Graphic & Web Design

Graphic &Web Design

I'm ready to prove myself.

Nobody has to tell you that visual communication is becoming more and more interactive. And as the lines between graphic design and web design become less defined, employers are starting to look for both graphic designers with interactive skills and web developers with solid design skills. If you’re considering either direction, our Graphic & Web Design degree programs is the place to start. We’ll guide you through the fundamentals of visual communications in both disciplines. Then you’ll choose either a print or interactive concentration as you begin to work toward a future where you can do what you love. You’ll be surrounded and inspired by other talented, creatively driven students. And you’ll be and pushed, challenged, and, above all else, supported by experienced faculty* who know what it takes to succeed in the real world.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty & instructors.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Applied Design in Graphic Design

Quarter Credit Hours:
180
Estimated Number of Quarters:
12 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Bachelor of Applied Design in Graphic Design

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4482 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Diploma in Advanced Graphic Design

Quarter Credit Hours:
30
Timeframe:
2 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Diploma in Advanced Graphic Design

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/147 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Diploma in Graphic Design

Quarter Credit Hours:
75
Timeframe:
5 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Diploma in Graphic Design

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/152 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

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Diploma in Graphic Design & Foundation for Design

Quarter Credit Hours:
90
Timeframe:
6 Quarters

Gainful Employment

Outcomes

Diploma in Graphic Design & Foundation for Design

Outcomes

See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/153 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

View Academic Calendar

Classroom Experience

I have the talent and the intensity. I just need the tools.

Both graphic design and web design are really about coming up with new approaches to solve problems. So you’ll start with the basics of both in areas like color, illustration, and image manipulation, then explore concept development and implementation courses. After your first year, you’ll choose a concentration. In Graphic Design, you’ll take a more traditional approach, studying product packaging, posters, art direction, and layout design. You’ll work on product packaging, posters, and interactive media, including web page design. You’ll work with professional technology, including image manipulation software and computer-aided design, then progress to art direction and strategies for designing a product, service, or message. If you choose Web Design, you’ll work across media platforms from mobile devices to desktop computers. This is screen-based visual communication involving interactive design and development using industry software, authoring systems and web scripting. You’ll explore emerging technology, work with audio and video, and more. See our gainful employment pages for possible careers that match the program that interests you.

Meet Our Alumni

  • 	alumni-courtney-nina-dizon

    Courtney Dizon

    Audio Production , 2012

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    Courtney Dizon
    Courtney-Nina Dizon is working as a sound engineer, music teacher, and manager at C.C. Infinite Music & Entertainment Group in Richmond, British Columbia. “I am a music teacher and I teach children of all ages piano, guitar, drums, bass, violin, flute, dance, bands, and live sound.” As the head sound engineer at C.C. Infinite Music & Entertainment Group, Courtney-Nina records local artists and develops local talent. “I am responsible for the business side of things—handling new and existing students, scheduling, and coordinating events and performances across the lower mainland.” She says that having her own business allows her to be flexible with her schedule. “The Art Institute of Vancouver gave me the skills and knowledge to take my passion to the next level. I used to only be a music teacher, but enrolling in [the school] allowed me to discover and fine tune my skills as a sound engineer.”

    Courtney-Nina finds inspiration in the music of Alicia Keys and The Eagles and recommends that current students take networking seriously. “I am still very close friends with everyone from my graduating class. We have collaborated on a few projects and we support each other during CD release parties and other events. Your experience in the music industry will be more rewarding when you collaborate with others.”

    Courtney-Nina, who in2012 earned an Independent Recording Arts Certificate from The Art Institute of Vancouver, says that her education prepared her for her career. “[It provided] hands-on learning. I was able to speak the same lingo and understand the lingo of producers who are in the music industry working with artists that we hear on the radio.”

