix, and master digital audio as you produce live and studio music, and designing sound for film, radio, TV, web, and live performances.

Digital Photography Program

Digital Photography

Harlen Capen

Digital Photography , 2015

The Art Institute of Virginia Beach, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta

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Learn hands-on with digital video cameras, editing, and graphics software as you tell stories in media ranging from broadcast news to motion pictures.

Meet Our Faculty

  • Kathie Taylor

    Kathie Taylor

    Fashion Design

    "One of my favorite assignments is when students create designs for a local, upscale boutique for the chance to actually sell it there."

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    Kathie Taylor
    What drew you to become a creative professional?

    In my career as a journalist and in the fashion industry, I understood that communication was the common thread between my love for each fields. Both fashion and journalism seek to communicate what is taking place in the world at the moment. They are both powerful expressions of the times, and a reflection of our need to create constant change.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I often use examples of my experiences in the classroom – both good and bad. It’s my way of preparing my students better than I was prepared to start out in the industry. Students need to know, now more than ever, the realities of working in fashion, so any opportunity I have to impart that knowledge, I use.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    This industry is very competitive. And a great way to challenge students is to give them some healthy competition in the classroom. One of my favorite assignments is when students create designs for a local, upscale boutique for the chance to actually sell it there. Prior to the visit, they research the store to better understand what would sell in that store. When we take the trip to the boutique we meet with the owner who sits with each student and briefly reviews their designs, lets them know if they are on target and gives them advice on how to improve. They then take that input, update their designs and then pattern and sew the garments. The boutique owner then visits our classroom to see the outcome of the projects and decides which one will be featured in his store for sale. The garment gets displayed in the store with a placard that describes the collaboration between The Art Institute of California—San Diego and the boutique. It is a very rewarding and real life experience for students.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    This is the synergy I love about The Art Institute of California—San Diego. I graduated from the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM), which is only a fashion school. Our fashion students at Ai often collaborate with other students on projects, particularly those in photography and graphic design. And even occasionally with our culinary baking and pastry students. It’s a win, win for all as it teaches how different perspectives can contribute to something unique and new.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I often tell students to be patient with themselves, push your creativity and don’t give up. Fashion is a constantly changing industry–there is always room for more. Persistence pays off.

    Anything else?


    As a designer, I established my own line of women’s non-traditional suits, under the label ARTICLES, that was picked up by Nordstrom’s Savvy Department buyers in Los Angeles, San Diego and local boutiques.

    After receiving contracts as a freelance designer for manufacturers on the east and west coasts, I established a clothing label, JONZ, which was showcased at The Fashion Group International's (FGI) annual Style Awards show. My unique belts and handbags have also made celebrity television appearances, and can been seen in editorials for WWD and Vogue Magazine.

    In addition, my artful designs have also been showcased in local museums. I have even costumed theatre productions of Peter Pan & Wendy and The Laramie Project. Read More...
  • Jessica Newman

    Jessica Newman

    Interior Design

    "Have a passion for drawing and design."

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    Jessica Newman

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I always knew I’d be an artist. I've been drawing my entire life. It just seemed like a natural and obvious fit.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    When I first meet students, I show them my portfolio so they can get a sense of my work and who I am as an interior designer. I’ve worked in large firms, mid-size firms, small firms, and as a freelancer. So I talk about interior design from many points of view to give the students an idea of which type of environment they’d like to work in.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In my Sketch and Ideation class, I begin each session with a 30-minute drawing. We have two cups—one labeled “spaces,” the other “styles.” The space cup is filled with slips of paper with different types of interior spaces written on them...penthouse living room, exterior courtyard, etc. The styles cup features different motifs like industrial and art deco. Students choose one slip from each cup, then we draw the space and style combination. This exercise helps them in two important ways. First, the only way to get better at drawing is to draw; second, it helps shift their attitude away from focusing only on the outcome of a particular drawing.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    In Hospitality Design, we team up with Culinary Capstone students, who come up with an original concept for a restaurant in an international location, including a "bank-ready" business plan. They then pair up with Interior Design students, who work with them to design the space and build a model. The project is capped off with a celebration during the portfolio show, complete with samples from the restaurant's menu.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Have a passion for drawing and design.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Take advantage of as many internship opportunities as you can while you’re here. It’s a great way to see where your skills fit in the industry and get the kind of experience you can’t get in a classroom.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I'm a practicing artist who paints cityscapes.

