Gaming_Technology

Gaming & Technology

Request a Brochure

Program Areas

Game Art Design Program

Game Art & Design

Jasmine Sur

Media Arts & Animation , 2014

The Art Institute of Las Vegas

View gallery

You can learn how to take games from concept to market-ready—and turn your skills and passion for gaming as you prepare for a career as a key player and virtual storyteller.

Visual_Game_Programming_program

Visual & Game Programming

Ivy Hou

Game Art & Design , 2014

The Art Institute of California—San Diego, a campus of Argosy University

View gallery

Blend a programmer’s skills and an artist’s vision to solve creative and technical challenges and bring life to video game levels, characters, and stories.

Meet Our Faculty

  • Janet Wang

    Janet Wang

    Interior Design

    Read More
    Janet Wang
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a child, I found stories in books and games, and drawing...on the walls. I was always asking for more paper, pencils, boxes, scissors, and glue. I remember sitting at the kitchen table drawing on a scrap of paper as I visualized a story my mom had told of her day at work. When I looked up, I realized that I had drawn all over our Formica kitchen table. I still draw on walls—when I’m asked to—and I still love creating visual stories.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I believe an artist needs to be multi-talented and multi-faceted, able to present, research, ideate, network, sell, make, fail, refine, and create all within a larger social and historical context. In the design classroom, I teach with this bigger picture in mind. We learn and apply visual logic with visual metaphor to create dynamic and current design.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I assign my Drawing students what’s called an exploded diagram—a drawing of an object with its component parts in a controlled "explosion" along set axis. The group chooses the object, thumbnails the explosion, and then each member draws one part of the whole. They check in as team to ensure that the finished product, when glued together, is consistent in scale and form.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    As a foundations instructor, I have the pleasure of teaching students from many different programs in one classroom. In the exploded diagram project, one group included a graphic designer, an interior design student, and an animation student. Ideas are shared, and students help each other reach a common goal. When we’re learning a core concept, I’ll show students examples from various media. It sparks interesting dialogue between media and design students, who each have their own interpretation what they see.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I urge them to say why they’re making a statement, whether positive or negative. Knowing the rationale behind any creative project, critique or decision is essential to fully exploring your process and your practice. Read More...
  • Bernadette Askey

    Bernadette Askey

    Interior Design

    "Be flexible, positive, and always ready to learn."

    Read More
    Bernadette Askey

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve always been creative. I realized my calling was to help students connect to their inner creative selves when I was tutoring college classmates.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Students love hearing real-life scenarios, so explaining events that commonly happen during a design project excites them. And when they are excited, they’re eager to learn. I arrange opportunities that let them learn by doing. They learn best by sharing what they’ve experienced as well. I take students on field trips, introduce them to industry reps, and bring industry professionals to class as guest speakers.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    All my class assignments are based on the real world, and on enforcing relevant skills. Students often work in groups, because teamwork skills are always in demand. In many assignments, students can reach out to the industry, which helps them find their own voice and allows them to network before graduation.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Students can gain an overall vision of how multiple disciplines collaborate on projects. Understanding the role of other professionals within as well as outside their area of study helps them see the big picture and come up with the best design solutions.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be flexible, positive, and always ready to learn.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Designing interior spaces is based on considering human needs, and that’s what I practice here.

    Read More...
  • Andrew Czink

    Andrew Czink

    Audio Production

    "Pay attention to your mistakes so you can grow and become better as a result."

    Read More
    Andrew Czink

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    For me, it was more of a gradual realization as I progressed through high school that I wanted to work in music and audio.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share stories from my professional career in the classroom every day to illustrate principles that relate to the task at hand, and to help answer questions and make the learning more real.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My assignments vary greatly, depending on the course. I try to make sure that students learn a broad base of fundamental skills they can apply to many different creative problems. I work to establish a problem-solving approach to creative projects, so they can learn to think through client expectations—and be proactive and imaginative in meeting and exceeding those expectations. That often means pushing or blurring boundaries. By understanding the standard approaches well, they’re better equipped to know when to push further.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    Collaboration is critical in the music and audio industry, so all our projects are team-based. I try to help students understand that valuable creative contributions can come from others. Being receptive to a wide range of perspectives helps them expand their horizons.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Pay attention. Pay attention to the development of your skill set. Pay attention to client expectations and desires. Pay attention to how your actions affect others. Pay attention to the wider range of consequences of your actions. Pay attention to your mistakes so you can grow and become better as a result.

    Read More...
  • Jarett Metcalfe

    Jarett Metcalfe

    Game Art & Design

    Read More
    Jarett Metcalfe
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was designing what would otherwise be considered a typical student architecture project when, out of nowhere, I came up with idea of building an interactive multimedia component into it. I had so much fun with that aspect of the design that nothing else I did afterwards felt quite the same. I couldn't get it out of my head. After that, my time was consumed with designing video games. As soon as I got my degree, I changed careers. And the rest, as they say, is history.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I bring non-disclosure agreement (NDA) compliant examples from my experience in different roles with various companies, games, and game teams into my lectures to provide a clear and sometimes humorous picture of what the industry, game development, and each profession are really like.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I try to cultivate independent thought and critical thinking. One assignment asks students to research game design theories and models and come up with one of their own. I first assigned this project on a hunch, and I was blown away by the quality of the work—incredibly rigorous, insightful, creative, and often just as useful in its own way as many of the design theories and approaches veteran designers have published. It’s all about moving students beyond rote learning to create their own ideas, theories and approaches to design.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?


    Back to that research project, students get a huge confidence boost and display a radically different approach to their work after that. They come away with far more independent, critical, and creative thought—and much less reliance on instructor input and approval.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Games are generally made by both large and small, multi-disciplinary teams, so being able to collaborate in a complex team environment is a critical skill. A big focus of our game design program is providing many opportunities for students to build games together, in both design theory and game production classes, so they can learn the skills to succeed on game teams in a hands-on, practical way.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I urge students to identify as soon as possible the kind of designer they want to be, the areas of game design they want to focus on, the kinds of games they want to make, and the sector of the industry they want to work in for the first year or two of their career. Then they can focus on gaining the specific knowledge, skills, experience, and industry connections to move further.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?


    Start networking while you’re still building your design portfolio. Make friends with people who work in the game industry. They can help you strengthen your work, give you insider tips, and tell you about design jobs that aren’t posted online. They might even put in a good word for you.

    Anything else you’d like to share?


    Just this: Students who’ve built strong, well-targeted, entry-level design skill-sets, excellent reputations by doing great work and being great team players, and authentic networks are usually the first people to get design jobs. Read More...