    See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info. Read More...
  • 	alumni-dexter-dolores

    Dexter Dolores

    Interior Design , 2008

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    Dexter Dolores
    Dexter Dolores is working as a self-employed interior designer at Dexter Dolores Interiors in Vancouver, British Columbia. He says that a typical day involves sourcing, meeting with clients or trades, running errands for projects—and lots of emails. “I enjoy the unpredictability of my career. Interior design, as a profession, requires so much multi-tasking that one moment you're a creative mind, the next you’re a project manager or casual laborer. Sometimes you're all three at the same time.” Dexter admits that interior design is a fast paced industry—but says that the changes keep things interesting. “I enjoy seeing my designs come to life and seeing or hearing people enjoy the spaces I've put together. At the core of what we all do as designers is creating, not just for creation sake, but for the enjoyment of those who will be interacting with it.”

    He’s proud to have taken the leap of starting his own company after working for a prestigious firm. “[I created] high-end residential interior design projects for a few years and although it was fantastic to be able to have such a great opportunity in a market that few young interior designers get to work in, I knew I wanted to grow in my own ways as a designer.” He received support from friends and family, which helped to solidify his decision to go out on his own. Dexter adds that he was a finalist and won the title of “Urban Barn's Next Top Designer 2014.” “That was a fantastic experience and it was definitely career shifting for me. I'm proud of accomplishing that and I know that there are so many more milestones to reach.” Dexter finds his creative inspiration in everything from photos to the work of others that he admires. “Other times even just touching or looking at a material, such as cabinet hardware, natural stone or inventive tile patterns can spark an exciting train of design ideas.”

    Dexter, who in 2008 earned an Interior Design Diploma from The Art Institute of Vancouver, says that his education helped him to launch his career. “The instructors are creative professionals who are currently working in their chosen industries*. My education was never strictly theoretical or academic. It had, almost always, a sense of real time, as if I were learning from an employer or a career mentor.” He adds that following his graduation, he kept in touch with his program’s director and that he enjoys bumping into instructors and feeling the passion that they have for interior design. Dexter recommends that budding interior designers be open to learning. “I went in with an enthusiasm to learn the program and study the different paths I could take upon graduation. By being open to whatever was to be thrown at me, my excitement remained throughout my whole time at the school and more so going into the working world.”

    See ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/4484 or program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info.
    *Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors. Read More...
  • alumni-natalie-diaz

    Natalie Diaz

    Visual Effects & Motion Graphics , 2006

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    Natalie Diaz
    Natalia is working in Gastown, British Columbia as a compositor for Psyop, a company that uses animation, design, illustration, 3D, 2D and live action production to help brands connect with consumers. She’s responsible for compositing final shots using 2D and 3D elements.

    Natalia’s projects include working on shots, setting up contact sheets, color grade shots, and matching computer graphics to plates. She’s worked on Oscar-nominated films and was nominated for a Gemini Award, given by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television to recognize the achievements of Canada's television industry. Natalia looks to Guillermo del Toro and Steven Spielberg for creative inspiration and says that the creative process of “painting” film is the best part of her job. She adds that a big trend in her industry is working in 4K resolution.

    Natalia, who in 2006 earned a Visual Effects & Foundation for Design Diploma from The Art Institute of Vancouver, says that her education helped her to understand the basic concepts and techniques needed to start her career. She recommends that current students be prepared for an industry that requires hard work and dedication. “Be prepared and don’t stop creating and experimenting. Enjoy your art and get really good at it.”

    See http://ge.artinstitutes.edu/programoffering/146 or program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important info. Read More...

What Will I Study?

Graphic & Web Design Study

I'm a visual problem solver. Let's get started.

