Culinary_Arts

CulinaryArts

I'm ready to take on the world.

For you, food isn’t just what you eat. It’s somewhere between how you express your creativity and who you are as a person. And at a time when culinary tastes are evolving and cultural barriers are disappearing, the industry needs people like you. In our Culinary Arts degree programs, you’ll be immersed in an environment that’s as close to the real world as it gets. Working in a modern, professional kitchen, you can hone your cooking skills as you focus on learning to deliver the popular international flavors and techniques today’s consumers—and employers—want and expect. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty*. It’ll take everything you’ve got. But it can lead to a career where you do what you love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Arts in Culinary Arts

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Associate of Arts in Culinary Arts

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/100 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Catalog

Diploma in Culinary Arts

Quarter Credit Hours:
55
Timeframe:
4 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Diploma in Culinary Arts

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3218 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important data.

View Academic Catalog

Classroom Experience

If it was easy, I wouldn't be interested.

As global cuisines become more and more prevalent, the culinary world becomes more and more competitive, fueled largely by the growing need to provide those global cuisines to demanding and discerning consumers. That’s where our culinary school meets your future. Starting with fundamentals like knife skills, using kitchen tools, and developing culinary techniques, we’ll guide you through everything from basic cuts to managing a menu to working as part of a team. Each course builds on what you’ve had the opportunity to learn—and that curriculum includes more than 20 popular international cuisines, including Latin, Asian, and American Regional. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet our Alumni

  • The Art Institute of Tampa, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design alumni AJ Mangas

    AJ Mangas

    Culinary Arts , 2013

    The instructors not only taught me basic skills, [but] what to expect in the field by teaching from their own experiences.

    Read More
    AJ Mangas

    Line and Banquet Cook at Carlouel Yacht Club

    AJ Mangas is working as a line and banquet cook at Carlouel Yacht Club in Clearwater, Florida. He is responsible for preparing stations and banquets, as well as creating dishes. AJ says that his days are very fast paced. “We have a small staff in the kitchen, so it requires a lot of concentration and technique to ensure the food is prepared correctly and to the [Head] Chef’s standards,” he says.

    AJ is proud to have made a career change in his 30s, moving from a position as an auto technician to his current culinary career. “I love creating new dishes, or putting my own twist on classic dishes, using fresh ingredients.” AJ adds that the most satisfying part of being a chef is hearing that customers enjoy his creations. “The absolute best is when a server comes into the kitchen and tells me that the customer loved their dish. That makes all the stress and pressure worth it.”

    AJ, who in 2013 earned a Diploma in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Tampa, says that his education helped to prepare him for a culinary career. “Everything from the classes to the kitchen labs were amazing. The instructors not only taught me basic skills, [but] what to expect in the field by teaching from their own experiences*. I use the techniques that I learned [in school] every single day.”

    See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/3218 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    *Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

    Read More...
  • The Art Institute of Tampa, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design alumni Joshua Zeff

    Joshua Zeff

    Graphic & Web Design , 2014

    [My education] prepared me to communicate my creations and gave me a sense of what it would really be like to work in the real world.

    Read More
    Joshua Zeff

    Graphic Designer for J&R Bicycles

    Joshua Zeff is working as the graphic designer for J&R Bicycles in St. Petersburg, Florida. He is responsible for marketing, print, and web applications for the company. Joshua says that he enjoys the calm and chaotic combination that each day brings. “One day you’re doing nothing but the normal routine and then next day, eight products come in, two sales need promotional material done, and your boss is requesting design briefs. But that’s why I love what I do.”

    Joshua is inspired by intricate signage, theme park environments, bright and bold fonts, extreme textures, and unique packaging. “I’m drawn to interesting structures and art; anything that is unique or different fascinates me,” he says.

    Joshua, who in 2014 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Tampa, says that his education gave him a realistic sense of how the industry works. “Everything from the assignments to the deadlines and the critique sessions mentally prepared me to communicate my creations and gave me a sense of what it would really be like to work in the real world.” Joshua adds that current students should be humble as they transition into their careers. “No matter how good you are or how good you think you are, you are just starting.”

    See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/106 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • Jenna_Mack

    Jenna Mack

    Graphic & Web Design , 2013

    "[My] instructors' drive and passion in design was inspiring. I know I could still go to them today for advice if I needed it."