    Read More...
  • Dr. Scot Trodick

    Dr. Scot Trodick

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Creativity is going to be the needed skill in the coming age and right-brainers will become a sought after resource."

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    Dr. Scot Trodick

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    In 5th grade I created a graphite drawing of the Headless Horseman and the piece was displayed in the school hallway. The feeling was so rewarding and I’ve always remembered that. Drawing has been something I was doing on an ongoing basis since as far back as I can remember.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I have worked with a variety of different companies ranging from corporations to start-ups which include Planetwide Games, Warner Bros., Marvel, National Geographic Kids, Sony Online Entertainment, and Paramount Pictures. From all of this industry experience I have gained many skills and insight and I weave those into the majority of my classes.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I love hands on activities that let students explore creativity and real-world business skills. One example would be a project where the students work in a group and create an entire online business from scratch. And it’s done live. It’s hosted on the student's web server space and is built to function as a real online business entity. After the initial setup, the students are tasked to make business decisions about their online company.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is a huge part of the creative process. It helps us see things differently. The ability to work with others in order to come up with better ideas and new ways of seeing things is a crucial skill in staying ahead. Right-brain skills and collaboration will be crucial in the coming age.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    You get what you put into it. Great things do not come from an epiphany; great things come from hard work. As one works hard toward a goal, great things begin to happen and ideas begin to flourish.

    Anything else?

    I currently teach in the Design department but have also taught classes in Media Arts and Foundations. My experience has been awesome! I enjoy getting to teach the subject matters I love every day. My role as a faculty member, in my eyes, is to not only educate, but to also motivate and inspire. Passion to do what one loves has to be nourished. Creativity is going to be the needed skill in the coming age and right-brainers will become a sought after resource. The truly successful will realize that they have the ability to nourish and build on their creative capacity.

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  • Genadi Radiul

    Genadi Radiul

    Audio Production

    "A good sense of humor is a very valuable characteristic to have when entering a creative field."

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    Genadi Radiul

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was playing for quite a bit before I decided to enroll for a degree at the Vilnius Music Conservatory in Lithuania. It was attending college for jazz music performance that solidified my path.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I try to conduct my classroom as a professional environment. I am professional and I expect students to be the same. One example of this is being on time and completing projects as according to the spec sheets. This may seem like a simple concept, however, if students are conditioned to this in the classroom, the transition to the real world will be easier.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My Composition and Scoring class organically merges my professional background and teaching style. There is a unique balance between the degree of flexibility I allow and adherence to creative requirements. This is an advanced class and students will most often realize their creative potential through the duration of the quarter.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    The collaboration between making music and designing audio is very apparent. So I make sure that a student's collaborative experiences in the classroom will prepare them for the professional world.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    You need support. If you have support, you will succeed. Support, as an instructor, means that I am offering my students creative advice and providing tools to help them achieve their goals.

    What’s some critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    A good sense of humor is a very valuable characteristic to have when entering a creative field.

    Read More...
  • J. L. Van Dall

    J. L. Van Dall

    Game Art & Design

    "I show students excellent examples of work... and press them to exceed that level."

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    J. L. Van Dall

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional

    I knew very early on. In elementary school I had my artwork in juried shows. The counselor at the school told me this is something that I should plan on doing when I grew up.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I talk about my professional experiences as an animator and 3D artist often in class. During my instruction, I talk about how the industry has changed and show examples of the differences.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and inspiring your students to do more?

    It’s not just an assignment, but my 3D Animation and Character Animation classes really showcase my methods. In them I show students excellent examples of work that fit what we are doing in class and press them to exceed that level.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Stressing teamwork and not wanting to disappoint your team is key to success. I don't teach many classes with group projects at this point but when I did, I would tell my students that the habits they develop in class will help them to grow and obtain that job they want. Being collaborative should be a habit.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be respectful, be on time, ask for feedback, and be a good teammate.

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  • Chef Kelly Funes

    Chef Kelly Funes

    Culinary Arts

    "There's a sense of urgency in the restaurant business—you have to work fast."