The curriculum for each concentration is hands-on, rigorous, and well-rounded. It was designed by experienced industry and education innovators to emphasize the skills you’ll need to start you career. Beginning with common classes, then exploring concentration-specific areas, you'll study:

SHARED COURSES:
  • Color & Design Fundamentals
  • Image Manipulation
  • Traditional Typography
  • Layout & Concept Design
  • Web Page Scripting
  • Digital Illustration
  • Interactive Motion Graphics
GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCENTRATION:
  • Advertising Concepts
  • Form and Space, including Advanced Layout Design
  • Package Design
  • Business of Graphic Design
  • Publication Design
  • Art Direction
WEB DESIGN CONCENTRATION:
  • Information Architecture
  • Interface Design
  • Audio & Video
  • Design for Mobile Devices & Emerging Technologies
  • Web Page Design

I'm looking for my proving ground.

At The Art Institutes system of schools, creativity is our core, our calling, our culture. Our Graphic & Web Design degree programs are built on that creative foundation. It’s also built on our knowledge that a creative career is not for the faint of heart. Because it’s tough out there, it’s tough in here. But we temper the tough with the support you need to make your creativity marketable. We provide the mentoring and real-world experience you need to prevail, with faculty* who’ve worked in the field and internship possibilities at successful businesses. Here, you’ll be encouraged and expected to be bold. To take risks. To push yourself and the people around you. So if your heart is telling you that you belong in a creative field, you belong here. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever love.

*Credentials and experience levels vary by faculty and instructors.

 

Meet Our Faculty

  • Janet Wang

    Janet Wang

    Interior Design

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    Janet Wang
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    As a child, I found stories in books and games, and drawing...on the walls. I was always asking for more paper, pencils, boxes, scissors, and glue. I remember sitting at the kitchen table drawing on a scrap of paper as I visualized a story my mom had told of her day at work. When I looked up, I realized that I had drawn all over our Formica kitchen table. I still draw on walls—when I’m asked to—and I still love creating visual stories.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I believe an artist needs to be multi-talented and multi-faceted, able to present, research, ideate, network, sell, make, fail, refine, and create all within a larger social and historical context. In the design classroom, I teach with this bigger picture in mind. We learn and apply visual logic with visual metaphor to create dynamic and current design.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I assign my Drawing students what’s called an exploded diagram—a drawing of an object with its component parts in a controlled "explosion" along set axis. The group chooses the object, thumbnails the explosion, and then each member draws one part of the whole. They check in as team to ensure that the finished product, when glued together, is consistent in scale and form.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    As a foundations instructor, I have the pleasure of teaching students from many different programs in one classroom. In the exploded diagram project, one group included a graphic designer, an interior design student, and an animation student. Ideas are shared, and students help each other reach a common goal. When we’re learning a core concept, I’ll show students examples from various media. It sparks interesting dialogue between media and design students, who each have their own interpretation what they see.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I urge them to say why they’re making a statement, whether positive or negative. Knowing the rationale behind any creative project, critique or decision is essential to fully exploring your process and your practice. Read More...
  • Bernadette Askey

    Bernadette Askey

    Interior Design

    "Be flexible, positive, and always ready to learn."

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    Bernadette Askey

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I’ve always been creative. I realized my calling was to help students connect to their inner creative selves when I was tutoring college classmates.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    Students love hearing real-life scenarios, so explaining events that commonly happen during a design project excites them. And when they are excited, they’re eager to learn. I arrange opportunities that let them learn by doing. They learn best by sharing what they’ve experienced as well. I take students on field trips, introduce them to industry reps, and bring industry professionals to class as guest speakers.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    All my class assignments are based on the real world, and on enforcing relevant skills. Students often work in groups, because teamwork skills are always in demand. In many assignments, students can reach out to the industry, which helps them find their own voice and allows them to network before graduation.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Students can gain an overall vision of how multiple disciplines collaborate on projects. Understanding the role of other professionals within as well as outside their area of study helps them see the big picture and come up with the best design solutions.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Be flexible, positive, and always ready to learn.

    Anything else you’d like to share?

    Designing interior spaces is based on considering human needs, and that’s what I practice here.

    Read More...
  • Andrew Czink

    Andrew Czink

    Audio Production

    "Pay attention to your mistakes so you can grow and become better as a result."

