Interior & Product Design

Interior &Product Design

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Build a better future.

You can learn to make things that are smarter, simpler, and better—from the tools people use to the places where they live and work.

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Interior Design Bachelor’s Program is to prepare students to obtain entry-level positions in their field and function as trained professionals. Students conceive and develop viable design solutions within the interior environment utilizing creative, critical, and technical methodologies. They are prepared for the purpose of improving the quality of life, increasing productivity, and protecting the health, safety, and wellbeing of the public by incorporating function, aesthetics, and environmentally sustainable products. By meeting the educational goals, students should develop an attitude of flexibility and a desire for life-long learning necessary to meet the changing demands of the interior design profession.

Student Achievement Data

Program Areas

Industrial Design

James Ma

Industrial Design , 2006

The Art Institute of Seattle

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You can learn to design and manufacture products that meet the demand for the next-­generation everything as you take your ideas from concept to prototype.

Interior Design Program Image

Interior Design

Tricia Wright

Interior Design , 2015

The Art Institute of California—Sacramento, a campus of Argosy University

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Develop the technical and creative skills to design attractive interior spaces that meet strict requirements for safety, accessibility, and sustainability.

Meet Our Faculty

  • Antoine Rondenet

    Baking & Pastry

    "Embrace your mistakes, keep on learning, and always look at your work critically."

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    Antoine Rondenet

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    The light came on the first time I visited the international pastry show, called Intersuc, in Paris. I was stunned by the display of cakes, chocolate and sugar showpieces. I realized I was entering the most beautiful craft in the world: pâtisserie.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share real-world problems, and explain how applying the procedures we teach could have prevented those problems...things as simple as pasteurization barèmes to prevent food-borne illness, or knowing where ingredients come from and how that affects their costs.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I break my management by menu class into two main parts. In the first, students create a restaurant and its menu. In the second we do a case study of a local restaurant, looking at how it operates. We go through the financial steps to determine whether or not the restaurant will stay in business, and why.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    For me, collaboration is essential. I tell my students that a food critic doesn’t grade just one individual, but his whole dining experience. That means the entire team needs to be working together toward excellence.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Embrace your mistakes, keep on learning, and always look at your work critically.

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  • Joshua Brincko

    Interior Design

    "There is no shortcut, and there's no substitute for hard work."

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    Joshua Brincko

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    When I was six, I visited an art museum in Cincinnati that had large, colorful abstract sculptures. I drew them from memory on graph paper, and my aunt bought one for five dollars. I instantly thought, wow, I can be paid for doing this! I never sold another one, but my parents encouraged me by telling me I could earn a living as an architect. Today I have my own practice. And it all started with five dollars of inspiration.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Every single topic I introduce in class, every project I assign, is carefully paired with an example of how it relates to my professional experience. I also relate current professional challenges and give students opportunities to offer solutions. It’s all about giving them a sense of the real world.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    The design studio courses are the specialty in any design student's education. This isn’t just a class where you read a book, do homework, and take tests. It’s simulates a real design project; students evaluate actual design parameters and design a solution using models, drawings, renderings, and other presentation tools. A design studio course can turn into a full-time job for students who take it seriously, so I give them a lot of support and mentor them through the design process.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    A student has never truly been "busy" until they’ve taken a design studio course. When they’re immersed in designing creative spaces, they learn what busy really is.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success?

    Designers rarely work in a vacuum. They each have a unique background and skill set, so working in the same room with other designers lets them learn from each other and overcome challenges—there's often someone around who’s already tried what someone else may be struggling with. I run a study buddy program that links seasoned students with newer ones. When younger students work in the same space as upperclassmen, the more experienced designers learn to mentor while the underclassmen get valuable input from peers who’ve made their way through the project at hand.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    There is no shortcut, and there’s no substitute for hard work. Dedicate yourself to your craft.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Gain experience in every facet of the industry. If you don't know how to build something, how can you successfully design it?

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