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    Chef Kelly Funes

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Both of my grandmothers were great cooks, and they influenced my decision to become a chef.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share what it’s like to work in the hospitality business. I treat the classroom like a restaurant. Students learn restaurant-style plating, timing, and cooking techniques. There’s a sense of urgency in the restaurant business—you have to work fast. I work to instill that in my students.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    In my kitchen classes, I give students an Action Plan assignment. It prepares them for a typical day of cooking. They must type out recipes, and determine the food cost for one of their dishes. The assignment includes a timeline—a game plan of what they’re going to do and when. I also make sure to share my love for different ingredients and dishes that students aren’t familiar with.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Teamwork contributes a great deal to success. It gives students another point of view—and another side of the business. Culinary students may work with Interior Design or Graphic Design students in their portfolio class. Those disciplines are very important when it comes to opening a restaurant.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Work hard and be on time.

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  • San Diego Program Coordinator of General Education Mary Broding

    Mary Broding

    General Education

    "I learn from my students every day. That's what I love most about teaching."

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    Mary Broding

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was in Paris with my high school French club, viewing impressionist work at the Musée d'Orsa. Walking past Monet's Rouen Cathedral series, I was stunned by how paint could achieve the effect of atmospheric shimmer. I walked through the Impressionist section many times, in a haze, absolutely taken with the work. That’s when I knew I wanted to study art history, and either work in an art museum or teach art history.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I primarily teach College English and Creative Nonfiction, and I bring my love of the written word to class. Many of my students have struggled with writing in the past so I ask them to write about something they’re comfortable with and interested in. I want to help them build the confidence they’ll need to express themselves in writing, no matter what profession they choose.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I’m all about experiential learning, getting students out of the classroom and into the community. I recently took my Creative Nonfiction class to the Cannibalism exhibit at the San Diego Museum of Man—then had them write an essay on whether they’d ever consider taking part in cannibalism. Students were eager to respond and ready to back up their answer to the question, drawing from what they’d learned at the exhibit.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    No one is an island, especially today. Students need to learn to be able to get along and be productive with people from different personal and professional backgrounds.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Writing is a constant learning process. Once I let students know that I have a hard time with certain aspects of it, they know it‘s okay for them to struggle, too.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be realistic. You’re going to fail—and that’s okay. In fact, failing will help make you stronger at whatever you do.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I truly care about our students. We have a fantastic bunch of individuals here who bring a vast variety of experience and knowledge to the table. I learn from my students every day. That’s what I love most about teaching.

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  • Graphic Design Faculty Member Michael Anthony Lynch

    Michael Anthony Lynch

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Always experiment with the concept before starting the actual design."

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    Michael Anthony Lynch
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    Throughout middle school and high school, I loved to draw. I was the kid who had a line of students waiting to have me sign their yearbook because I would always draw a picture specifically for that student. After high school I took a few jobs just to pay the bills, but I wasn’t happy. I looked into careers where I could use my art skills, and came across graphic design. I earned my B.A. and started working in the publishing field, designing book covers.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    After working as lead designer for several publishing houses, I opened my own book cover design business. I learned the design industry inside and out. I bring that knowledge and experience to the classroom...I introduce myself to students as a "designer who also teaches," not a "teacher who also designs.” I’m a designer first, and that’s how I approach each class.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I use a learner-centered approach; my courses consist of a brief lecture, an exercise to illustrate the lecture material, an in-class assignment, and then a workshop segment.

    A typical project might be creating a kitchen counter environment that illustrates various personality traits using only items found in a kitchen...for instance, conveying "confidence" by showing a large, shiny chrome cheese grater next to an enormous block of cheese.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    It gives students a sense of what it’s like to work in the industry—brainstorming to create a brand, working in teams of copywriters, photographers, web designers, illustrators, etc. It helps prepare students to work in an industry where collaboration is key to successful design.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Always experiment with the concept before starting the actual design. Many times students—and professionals, for that matter—focus on the end result. I tell students to play in the field of ideas first...experiment with many ideas to solve a single design problem. Committing too soon to a concept may eliminate a potentially brilliant idea that hasn't had time to surface.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I’ve taught thousands of students. It makes me proud when I see them succeed in the industry. I couldn't have picked a better career path. Read More...
  • Otto Lai

    Otto Lai

    Media Arts & Animation

    "Show up on time, do quality work, and be friendly."