    Read More
    Jenna Mack

    Senior Graphic Designer for Triad Retail Media

    Jenna Mack is a senior graphic designer for Triad Retail Media, a marketing and content services company in St. Petersburg, Florida. She works with the sales, content, and marketing teams to concept strategies for leading brands, and aims to drive sales and enhance consumer experiences through digital retail platforms. Jenna says that her typical workday begins with coffee and emails. She looks at what’s on her plate for the day and creates a project task list. She then attends kickoff meetings for new projects—brainstorming and sketching ideas. “We get anywhere from a couple of hours to a week to turn a project around, and that determines how much of the creative process we get to follow.”

    She admits that her career is demanding and recommends that when pressure sets in, it’s important to remember the end goal. “Remind yourself of how far you've come and know that soon enough you're going to look back on this moment and realize how much further you've gotten. You will surprise yourself in what you accomplish and it makes the struggles worth it.” She adds that simply meeting job requirements is not enough, and takes pride in surrounding herself with information that helps her to grow professionally. This has allowed her to feel more confident in business meetings. “If you know what you're talking about it shows, and people start depending on you and looking at you as a go-to person for certain things. That's a great feeling.”

    Jenna cites a time when she felt stuck on a project—and says that while it is difficult, everyone goes through it. “I realized that if other people could get past it, then I could too. I also changed how I looked at my current situation. Changing your perspective can make everything feel a lot better.” For a mental break, she takes the time to play a game, work on a puzzle, or share ideas with coworkers. “We also surround our work area with inspiring quotes and good design.”

    Her determination is rewarded when she receives compliments on her work. “Seeing your work live, or people interacting with it, is pretty rewarding.” She did face a challenge after her manager left—she was given the opportunity to either step up and take the open position or to continue working under a new manager. “It was a little scary and a lot all at once, but I felt I deserved the chance to step up and I wanted to take the challenge. So far, it's gone more smoothly than I thought, and pushed me to step outside of my comfort zone. I've accomplished things I wouldn't have believed were possible for me a year ago.”

    Jenna, who in 2013 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from The Art Institute of Tampa, says that her instructors’ drive and passion in design was inspiring. She adds that the school’s strict attendance policy prepared her for a real world work environment—she was early to every class, stayed late, and only missed class if she absolutely had too. “I became more responsible. I definitely didn't feel like the typical college student.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/106 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.


    Read More...
  • Kirsten "KJ" Mathers

    Kirsten "KJ" Mathers

    Culinary Arts , 2016

    "The classroom curriculum enabled a more broad vision of what it is like to be a chef. Without the full scope of the curriculum [at The Art Institute of Tampa], I would not be able to approach this job in the way that I am now."

    Read More
    Kirsten "KJ" Mathers
    Head Chef at Resort on Island of St. Kitts, Oversees Kitchen and Menu Creation

    Kirsten Mathers’ first immersion into international cuisine took place when she traveled to Italy, while still a student, as a finalist in the Urbani Tartufi Truffle Competition. Today, she’s working as the head chef of a resort on the island of St. Kitts, in charge of a restaurant that recently re-opened. Kirsten oversees the menu, puts ServSafe procedures in place, standardizes menus, and manages inventory. “It was an unexpected opportunity, but one that I know will be pivotal in my professional career,” she says.

    While still a student, Kirsten earned the opportunity to cook New Year’s Eve dinner at the prestigious James Beard House and was selected for a two week trip to Italy to participate in the Urbani Tartufi Truffle Competition. Upon completion of her degree, two of her Chef instructors helped to connect her with an internship at an Italian resort—and finally her job in St. Kitts.

    Her work day includes morning prep, then a quick break before she returns in the afternoon to get ready for dinner service. As the restaurants ramps up its staff, Kirsten hopes to turn over the prep work to new hires and devote more time to planning and record keeping—but will continue to work inside the kitchens for the dinner hours.

    Kirsten says that she’s currently facing a big challenge. “The executive chef of the resort where my restaurant is located resigned unexpectedly four days after I got here. I was left in charge of a restaurant that had re-opened just five days before his resignation.” She adds that her education immediately assisted her with stepping up to the challenge. “The well-rounded education that I got at The Art Institute of Tampa, as well as the support of my chef instructors and family/friends [allowed me] to face this challenge with confidence and excitement.”

    On St. Kitts, there’s an existing framework to Island favorites—but growing tourism allows Kirsten to experiment and stretch the minds of her culinary staff. “It's always a conversation, but it's been fun to see the way that all of us are willing to try new things, or combine both the local heart and the tourists’ tastes.”

    While she tries to make room for downtime, she says that a chef's mind never stops. “Food never ends, so cooking never ends. Requisitions never end so tracking products never ends. Restaurants cannot remain stagnant, so you must learn the taste of people around you to know what sorts of things you can create to put on the menu.” Kirsten spends time learning how to create foods and says that she’s always present and aware—watching everything going on in the kitchen. “On the flip side, to be a healthy chef, you must make sure to commit to stopping your chef brain and taking time to do what you need to do for yourself to keep you going as a chef.”

