Interior & Product Design

InteriorDesign

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Build a better future.

You can learn to make things that are smarter, simpler, and better—from the tools people use to the places where they live and work.

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Interior Design Bachelor’s Program is to prepare students to obtain entry-level positions in their field and function as trained professionals. Students conceive and develop viable design solutions within the interior environment utilizing creative, critical, and technical methodologies. They are prepared for the purpose of improving the quality of life, increasing productivity, and protecting the health, safety, and wellbeing of the public by incorporating function, aesthetics, and environmentally sustainable products. By meeting the educational goals, students should develop an attitude of flexibility and a desire for life-long learning necessary to meet the changing demands of the interior design profession.

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Interior Design Program Image

Interior Design

Tricia Wright

Interior Design , 2015

The Art Institute of California—Sacramento, a campus of Argosy University

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Develop the technical and creative skills to design attractive interior spaces that meet strict requirements for safety, accessibility, and sustainability.

Meet Our Faculty

  • San Diego Program Coordinator of General Education Mary Broding

    Mary Broding

    Graphic & Web Design

    "I learn from my students every day. That's what I love most about teaching."

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    Mary Broding

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was in Paris with my high school French club, viewing impressionist work at the Musée d'Orsa. Walking past Monet's Rouen Cathedral series, I was stunned by how paint could achieve the effect of atmospheric shimmer. I walked through the Impressionist section many times, in a haze, absolutely taken with the work. That’s when I knew I wanted to study art history, and either work in an art museum or teach art history.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I primarily teach College English and Creative Nonfiction, and I bring my love of the written word to class. Many of my students have struggled with writing in the past so I ask them to write about something they’re comfortable with and interested in. I want to help them build the confidence they’ll need to express themselves in writing, no matter what profession they choose.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I’m all about experiential learning, getting students out of the classroom and into the community. I recently took my Creative Nonfiction class to the Cannibalism exhibit at the San Diego Museum of Man—then had them write an essay on whether they’d ever consider taking part in cannibalism. Students were eager to respond and ready to back up their answer to the question, drawing from what they’d learned at the exhibit.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    No one is an island, especially today. Students need to learn to be able to get along and be productive with people from different personal and professional backgrounds.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Writing is a constant learning process. Once I let students know that I have a hard time with certain aspects of it, they know it‘s okay for them to struggle, too.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Be realistic. You’re going to fail—and that’s okay. In fact, failing will help make you stronger at whatever you do.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I truly care about our students. We have a fantastic bunch of individuals here who bring a vast variety of experience and knowledge to the table. I learn from my students every day. That’s what I love most about teaching.

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  • "Listen with your eyes."

    Richard Ybarra

    Graphic & Web Design

    "Listen with your eyes."

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    Richard Ybarra

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was born with a good eye for design. As a child, I drew on the walls in our home. In high school I progressed to graffiti. While studying art and photography in college, I entered gallery art exhibitions and won a few awards. That’s when I began to consider design as a career. Working in ad agencies and design firms fueled my ambition and creativity, and allowed me to explore other areas of art and design.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    With 37 years in the advertising/design profession and 25 years of teaching, I bring a lot of creativity and knowledge to the classroom. I draw on all that experience depending on the classroom situation.

    How would you describe your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My class projects let students apply their creative skills and talents to corporate branding, typography, and conceptual design. I encourage them to think smart and work smart. I share my passion, knowledge, and wisdom, and help them develop the independent thinking and organizational skills to become more confident and produce better work. The more they learn about themselves, the more creative they become.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Working as part of a team helps students understand the process of a given project, and also helps them learn to communicate...to present their work both visually and verbally.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be more aware of what’s happening in the real world. Read at least one daily newspaper to get a better sense of reality. Attend business and social events to improve your networking skills. Find a good mentor, someone who’s walked the path to success. And most of all, listen with your eyes.

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