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    Otto Lai

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    In 1995, I was an intern at MTV Animation working on Beavis and Butthead. Watching the artists at work, how they dressed, and how they decorated their work spaces had a big impact on me. I knew I needed to work in a creative environment like that.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    In my Media Arts classes, I share stories about how things work in the professional world, including everyday things like how to ask for a raise—to give students a sense of what they can expect when they enter the industry.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    Every project—even the smallest homework assignment—relates to tasks students might do on the job. For example, we work on naming conventions for deliverables like a QuickTime movie or image file. I motivate students by showing them examples of quality work and impressing upon them that it’s within their reach.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration plays a huge part in the professional media arts world. Teaming up on projects here in school helps students understand how important communication is to the quality of that project.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Show up on time, do quality work, and be friendly.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Teaching is my passion.

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  • "Listen with your eyes."

    Richard Ybarra

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Listen with your eyes."

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    Richard Ybarra

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was born with a good eye for design. As a child, I drew on the walls in our home. In high school I progressed to graffiti. While studying art and photography in college, I entered gallery art exhibitions and won a few awards. That’s when I began to consider design as a career. Working in ad agencies and design firms fueled my ambition and creativity, and allowed me to explore other areas of art and design.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    With 37 years in the advertising/design profession and 25 years of teaching, I bring a lot of creativity and knowledge to the classroom. I draw on all that experience depending on the classroom situation.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My class projects let students apply their creative skills and talents to corporate branding, typography, and conceptual design. I encourage them to think smart and work smart. I share my passion, knowledge, and wisdom, and help them develop the independent thinking and organizational skills to become more confident and produce better work. The more they learn about themselves, the more creative they become.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Working as part of a team helps students understand the process of a given project, and also helps them learn to communicate...to present their work both visually and verbally.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be more aware of what’s happening in the real world. Read at least one daily newspaper to get a better sense of reality. Attend business and social events to improve your networking skills. Find a good mentor, someone who’s walked the path to success. And most of all, listen with your eyes.

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  • Rob Esperti Headshot

    Rob Esperti

    Advertising

    "Be enthusiastic—and try really hard."

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    Rob Esperti

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    It hit me when I was visiting San Francisco and I realized I could draw the things I saw in the city.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    During lectures and on field trips, I often bring in projects I’m working on to share with students. I also invite guest speakers from the industry to speak and share their own industry experiences and perspectives.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    The National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) class is intense; students really have to put in extra effort. It brings out the best in them and pushes their unique abilities and skill sets to the forefront.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration—particularly among those with different skill sets—is critical to success in the advertising industry.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be enthusiastic—and try really hard. Students know when they've brought their truly best effort to class assignments, and only then does real learning happen.

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  • Chef Rudy Kloeble

    Rudy B. Kloeble, CEC

    Culinary Arts

    "Stoke the fire in your heart, because no one else will do it for you."

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    Rudy B. Kloeble, CEC

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I think I knew at age three when I was stuffing doughnuts at my dad’s bakery. It was reinforced when I found myself in a foreign country learning how to cook in a three-year apprenticeship program.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My twelve years of European training gave me a professional edge that I can pass along to my students. I bring many years of industry experience, both working for firms and for myself. I stay current with the demands of today’s industry by continuing to work part-time.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I have high standards, and I give students a clear idea of what I expect. Once we create a plan, the steps seem easier and more manageable. One of the most challenging classes I teach is Garde Manger. The Banquet Event Order project is a beast. It demands that students pull from at least two other courses. Menu writing, culinary math, diagrams, and creativity all come into play.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    When creative people work together and egos are set aside, creativity explodes and students have fun and push themselves further. In the real world today, graphic design, fashion design, and interior design all come into play when a concept is developed.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Discipline. It’s about how you start your day, how you plan your week, and how you learn.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Ask questions. Practice, practice, practice. And stoke the fire in your heart, because no one else will do it for you.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    The opportunity to influence students is the greatest gift I’ve ever received.

    Read More...
  • Tricia Murray

    Tricia Murray

    Interior Design

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    Tricia Murray
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