    Kirsten, who in 2016 earned an Associate of Arts in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Tampa, says that she started her culinary education five years after earning a bachelor’s degree in Youth Ministry. “I knew I needed to do something more.

    Up until then I had worked in a coffee shop, served in a restaurant, and did a quick stint as a bank teller, but never really considered culinary school until I realized that all of my free time was spent experimenting in the kitchen.” She says that the labs and in-kitchen classes challenged her and that her instructors pushed her to reach her potential. “The classroom curriculum enabled a more broad vision of what it is like to be a chef. Without the full scope of the curriculum there, I would not be able to approach this job in the way that I am now.”

    She admits that life in the culinary industry is tough, requiring a hardworking, consistent attitude. “All chefs fail at some point or another, because food is a endless palate. The fact of the matter is that you will get out what you put in. I'm sure people have heard that over and over again, but we must rise to the challenges that are placed in front of us.” Kirsten mentions that her instructors wanted her to be successful and encouraged her to become a consistent, and curious culinary artist.

    “It’s been a wild ride, and I am excited to see the way things keep on unfolding. I do have to say though that as much as I have reaped rewards of hard work and determination, not one bit of any of it would be possible without the network of chefs teaching, guiding, helping, and encouraging me. One cannot be a chef alone.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/100 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info. Read More...
  • Ryan_Sullivan

    Ryan Sullivan

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production , 2012

    "The programs that I use and the equipment I use were [part of the curriculum] during my four years at The Art Institute of Tampa."

    Read More
    Ryan Sullivan

    Promotions Producer for Sinclair Broadcast Group

    Ryan Sullivan is a promotions producer for Sinclair Broadcast Group. He writes, edits, and films news talent to promote daily events for KEYE TV News in Austin, Texas. Ryan also produces spots to promote station branding. “My typical workday begins with me going over current events happening around our city. I will write and produce commercials. And before the 10 o'clock news, I will sit in meetings to find the story we will promote for the newscast,” he says.

    Prior to working with Sinclair Broadcast Group, Ryan was a video editor for Americas Auction Network. He worked in promotions at Great 38 TV in Tampa and at FOX 29, WOAI NEWS 4, and the CW 35 in San Antonio, Texas.

    He says that there are daily challenges in his job, including breaking news and stories that don’t make the cut to the final broadcast. He adds that he’s currently facing the obstacle of finding time to pursue his passion of making movies. Ryan adds that he’s focused on providing innovative creative solutions that look good and reach the intended audience. “It is hard to reinvent the wheel. The same applies with creating a good commercial. Using typography different ways proves difficult. There is a fine line between trying to be unique and not overdoing it.”

    To promote a positive and creative environment in his workplace, Ryan always enters the studio refreshed and happy. “News can be a struggle, between a short leash and contained creativity, you have to stay upbeat. I think my coworkers can rely on me to keep things light and under control.” In addition to bringing positivity to the workplace, Ryan is proud to have been nominated for Emmy and National Promotional awards.

    Ryan, who in 2012 earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Filmmaking & Video Production from The Art Institute of Tampa, says that his education provided a foundation for his career success. “The programs that I use and the equipment I use, were [part of the curriculum] during my four years at The Art Institute of Tampa.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/102 for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

    Read More...
  • Viet Vo

    Viet Vo

    Culinary Management , 2009

    Read More
    Viet Vo
    Read More...

What Will I Study?

Culinary_Arts

This is my passion. This is my time.

There’s nothing easy about our Culinary Arts curriculum, which will immerse you in both traditional and emerging flavors from every corner of the world. You’ll cover a range of cuisines from Mexican to Middle Eastern as you study:

  • Culinary Techniques
  • Classical Techniques
  • Sanitation & Safety
  • Baking and Pastry Techniques
  • Management by Menu
  • Nutrition
  • Garde Manger
  • Foodservice Technology
  • Food & Beverage Operations Management
  • Planning & Controlling Costs
  • World Cuisine
  • American Regional Cuisine
  • Asian Cuisine
  • Latin Cuisine
  • A la carte Kitchen
  • Art Culinaire

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institute of Tampa, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Culinary Arts School is built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But along with that toughness comes all the support you’ll need at every step along the way. That’s why we provide the mentoring and real-world experience to help you prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field, along with opportunities to learn that go far beyond our kitchens. You’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. It won’t be easy. In fact, it’ll be the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • Digital Photography and Digital Filmmaking & Video Production Faculty Jim Reiman

    Jim Reiman

    Digital Filmmaking & Video Production

    Read More
    Jim Reiman
    Read More...
  • Meet The Art Institute of Tampa, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design Media Arts & Animation Instructor Krishna Sadasivam.