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    Andrew Czink

    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    For me, it was more of a gradual realization as I progressed through high school that I wanted to work in music and audio.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I share stories from my professional career in the classroom every day to illustrate principles that relate to the task at hand, and to help answer questions and make the learning more real.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?

    My assignments vary greatly, depending on the course. I try to make sure that students learn a broad base of fundamental skills they can apply to many different creative problems. I work to establish a problem-solving approach to creative projects, so they can learn to think through client expectations—and be proactive and imaginative in meeting and exceeding those expectations. That often means pushing or blurring boundaries. By understanding the standard approaches well, they’re better equipped to know when to push further.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?


    Collaboration is critical in the music and audio industry, so all our projects are team-based. I try to help students understand that valuable creative contributions can come from others. Being receptive to a wide range of perspectives helps them expand their horizons.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    Pay attention. Pay attention to the development of your skill set. Pay attention to client expectations and desires. Pay attention to how your actions affect others. Pay attention to the wider range of consequences of your actions. Pay attention to your mistakes so you can grow and become better as a result.

    Read More...
  • Jarett Metcalfe

    Jarett Metcalfe

    Game Art & Design

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    Jarett Metcalfe
    Was there a defining moment when you knew you were destined to become a creative professional?

    I was designing what would otherwise be considered a typical student architecture project when, out of nowhere, I came up with idea of building an interactive multimedia component into it. I had so much fun with that aspect of the design that nothing else I did afterwards felt quite the same. I couldn't get it out of my head. After that, my time was consumed with designing video games. As soon as I got my degree, I changed careers. And the rest, as they say, is history.

    How do you weave your professional background into the classroom experience?

    I bring non-disclosure agreement (NDA) compliant examples from my experience in different roles with various companies, games, and game teams into my lectures to provide a clear and sometimes humorous picture of what the industry, game development, and each profession are really like.

    What class assignment exemplifies your approach to teaching and mentoring?


    I try to cultivate independent thought and critical thinking. One assignment asks students to research game design theories and models and come up with one of their own. I first assigned this project on a hunch, and I was blown away by the quality of the work—incredibly rigorous, insightful, creative, and often just as useful in its own way as many of the design theories and approaches veteran designers have published. It’s all about moving students beyond rote learning to create their own ideas, theories and approaches to design.

    How do you inspire students to push themselves beyond their perceived limits?


    Back to that research project, students get a huge confidence boost and display a radically different approach to their work after that. They come away with far more independent, critical, and creative thought—and much less reliance on instructor input and approval.

    How does collaboration contribute to students’ success—particularly when students from various programs work together?

    Games are generally made by both large and small, multi-disciplinary teams, so being able to collaborate in a complex team environment is a critical skill. A big focus of our game design program is providing many opportunities for students to build games together, in both design theory and game production classes, so they can learn the skills to succeed on game teams in a hands-on, practical way.

    What’s the most important thing you impart to students to help them succeed in class and the real world?

    I urge students to identify as soon as possible the kind of designer they want to be, the areas of game design they want to focus on, the kinds of games they want to make, and the sector of the industry they want to work in for the first year or two of their career. Then they can focus on gaining the specific knowledge, skills, experience, and industry connections to move further.

    What’s the most critical advice you would offer any student embarking on a creative career?


    Start networking while you’re still building your design portfolio. Make friends with people who work in the game industry. They can help you strengthen your work, give you insider tips, and tell you about design jobs that aren’t posted online. They might even put in a good word for you.

    Anything else you’d like to share?


    Just this: Students who’ve built strong, well-targeted, entry-level design skill-sets, excellent reputations by doing great work and being great team players, and authentic networks are usually the first people to get design jobs. Read More...
Miami International University of Art & Design alumni Marlon Munoz I'm challenged by the opportunity to take my ideas and bring them to life. Marlon Munoz
Visual Effects & Motion Graphics, Miami International University of Art & Design, 2008