    Krishna Sadasivam

    Media Arts & Animation

    When students see how much time I put into my craft, I think they understand what it takes to survive and thrive as a designer.

    Read More
    Krishna Sadasivam

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I embraced creativity from a very early age. Working as an engineer, I made comics online – poking fun of technology and geek culture. A few of them were published on CNET, and that led to a regular paid gig with a tech magazine in Europe. Getting my first paycheck and seeing my work in print in a glossy magazine with a large circulation made me realize there were opportunities to make money with my art.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My clients have included Microsoft, Bandai Namco, and the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. Whether it’s designing a movie poster, pitching an idea, documenting process work, or knowing how to read and prepare a contract, I routinely bring my professional experiences and lessons learned into the classroom. It’s absolutely critical for students to understand that in today’s workforce, you have to wear many hats, work hard, ask questions, and have a can-do attitude. My job as an instructor is to give my students the time, tools and resources they need to become successful in their chosen field.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    I make it a point to ground all my class projects and assignments in a real-world context, emphasizing the importance of visual process and research to the design workflow.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I have high demands and expectations for myself, and when students see how much time I put into my craft, I think they understand what it takes to survive and thrive as a designer.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Teamwork and resource sharing are critical to success in this industry. Working across disciplines mirrors reality, and it’s important to understand and work within the dynamics of a team to get the work done.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Always be open to learning new things and sharing what you know with your peers. Be humble—there’s always someone who’s better than you are.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My job as an instructor is to give my students the time, tools and resources they need to succeed in their chosen field.

    Read More...
  • Mariela H. Genco

    Culinary Arts

    Gather all the information you can. Experience as much as possible. And adapt to what life throws at you.

    Read More
    Mariela H. Genco

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    It had to be when I was a little girl and my mother found me in the kitchen trying to make a "peach cake," which consisted of everything I could possibly find that had something to do with baking. That’s when I knew a 9-to-5 job just wasn't going to cut it. I needed more of an outlet.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    My teaching style revolves around how the industry really works, based on my experience. And I make sure my students understand what employers will expect of them once they enter the work force.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring, and how do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?

    I feel that all my assignments inspire students to push themselves and move out of their comfort zones. The more they go beyond their limits, the more they learn and grow as people and professionals.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is very important to student success. In the culinary industry, you’re a member of a team that works together to accomplish a common objective. Buying into the team concept usually leads to positive results—not only in the classroom, but also in a professional kitchen.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Gather all the information you can. Experience as much as possible. And adapt to what life throws at you.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    Make sure this is the creative career you want, because this industry is hard. Not being absolutely sure just won’t cut it.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    My position as a chef instructor lets me combine my passion for culinary with the structure of higher education.

    Read More...
  • Graphic Design Instructor Tod Heron

    Tod Heron

    Graphic & Web Design

    We're in the business of ideas. If a client asks for one, you'd better have 10.

    Read More
    Tod Heron

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    My first job out of college was picking oranges. I did that for about a month until I got a job in the composition department of the St. Petersburg Times. That was the defining moment: a creative career with air conditioning...and no citrus.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I tell stories of course, but I try to set up challenges that impress upon students the need to change how they think through a project, and how every decision has implications for a client, an audience, and a budget. It's not personal. It's just business.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching, mentoring, and pushing your students beyond their own perceived limits?

    We do a 99 thumbnail project to push students to not settle for the obvious. It forces them to think past the generic and really try to understand a word or a concept, and how to communicate it to someone else. We’re in the business of ideas. If a client asks for one, you’d better have 10.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Collaboration is a double-edged sword. For engaged students, it‘s a valuable experience that directly impacts their preparation for a career. For others, it highlights the competitiveness of the marketplace and provides them with peer feedback that, hopefully, ups their game.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I try to give them a process, a strategy, a scheme to solve visual design problems.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?

    I try to show them the way to solve a tough problem, without fear.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    I'm here.

    Read More...
  • Viet Vo

    Viet Vo

    Culinary Management , 2009

    Read More
    Viet Vo
    Read More...
The Art Institute of Michigan alumni Calvert Griffin [My education] helped me to learn how to be an effective teammate and work well with others. Calvert Griffin
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design, 2014, The Art Institute of Michigan